Special Issue "Rheology and Processing of Polymers"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Processing and Performance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Khalid Lamnawar
Website
Guest Editor
Ingénierie des Matériaux Polymères, IMP UMR CNRS 5223, France
Interests: rheology and flow; linear and nonlinear rheology; polymers and composites; polymer processing; multilayer; coextrusion; modeling; multiphase polymeric systems; biopolymers; biocomposites; composites.
Prof. Dr. Abderrahim Maazouz
Website
Guest Editor
Ingénierie des Matériaux Polymères, IMP UMR CNRS 5223, France
Interests: Polymers and composites, Polymer processing, reactive processing; multiphase polymeric systems; biopolymers, biocomposites; composites.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are delighted to invite you to submit a manuscript for a Special Issue of Polymers (impact factor of 3.164 and ranking 17/87 (Q1) in polymer science, https://www.mdpi.com/journal/polymers)) entitled "Rheology and Processing of Polymers”.

This Special Issue will cover the latest developments in the field of rheology and polymer processing, highlight cutting-edge research focusing on the processing of advanced polymers and their composites. It will demonstrate that the field of “Rheology and Polymer Processing” is still gaining increased attention. This Special Issue promises to maintain a good balance of papers to serve the attendees from academia and industry. It will provide cutting-edge research results and the latest developments in the field of polymer science and engineering, their innovative processing, biopolymers, and characterization, polymer-based products, polymer physics, composites, modeling and simulations, and rheology. Ideally, contributions should focus on fundamental and experimental results in a thematic range that comprises conventional processing technologies as well as innovative processing and materials-based macromolecular research. The issue will compile the current state-of-the-art and highlight the range of applications. Both original contributions and reviews are welcome.

Prof. khalid Lamnawar
Prof. Abderrahim Maazouz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Polymer processing
  • Rheology
  • Polymers
  • Natural polymers and biopolymers
  • Biopolymers
  • Polymer nanocomposites
  • Advanced polymers
  • Composites
  • Biocomposites
  • Modeling
  • Numerical simulation
  • Polymer physics
  • Innovative processing
  • Polymer melts
  • Polymer engineering

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Reliability of Free Inflation and Dynamic Mechanics Tests on the Prediction of the Behavior of the Polymethylsilsesquioxane–High-Density Polyethylene Nanocomposite for Thermoforming Applications
Polymers 2020, 12(11), 2753; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12112753 - 21 Nov 2020
Abstract
Numerical modeling of the thermoforming process of polymeric sheets requires precise knowledge of the viscoelastic behavior under conjugate effect pressure and temperature. Using two different experiments, bubble inflation and dynamic mechanical testing on a high-density polyethylene (HDPE) nanocomposite reinforced with polymethylsilsesquioxane HDPE (PMSQ–HDPE) [...] Read more.
Numerical modeling of the thermoforming process of polymeric sheets requires precise knowledge of the viscoelastic behavior under conjugate effect pressure and temperature. Using two different experiments, bubble inflation and dynamic mechanical testing on a high-density polyethylene (HDPE) nanocomposite reinforced with polymethylsilsesquioxane HDPE (PMSQ–HDPE) nanoparticles, material constants for Christensen’s model were determined by the least squares optimization. The viscoelastic identification relative to the inflation test seemed to be the most appropriate for the numerical study of thermoforming of a thin PMSQ–HDPE part. For this purpose, the finite element method was considered. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rheology and Processing of Polymers)
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Open AccessArticle
Multiscale Structural Evolution and Its Relationship to Dielectric Properties of Micro-/Nano-Layer Coextruded PVDF-HFP/PC Films
Polymers 2020, 12(11), 2596; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12112596 - 05 Nov 2020
Abstract
An understanding of the structural evolution in micro-/nano-layer co-extrusion process is essential to fabricate high-performance multilayered products. Therefore, in this work, we reveal systematically the multiscale structural development, involving both the layer architecture and microstructure within layers of micro-/nano-layer coextruded polymer films, as [...] Read more.
An understanding of the structural evolution in micro-/nano-layer co-extrusion process is essential to fabricate high-performance multilayered products. Therefore, in this work, we reveal systematically the multiscale structural development, involving both the layer architecture and microstructure within layers of micro-/nano-layer coextruded polymer films, as well as its relationship to dielectric properties, based on poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP)/polycarbonate (PC) system. Interestingly, layer architecture and morphology show strong dependences on the nominal layer thicknesses. Particularly, with layer thickness reduced to nanometer scale, interfacial instabilities triggered by viscoelastic differences between components emerge with the creation of micro-droplets and micro-sheets. Films show an enhanced crystallization with the formation of two-dimensional (2D) spherulites in microlayer coextruded systems and the oriented in-plane lamellae in nanolayer coextruded counterparts, where layer breakup in the thinner layers further changes the crystallization behaviors. These macro- and microscopic structures, developed from the co-extrusion process, substantially influence the dielectric properties of coextruded films. Mechanism responsible for dielectric performance is further proposed by considering these effects of multiscale structure on the dipole switching and charge hopping in the multilayered structures. This work clearly demonstrates how the multiscale structural evolution during the micro-/nano-layer coextrusion process can control the dielectric properties of multilayered products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rheology and Processing of Polymers)
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of Hydrothermal Aging of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polycarbonate Composites on Mechanical Performance and Sand Erosion Resistance
Polymers 2020, 12(11), 2453; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12112453 - 23 Oct 2020
Abstract
Carbon fiber reinforced polycarbonate (CF/PC) composites have attracted attention for their excellent performances. However, their performances are greatly affected by environmental factors. In this work, the composites were exposed to hydrothermal aging to investigate the effects of a hot and humid environment. The [...] Read more.
Carbon fiber reinforced polycarbonate (CF/PC) composites have attracted attention for their excellent performances. However, their performances are greatly affected by environmental factors. In this work, the composites were exposed to hydrothermal aging to investigate the effects of a hot and humid environment. The mechanical properties of CF/PC composites with different aging times (0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42 days) were analyzed. It was demonstrated that the storage modulus of CF/PC composites with hot water aged for seven days has the highest value in this sampling period and frequency. Through the solid particle erosion experiment, it was found that the hydrothermal aging causes the deviation of the maximum erosion angle of composites, indicating the composites underwent ductile–brittle transformation. Furthermore, the crack and cavity resulting from the absorption of water was observed via the scanning electron microscope (SEM). This suggested that the hydrothermal aging leads to the plasticization and degradation of CF/PC composites, resulting in a reduction of corrosion resistance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rheology and Processing of Polymers)
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Open AccessArticle
TPV: A New Insight on the Rubber Morphology and Mechanic/Elastic Properties
Polymers 2020, 12(10), 2315; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12102315 - 10 Oct 2020
Abstract
The objective of this work is to study the influence of the ratio between the elastomer (EPDM) phase and the thermoplastic phase (PP) in thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPVs) as well as the associated morphology of the compression set of the material. First, from a [...] Read more.
The objective of this work is to study the influence of the ratio between the elastomer (EPDM) phase and the thermoplastic phase (PP) in thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPVs) as well as the associated morphology of the compression set of the material. First, from a study of the literature, it is concluded that the rubber phase must be dispersed with a large distribution of the domain size in the thermoplastic phase in order to achieve a high concentration, i.e., a maximal packing fraction close to ~0.80. From this discussion, it is inferred that a certain degree of progress in the crosslinking reaction must be reached when the thermoplastic phase is melted during mixing in order to achieve dispersion of the elastomeric phase in the thermoplastic matrix under maximum stress. In terms of elasticity recovery which is measured from the compression set experiment, it is observed that the crosslinking agent nature (DCP or phenolic resin) has no influence in the case of a TPV compared with a pure crosslinked EPDM system. Then, the TPV morphology and the rubber phase concentration are the first order parameters in the compression set of TPVs. Finally, the addition of carbon black fillers leads to an improvement of the mechanical properties at break for the low PP concentration (20%). However, the localization of carbon black depends on the crosslinking chemistry nature. With radical chemistry by organic peroxide decomposition, carbon black is located at the interface of EPDM and PP acting as a compatibilizer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rheology and Processing of Polymers)
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Open AccessArticle
Design and Synthesis of Polysiloxane Based Side Chain Liquid Crystal Polymer for Improving the Processability and Toughness of Magnesium Hydrate/Linear Low-Density Polyethylene Composites
Polymers 2020, 12(4), 911; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12040911 - 14 Apr 2020
Abstract
In this study, a polysiloxane grafted by thermotropic liquid crystal polymer (PSCTLCP) is designed and synthesized to effectively improve the processability and toughness of magnesium hydroxide (MH)/linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) composites. The obtained PSCTLCP is a nematic liquid crystal polymer; the liquid crystal [...] Read more.
In this study, a polysiloxane grafted by thermotropic liquid crystal polymer (PSCTLCP) is designed and synthesized to effectively improve the processability and toughness of magnesium hydroxide (MH)/linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) composites. The obtained PSCTLCP is a nematic liquid crystal polymer; the liquid crystal phase exists in a temperature range of 170 to 275 °C, and its initial thermal decomposition temperature is as high as 279.6 °C, which matches the processing temperature of MH/LLDPE composites. With the increase of PSCTLCP loading, the balance melt torque of MH/LLDPE/PSCTLCP composites is gradually decreased by 42% at 5 wt % PSCTLCP loading. Moreover, the power law index of MH/LLDPE/PSCTLCP composite melt is smaller than 1, but gradually increased with PSCTLCP, the flowing activation energy of PSCTLCP-1.0 is lower than that of MH/LLDPE at the same shear rate, indicating that the sensitivity of apparent melt viscosity of the composites to shear rate and to temperature is decreased with the increase of PSCTLCP, and the processing window is broadened by the addition of PSCTLCP. Besides, the elongation at break of MH/LLDPE/PSCTLCP composites increases from 6.85% of the baseline MH/LLDPE to 17.66% at 3 wt % PSCTLCP loading. All the results indicate that PSCTLCP can significantly improve the processability and toughness of MH/LLDPE composites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rheology and Processing of Polymers)
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Open AccessArticle
Comparison of the Foamability of Linear and Long-Chain Branched Polypropylene—The Legend of Strain-Hardening as a Requirement for Good Foamability
Polymers 2020, 12(3), 725; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12030725 - 24 Mar 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Polypropylene (PP) is an outstanding material for polymeric foams due to its favorable mechanical and chemical properties. However, its low melt strength and fast crystallization result in unfavorable foaming properties. Long-chain branching of PP is regarded as a game changer in foaming due [...] Read more.
Polypropylene (PP) is an outstanding material for polymeric foams due to its favorable mechanical and chemical properties. However, its low melt strength and fast crystallization result in unfavorable foaming properties. Long-chain branching of PP is regarded as a game changer in foaming due to the introduction of strain hardening, which stabilizes the foam morphology. In this work, a thorough characterization with respect to rheology and crystallization characteristics of a linear PP, a PP/PE-block co-polymer, and a long-chain branched PP are conducted. Using these results, the processing window in foam-extrusion trials with CO2 and finally the foam properties are explained. Although only LCB-PP exhibits strain hardening, it neither provide the broadest foaming window nor the best foam quality. Therefore, multiwave experiments were conducted to study the gelation due to crystallization and its influence on foaming. Here, linear PP exhibited a gel-like behavior over a broad time frame, whereas the other two froze quickly. Thus, apart from strain hardening, the crystallization behavior/crystallization kinetics is of utmost importance for foaming in terms of a broad processing window, low-density, and good morphology. Therefore, the question arises, whether strain hardening is really essential for low density foams with a good cellular morphology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rheology and Processing of Polymers)
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