Rheology and Processing of Polymers II

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Processing and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 June 2024 | Viewed by 3610

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Ingénierie des Matériaux Polymères, IMP UMR CNRS 5223, Lyon, France
Interests: rheology and flow; linear and nonlinear rheology; polymers and composites; polymer processing; multilayer; coextrusion; modeling; multiphase polymeric systems; biopolymers; biocomposites; composites
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
CNRS, UMR 5223, Ingénierie des Matériaux Polymères, INSA Lyon, Université de Lyon, F-69621 Villeurbanne, France
Interests: viscoelasticity; rheology; rheology and process engineering of polymer materials, biopolymers and their composites; interfacial phenomena in the polymer and composites processing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are welcoming submissions to the second issue of “Rheology and Processing of Polymers”. Due to the great interest in the first issue and the considerable number of views and downloads of the papers published, the Editorial Office decided to reopen this Special Issue to focus on technologies currently emerging in the field of rheology and polymer processing. 

This Special Issue will cover the latest developments in the field of rheology and polymer processing, and highlight cutting-edge research focusing on the processing of advanced polymers and their composites. It will demonstrate that the field of “Rheology and Polymer Processing” is still gaining increased attention. This Special Issue promises to maintain a good balance of papers to serve the attendees from academia and industry. It will provide cutting-edge research results and the latest developments in the field of polymer science and engineering, their innovative processing, biopolymers, and characterization, polymer-based products, polymer physics, composites, modeling and simulations, and rheology. Ideally, contributions should focus on fundamental and experimental results in a thematic range that comprises conventional processing technologies as well as innovative processing and materials-based macromolecular research. The issue will compile the current state-of-the-art and highlight the range of applications. Both original contributions and reviews are welcome.

The following keywords cover all related topics:

  • Polymer processing;
  • Rheology;
  • Polymers;
  • Natural polymers and biopolymers;
  • Biopolymers;
  • Polymer nanocomposites;
  • Advanced polymers;
  • Composites and biocomposites;
  • Biocomposites;
  • Modeling;
  • Numerical simulation;
  • Polymer physics;
  • Innovative processing;
  • Polymer melts;
  • Polymer engineering;
  • Recycling

Prof. Dr. Khalid Lamnawar
Prof. Dr. Abderrahim Maazouz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 3565 KiB  
Article
Biaxial Orientation of PLA/PBAT/Thermoplastic Cereal Flour Sheets: Structure–Processing–Property Relationships
by Nour Jaouadi, Racha Al-Itry, Abderrahim Maazouz and Khalid Lamnawar
Polymers 2023, 15(9), 2068; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15092068 - 26 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1459
Abstract
This paper investigates the biaxial stretchability of polylactic acid (PLA)/poly (butylene adipate co-terephthalate) (PBAT)/thermoplastic cereal flour (TCF) ternary blends with a PLA/PBAT ratio close to 60/40 and a constant TCF content. A twin-screw extrusion process was used to gelatinize the starch and devolatilize [...] Read more.
This paper investigates the biaxial stretchability of polylactic acid (PLA)/poly (butylene adipate co-terephthalate) (PBAT)/thermoplastic cereal flour (TCF) ternary blends with a PLA/PBAT ratio close to 60/40 and a constant TCF content. A twin-screw extrusion process was used to gelatinize the starch and devolatilize the water in order to obtain a water-free TCF, which was then blended into a compatibilized or non-compatibilized PLA/PBAT matrix, introduced in the molten state. These blends were subsequently cast into sheets and biaxially drawn using a biaxial laboratory stretcher. The prepared ternary blends were found to present a typical ductile behavior. Scanning electron micrography highlighted dispersion and adhesion properties in the PLA/PBAT/TCF blends, where two different phases were observed. Moreover, the addition of the thermoplastic cereal flour did not significantly affect the biaxial stretchability of the PLA/PBAT blends but was found to lower the maximum stress before breaking. The modification of the interfacial tension between PLA and PBAT with the compatibilizer Joncryl before mixing with TCF had no effect on the durability of the PLA/PBAT/TCF sheet. Still, it slightly increased the maximum of nominal stress before failure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rheology and Processing of Polymers II)
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22 pages, 7118 KiB  
Article
Study of Morphology, Rheology, and Dynamic Properties toward Unveiling the Partial Miscibility in Poly(lactic acid)—Poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) Blends
by Hu Qiao, Abderrahim Maazouz and Khalid Lamnawar
Polymers 2022, 14(24), 5359; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14245359 - 7 Dec 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1746
Abstract
The purpose of the present work was to gain a fundamental understanding of how the composition and physico-chemical properties affect the rheology, morphology, miscibility, and thermal stability of poly(lactic acid) (PLA)—poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) biopolymer blends obtained by melt mixing. First, restricted processing conditions were [...] Read more.
The purpose of the present work was to gain a fundamental understanding of how the composition and physico-chemical properties affect the rheology, morphology, miscibility, and thermal stability of poly(lactic acid) (PLA)—poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) biopolymer blends obtained by melt mixing. First, restricted processing conditions were chosen, due to the inherent thermal degradation of PHBV, as proven by rheological dynamic time sweep (DTS) measurements and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). Based on this, the composition dependence of the blends was investigated using small-amplitude oscillatory shear rheology (SAOS), and the results were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Subsequently, the changes in glass transition temperatures (Tgs) from the molten to the solid state, as observed by DMA and DSC, were verified by coupling SAOS to dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (DRS). Herein, the thermo-rheological complexity of PLA/PHBV blends in the melt was revealed, especially for PLA-rich blends. Irregularly structured morphologies, caused by highly mismatched viscoelastic properties, illustrated the degree of partial miscibility. Moreover, the thermo-rheological complexity appeared in the molten state of the asymmetric PLA-rich phases could be correlated to the crystal-amorphous interfacial MWS polarization, because of the locally-induced phase separation and heterogeneity, and owing to the differences in their crystallization properties during cooling. The miscibility also suffered from the lower thermal stability of PLA and the even more unstable PHBV. Nevertheless, the melt-induced degradation process of the PLA/PHBV blends seemed to be responsible for some of the in situ self-compatibilization and plasticization mechanisms. As a result, the miscibility and thermo-rheological simplicity were improved for the intermediate and PHBV-rich compositions at low temperatures, since their properties were, to a large extent, governed by the significant degradation of PHBV. The present findings should increase the understanding of morphological changes in PLA/PHBV blends and help control their micro/nanostructure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rheology and Processing of Polymers II)
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