Special Issue "Carbon Materials Modified Polymeric Composites"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Synthesis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Mithilesh Yadav
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan
Interests: graftcopolymer; biopolymer membrane; polymer nanocomposites; polymer blends; food packaging materials
Prof. Fang-Chyou Chiu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333302, Taiwan
Interests: Polymer Physics; Polymer Blends; Polymeric Nano-Materials; Bio-Polymers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Carbon-based nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, activated carbon, and graphite have been used as energy materials because of their exclusive properties. These materials can be used in drug delivery, electronics, composite materials, sensors, field emission devices, energy storage and conversion thanks to their outstanding chemical, mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. The combination of carbon-based nanomaterials and polymers is very important for engineering applications because of the good thermo-mechanical properties of the composites. The properties of carbon–polymer composites are enhanced as a result of the interaction between the polymer matrix and the reinforcing nanofiller. These carbon–polymer composites have been used in lightweight crafts, energy storage devices, conductive glue, sensors, gas storage devices, and for defense purposes.

This Special Issue invites manuscripts reporting on the synthesis, characterization, physico-chemical properties, and applications of filler–polymer composites. Research articles, reviews, and communications are welcomed.

Dr. Mithilesh Yadav
Prof. Fang-Chyou Chiu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Cellulose Nanocrystal Reinforced Chitosan Based UV Barrier Composite Films for Sustainable Packaging
Polymers 2020, 12(1), 202; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12010202 (registering DOI) - 13 Jan 2020
Abstract
In this study, green composite films based on cellulose nanocrystal/chitosan (CNC/CS) were fabricated by solution casting. FTIR, XRD, SEM, and TEM characterizations were conducted to determine the structure and morphology of the prepared films. The addition of only 4 wt.% CNC in the [...] Read more.
In this study, green composite films based on cellulose nanocrystal/chitosan (CNC/CS) were fabricated by solution casting. FTIR, XRD, SEM, and TEM characterizations were conducted to determine the structure and morphology of the prepared films. The addition of only 4 wt.% CNC in the CS film improved the tensile strength and Young’s modulus by up to 39% and 78%, respectively. Depending on CNC content, the moisture absorption decreased by 34.1–24.2% and the water solubility decreased by 35.7–26.5% for the composite films compared with neat CS film. The water vapor permeation decreased from 3.83 × 10−11 to 2.41 × 10−11 gm−1 s−1Pa−1 in the CS-based films loaded with (0–8 wt.%) CNC. The water and UV barrier properties of the composite films showed better performance than those of neat CS film. Results suggested that CNC/CS nanocomposite films can be used as a sustainable packaging material in the food industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Materials Modified Polymeric Composites)
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Open AccessArticle
Polyamide 6/Poly(vinylidene fluoride) Blend-Based Nanocomposites with Enhanced Rigidity: Selective Localization of Carbon Nanotube and Organoclay
Polymers 2020, 12(1), 184; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12010184 - 10 Jan 2020
Abstract
Polyamide 6 (PA6)/poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) blend-based nanocomposites were successfully prepared using a twin screw extruder. Carbon nanotube (CNT) and organo-montmorillonite (30B) were used individually and simultaneously as reinforcing nanofillers for the immiscible PA6/PVDF blend. Scanning electron micrographs showed that adding 30B reduced the [...] Read more.
Polyamide 6 (PA6)/poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) blend-based nanocomposites were successfully prepared using a twin screw extruder. Carbon nanotube (CNT) and organo-montmorillonite (30B) were used individually and simultaneously as reinforcing nanofillers for the immiscible PA6/PVDF blend. Scanning electron micrographs showed that adding 30B reduced the dispersed domain size of PVDF in the blend, and CNT played a vital role in the formation of a quasi-co-continuous PA6-PVDF morphology. Transmission electron microscopy observation revealed that both fillers were mainly located in the PA6 matrix phase. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the presence of 30B facilitated the formation of γ-form PA6 crystals in the composites. Differential scanning calorimetry results indicated that the crystallization temperature of PA6 increased after adding CNT into the blend. The inclusion of 30B retarded PA6 nucleation (γ-form crystals growth) upon crystallization. The Young’s and flexural moduli of the blend increased after adding CNT and/or 30B. 30B exhibited higher enhancing efficiency compared with CNT. The composite with 2 phr 30B exhibited 21% higher Young’s modulus than the blend. Measurements of the rheological properties confirmed the development of a pseudo-network structure in the CNT-loaded composites. Double percolation morphology in the PA6/PVDF blend was achieved with the addition of CNT. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Materials Modified Polymeric Composites)
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Open AccessArticle
Friction and Wear Performance of Staple Carbon Fabric-Reinforced Composites: Effects of Surface Topography
Polymers 2020, 12(1), 141; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12010141 (registering DOI) - 06 Jan 2020
Abstract
Here, staple carbon fiber fabric-reinforced polycarbonate (PC)- and epoxy (EP)-based composites with different impregnating resin levels were fabricated using a modified film stacking process. The effects of surface topographies and resin types on the tribological properties of stable carbon fabric composites (sCFC) were [...] Read more.
Here, staple carbon fiber fabric-reinforced polycarbonate (PC)- and epoxy (EP)-based composites with different impregnating resin levels were fabricated using a modified film stacking process. The effects of surface topographies and resin types on the tribological properties of stable carbon fabric composites (sCFC) were investigated. Friction and wear tests on the carbon composites were conducted under unlubricated sliding using a disk-on-disk wear test machine. Experimental results showed that the coefficient of friction (COF) of the sCFC was dominated by matrix type, followed by peak material portion (Smr1) values, and finalized with core height (Sk) values. The COF of composites decreased by increasing the sliding speed and applied pressure. This also relied on surface topography and temperature generated at the worn surface. However, the specific wear rate was strongly affected by resin impregnation. Partially-impregnated composites showed lower specific wear rate, whereas fully-impregnated composites showed a higher wear rate. This substantially increased by increasing the sliding speed and applied pressure. Scanning electron microscopy observations of the worn surfaces revealed that the primary wear mechanisms were abrasion, adhesion, and fatigue for PC-based composites. For EP-based composites, this was primarily abrasion and fatigue. Results proved that partially-impregnated composites exhibited better tribological properties under severe conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Materials Modified Polymeric Composites)
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Open AccessArticle
Preparation of Boron Nitride-Coated Carbon Fibers and Synergistic Improvement of Thermal Conductivity in Their Polypropylene-Matrix Composites
Polymers 2019, 11(12), 2009; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11122009 - 04 Dec 2019
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to prepare boron nitride (BN)-coated carbon fibers (CF) and to investigate the properties of as-prepared fibers as well as the effect of coating on their respective polymer–matrix composites. A sequence of solution dipping and heat treatment was [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study is to prepare boron nitride (BN)-coated carbon fibers (CF) and to investigate the properties of as-prepared fibers as well as the effect of coating on their respective polymer–matrix composites. A sequence of solution dipping and heat treatment was performed to blanket the CFs with a BN microlayer. The CFs were first dipped in a boric acid solution and then annealed in an ammonia–nitrogen mixed gas atmosphere for nitriding. The presence of BN on the CF surface was confirmed using FTIR, XPS, and SEM analyses. Polypropylene was reinforced with BN–CFs as the first filler and graphite flake as the secondary filler. The composite characterization indicates approximately 60% improvement in through-plane thermal conductivity and about 700% increase in the electrical resistivity of samples containing BN-CFs at 20 phr. An increase of two orders of magnitude in the electrical resistivity of BN–CF monofilaments was also observed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Materials Modified Polymeric Composites)
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