Advances in Biocompatible and Biodegradable Polymers III

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomacromolecules, Biobased and Biodegradable Polymers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 6143

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Technological Institute of Materials (ITM), Universitat Politècnica de València, Plaza Ferrandiz y Carbonell s/n, Alcoy, Alicante, Spain
Interests: biodegradable polymers; recycling; natural additives; biocomposites; polymer compatibilization; polymer rheology;surface modification fillers; thermal and mechanical properties
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Technological Institute of Materials (ITM), Universitat Politècnica de València, Plaza Ferrandiz y Carbonell s/n, Alcoy, Alicante, Spain
Interests: mechanical properties; polymers; composites; surface modification; biodegradable and biocompatible polymers; atmospheric plasma
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Research Institute for Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety (ISIRYM), Universitat Politècnica de València, Plaza Ferrandiz y Carbonell s/n, Alcoy, Alicante, Spain
Interests: biopolymers; biomass revalorization; PHA and PHB production; chemical recycling; biodegradable polymers; natural additives; polymer rheology; surface modification fillers; polymer membranes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Among the various strategies to reduce negative environmental impacts due to the uncontrolled consumption and low recovery of conventional plastics, the synthesis of new biodegradable and recyclable plastics is considered one of the most promising. The spectrum of existing biodegradable materials is still very narrow, and so, to achieve greater applicability, mixtures of biodegradable polymers are being investigated using a blending strategy. However, the incompatibilities shown by these mixtures have led to the establishment of several strategies (incorporation of additives, reactive extrusion, copolymerization) to improve this feature. 

This Special Issue of Polymers invites contributions that address advances in the synthesis of new biodegradable polymers, new mixtures of biodegradable polymers and, in particular, compatibility studies, as well as those exploring the influence on their chemical, thermal, mechanical and rheological properties. In addition, we welcome research on the biocompatibility of polymers with the human body, including studies on the degradation of physiological serum, and the influence of their mechanical and thermal properties depending on the time of contact with physiological serum.

Dr. José Miguel Ferri
Dr. Vicent Fombuena Borràs
Prof. Dr. María Fernanda López Pérez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biodegradable polymers
  • biocompatible polymers
  • compatibility
  • blends
  • disintegration
  • polymer miscibility

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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18 pages, 7744 KiB  
Article
Preparation and Preliminary Analysis of Several Nanoformulations Based on Plant Extracts and Biodegradable Polymers as a Possible Application for Chronic Venous Disease Therapy
by Andreea Roxana Ungureanu, Emma Adriana Ozon, Adina Magdalena Musuc, Mihai Anastasescu, Irina Atkinson, Raul-Augustin Mitran, Adriana Rusu, Liliana Popescu and Cerasela Elena Gîrd
Polymers 2024, 16(10), 1362; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym16101362 - 10 May 2024
Viewed by 669
Abstract
Nanotechnology is one of the newest directions for plant-based therapies. Chronic venous disease often predisposes to long-term and invasive treatment. This research focused on the inclusion of vegetal extracts from Sophorae flos (SE), Calendulae flos (CE), and Ginkgo bilobae folium (GE) in formulations [...] Read more.
Nanotechnology is one of the newest directions for plant-based therapies. Chronic venous disease often predisposes to long-term and invasive treatment. This research focused on the inclusion of vegetal extracts from Sophorae flos (SE), Calendulae flos (CE), and Ginkgo bilobae folium (GE) in formulations with PHB and PLGA polymers and their physicochemical characterization as a preliminary stage for possible use in the development of a complex therapeutic product. The samples were prepared by an oil–water emulsification and solvent evaporation technique, resulting in suspensions with high spreadability and a pH of 5.5. ATR-FTIR analysis revealed bands for stretching vibrations (O-H, C=O, and C-H in symmetric and asymmetric methyl and methylene) in the same regions as the base components, but switched to high or low wavenumbers and absorbance, highlighting the formation of adducts/complexes between the extracts and polymers. The obtained formulations were in the amorphous phase, as confirmed by XRD analysis. AFM analysis emphasized the morphological peculiarities of the extract–polymer nanoformulations. It could be noticed that, in the case of SE-based formulations, the dominant characteristics for SE-PHB and SE-PLGA composition were the formation of random large (SE-PHB) and smaller uniform (SE-PLGA) particles; further on, these particles tended to aggregate in the case of SE-PHB-PLGA. For the CE- and GE-based formulations, the dominant surface morphology was their porosity, generally with small pores, but larger cavities were observed in some cases (CE- and GE-PHB). The highest roughness values at the (8 µm × 8 μm) scale were found for the following samples and succession: CE-PHB < SE-PLGA < SE-PHB-PLGA. In addition, by thermogravimetric analysis, impregnation in the matrix of compression stockings was evaluated, which varied in the following order: CE-polymer > SE-polymer > GE-polymer. In conclusion, nine vegetal extract–polymer nanoformulations were prepared and preliminarily characterized (by advanced physicochemical methods) as a starting point for further optimization, stability studies, and possible use in complex pharmaceutical products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Biocompatible and Biodegradable Polymers III)
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15 pages, 3796 KiB  
Article
Magnetic Resonance-Based Analytical Tools to Study Polyvinylpyrrolidone–Hydroxyapatite Composites
by Alina Petrova, Georgy Mamin, Oleg Gnezdilov, Inna Fadeeva, Olga Antonova, Anna Forysenkova, Iulian V. Antoniac, Julietta V. Rau and Marat Gafurov
Polymers 2023, 15(22), 4445; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15224445 - 17 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1664
Abstract
The synthesis of biocompatible and bioresorbable composite materials, such as a “polymer matrix-mineral constituent,” stimulating the natural growth of living tissues and the restoration of damaged parts of the body, is one of the challenging problems in regenerative medicine and materials science. Composite [...] Read more.
The synthesis of biocompatible and bioresorbable composite materials, such as a “polymer matrix-mineral constituent,” stimulating the natural growth of living tissues and the restoration of damaged parts of the body, is one of the challenging problems in regenerative medicine and materials science. Composite films of bioresorbable polymer of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and hydroxyapatite (HA) were obtained. HA was synthesized in situ in the polymer solution. We applied electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) approaches to study the composite films’ properties. The application of EPR in two frequency ranges allowed us to derive spectroscopic parameters of the nitrogen-based light and radiation-induced paramagnetic centers in HA, PVP and PVP-HA with high accuracy. It was shown that PVP did not significantly affect the EPR spectral and relaxation parameters of the radiation-induced paramagnetic centers in HA, while light-induced centers were detected only in PVP. Magic angle spinning (MAS) 1H NMR showed the presence of two signals at 4.7 ppm and −2.15 ppm, attributed to “free” water and hydroxyl groups, while the single line was attributed to 31P. NMR relaxation measurements for 1H and 31P showed that the relaxation decays were multicomponent processes that can be described by three components of the transverse relaxation times. The obtained results demonstrated that the applied magnetic resonance methods can be used for the quality control of PVP-HA composites and, potentially, for the development of analytical tools to follow the processes of sample treatment, resorption, and degradation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Biocompatible and Biodegradable Polymers III)
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16 pages, 10379 KiB  
Article
Green, Eco-Friendly, Highly Biocompatible and Bioactive Nanocomposite-Based Biopolymers Loaded with ZnO@Fe3O4 Nanoparticles
by Ayed S. Allogmani, Roushdy M. Mohamed and Mohamed S. Hasanin
Polymers 2023, 15(17), 3641; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15173641 - 4 Sep 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1152
Abstract
Biocompatibility is a major concern for promising multifunctional bioactive materials. Unfortunately, bioactive materials lack biocompatibility in some respects, so active ingredient formulations are urgently needed. Bimetallic nanoparticles have demonstrated drawbacks in stabilized biocompatible formulations. This study examined the preparation of biomaterial-based multifunctional biopolymers [...] Read more.
Biocompatibility is a major concern for promising multifunctional bioactive materials. Unfortunately, bioactive materials lack biocompatibility in some respects, so active ingredient formulations are urgently needed. Bimetallic nanoparticles have demonstrated drawbacks in stabilized biocompatible formulations. This study examined the preparation of biomaterial-based multifunctional biopolymers via an eco-friendly formulation method using ultrasound. Bimetallic zinc oxide/iron oxide (magnetic form) nanoparticles (ZnO@Fe3O4NPs) were formulated using casein and starch as capping agents and stabilizers. The formulated nanocomposite was characterized using ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). Herein, the formulated nanocomposite was shown to have a thermally stable nanostructure, and the bimetallic ZnO@Fe3O4 NPs were measured as 85 nm length and 13 nm width. Additionally, the biocompatibility test showed its excellent cytocompatibility with Wi 38 and Vero normal cell lines, with IC50 550 and 650 mg/mL, respectively. Moreover, the antimicrobial activity was noted against six pathogens that are represent to the most common pathogenic microbes, with the time required for killing of bacteria and unicellular fungi being 19 h and 61 h for filamentous fungi with remarket an excellent antioxidant activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Biocompatible and Biodegradable Polymers III)
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Review

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18 pages, 2300 KiB  
Review
Recent Approaches to the Plasticization of Poly(lactic Acid) (PLA) (A Review)
by Elena E. Mastalygina and Kristine V. Aleksanyan
Polymers 2024, 16(1), 87; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym16010087 - 27 Dec 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1997
Abstract
Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) is a polyester attracting growing interest every year in different application fields, such as packaging, cosmetics, food, medicine, etc. Despite its significant advantages, it has low elasticity that may hinder further development and a corresponding rise in volume of consumption. [...] Read more.
Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) is a polyester attracting growing interest every year in different application fields, such as packaging, cosmetics, food, medicine, etc. Despite its significant advantages, it has low elasticity that may hinder further development and a corresponding rise in volume of consumption. This review opens a discussion of basic approaches to PLA plasticization. These considerations include copolymerization and blending with flexible polymers, introducing oligomers and low-molecular additives, as well as structural modification. It was demonstrated that each approach has its advantages, such as simplicity and low cost, but with disadvantages, including complex processing and the need for additional reagents. According to the analysis of different approaches, it was concluded that the optimal option is the application of copolymers as the additives obtained via reactive mixing to PLA and its blends with other polymers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Biocompatible and Biodegradable Polymers III)
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