Special Issue "Plant-Fungal Pathogen Interaction"

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Protection".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Antonia Carlucci
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Sciences of Agriculture, Food and Environment (SAFE), University of Foggia, 71122 Foggia, Italy
Interests: Mycologia, fungal genetic; fungal taxonomy; Plant pathology; wood pathogens; horticultural pathogens; fungal biodiversity; antagonistic microrganisms; crop protection
Dr. Maria Luisa Raimondo

Guest Editor
Department of Sciences of Agriculture, Food and Environment (SAFE), University of Foggia, 71122 Foggia, Italy
Interests: Mycologia; fungal genetic; fungal taxonomy; Plant pathology; wood pathogens; horticultural pathogens; fungal biodiversity; antagonistic microrganisms; crop protection

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Research on the interactions between plants and phytopathogenic fungi are very interesting because the knowledge of specific mechanisms allow us to obtain findings that contribute to the development of new strategies of plant and crop protection. Scientific insights into parasitization strategies employed by the phytopathogenic fungi, the action of phytotoxins, the compatibility of pathogens with host plants and the basic resistance of non-host plants, as well as the cultivar-specific resistance of host plants, represent important aspects of fungal pathogen–host interactions. Studies carried out on the abilities of specific biological compounds and/or antagonistic microorganisms to improve the defense response from plants, fruits, and vegetables such as food commodities is a crucial topic to implement and develop new protection means for consumer benefit.

Therefore, in this Special Issue, articles (original research papers, perspectives, hypotheses, opinions, reviews, modeling approaches, and methods) that focus on plant–fungal pathogen interactions and the kinds of mechanisms carried out are welcome.

Dr. Antonia Carlucci
Dr. Maria Luisa Raimondo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • plant–fungal pathogen interaction
  • fungal and bacterial antagonism
  • fungal and bacterial pathogens
  • phytotoxins
  • parasitization

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Influence of the Dilution Rate on the Aggressiveness of Inocula and the Expression of Resistance against Fusarium Head Blight in Wheat
Plants 2020, 9(8), 943; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9080943 - 25 Jul 2020
Abstract
In previous research, conidium concentrations varying between 10,000 and 1,000,000/mL have not been related to any aggressiveness test. Therefore, two Fusarium graminearum and two Fusarium culmorum isolates were tested in the field on seven genotypes highly differing in resistance at no dilution, and [...] Read more.
In previous research, conidium concentrations varying between 10,000 and 1,000,000/mL have not been related to any aggressiveness test. Therefore, two Fusarium graminearum and two Fusarium culmorum isolates were tested in the field on seven genotypes highly differing in resistance at no dilution, and 1:1, 1:2, 1:4, 1:8, and 1:16 dilutions in two years (2013 and 2014). The isolates showed different aggressiveness, which changed significantly at different dilution rates for disease index (DI), Fusarium-damaged kernels (FDK), and deoxynivalenol (DON). The traits also had diverging responses to the infection. The effect of the dilution could not be forecasted. The genotype ranks also varied. Dilution seldomly increased aggressiveness, but often lower aggressiveness occurred at high variation. The maximum and minimum values varied between 15% and 40% for traits and dilutions. The reductions between the non-diluted and diluted values (total means) for DI ranged from 6% and 33%, for FDK 8.3–37.7%, and for DON 5.8–44.8%. The most sensitive and most important trait was DON. The introduction of the aggressiveness test provides improved regulation compared to the uncontrolled manipulation of the conidium concentration. The use of more isolates significantly increases the credibility of phenotyping in genetic and cultivar registration studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Fungal Pathogen Interaction)
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Open AccessArticle
Comparative Analyses of Four Chemicals Used to Control Black Mold Disease in Tomato and Its Effects on Defense Signaling Pathways, Productivity and Quality Traits
Plants 2020, 9(7), 808; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9070808 - 28 Jun 2020
Abstract
The field application of safe chemical inducers plays a vital role in the stimulation of systematic acquired resistance (SAR) of plants. In this study, the efficacy use of three and six field applications with chitosan, lithovit, and K-thiosulfate at 4 g L−1 [...] Read more.
The field application of safe chemical inducers plays a vital role in the stimulation of systematic acquired resistance (SAR) of plants. In this study, the efficacy use of three and six field applications with chitosan, lithovit, and K-thiosulfate at 4 g L−1 and salicylic acid at 1.5 g L−1 in improving tomato productivity, quality, and modifying the defense signaling pathways to the Alternaria alternata infection was investigated. Salicylic acid was the most effective in vitro where it completely inhibited the growth of Alternaria alternata. The highest yield quantity was recorded with six applications with Chitosan followed by Salicylic acid; also, they were the most effective treatments in controlling the Alternaria alternata infection in tomato fruits. The maximum increase in chitinase and catalase activity of tomato fruits was observed at five days after inoculation, following treatment with six sprays of salicylic acid followed by chitosan. The transcript levels of seven defense-related genes: ethylene-responsive transcription factor 3 (RAP), xyloglucan endotransglucosylase 2 (XET-2), catalytic hydrolase -2 (ACS-2), proteinase inhibitor II (PINII), phenylalanine ammonia-lyase 5 (PAL5), lipoxygenase D (LOXD), and pathogenesis-related protein 1 (PR1) were upregulated in response to all treatments. The highest expression levels of the seven studied genes were recorded in response to six foliar applications with chitosan. Chitosan followed by salicylic acid was the most effective among the tested elicitors in controlling the black mold rot in tomato fruits. In conclusion, pre-harvest chitosan and salicylic acid in vivo application with six sprays could be recommended as effective safe alternatives to fungicides against black mold disease in tomato fruits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Fungal Pathogen Interaction)
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