Special Issue "Effects of Soil on Plants Physiology"

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Physiology and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Lorenzo Rossi
Website
Guest Editor
Horticultural Sciences Department, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS), Indian River Research and Education Center (IRREC), Fort Pierce, FL 34945, USA
Interests: root anatomy; soil contaminants; plant physiology; root-soil interaction; stress physiology; root growth and development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Global food demands are expected to grow by 70%–110% by 2050, while arable lands are decreasing due to land degradation, urbanization, and seawater intrusion. Global climate change further aggravates the problem, especially in arid and semi-arid regions, by forcing farmers to use marginal land for their production. In addition, emerging contaminants, microplastics, engineered nanoparticles, and heavy metals represent new threats to cultivates species. The synergistic effects of different soil types and emerging contaminants with different environmental stresses (e.g., salinity, drought, flooding) on plant and root health have not been adequately explored. This Special Issue of Plants will highlight the interaction among soil heterogeneity, emerging contaminants, soil microbiome, and plant and root physiology. Topics include how cultivated species and their roots respond to different environments, including multiple interactions among microbes, mycorrhizae, soil heterogeneity, biogeochemical cycles, abiotic stresses, and emerging contaminants.

Prof. Dr. Lorenzo Rossi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • plant physiology
  • root growth and development
  • emerging contaminants
  • plant stress physiology
  • soil quality

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Impact of a Soil Conditioner Integrated into Fertilization Scheme on Orange and Lemon Seedling Physiological Performances
Plants 2020, 9(7), 812; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9070812 - 28 Jun 2020
Abstract
Growers in Florida face unique challenges regarding maintaining proper citrus nutrition. Poor draining soils with low fertility, low C.E.C., and high rates of leaching are common in this region. In response to these challenges, interest has grown in products labeled as soil conditioners. [...] Read more.
Growers in Florida face unique challenges regarding maintaining proper citrus nutrition. Poor draining soils with low fertility, low C.E.C., and high rates of leaching are common in this region. In response to these challenges, interest has grown in products labeled as soil conditioners. Using a completely randomized experimental design, this greenhouse study tested the effects of 5 different combinations of a traditional fertilizer (TF) and a new soil conditioner (SC) on lemon and orange seedling physiology. Eight-month-old ‘Bearss’ lemon and ‘Valencia’ sweet orange grafted on sour orange rootstocks were employed, and five repetitions were used for each treatment. Plant biomass (dry weight), height, stem diameter, chlorophyll content, stomatal conductance and nutrient uptake were analyzed after 120 days of treatment. The results show that SC has a positive impact upon both chlorophyll levels and stomatal conductance values in both orange and lemon seedlings. However, based on dry weight growth data, we can only conclude that the SC was effective for orange seedlings at 50% TF and 0.5% SC. Based on this short 120-day evaluation, the SC achieved positive growth promotion for orange (50% TF) but not for lemon seedlings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Soil on Plants Physiology)
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