Special Issue "Selected/Extended Full Papers of 14th International Rapeseed Congress"

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 March 2016).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Dilantha Fernando
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Plant Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2, Canada
Tel. 1-204-474-6072; Fax: +1 204 474 7528
Interests: canola and wheat pathology; epidemiology of plant pathogens; evolution/genetic variation of fungal pathogens; biological control of plant diseases; breeding for disease resistance microbial; ecology and microbial interactions
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Gary Peng
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Saskatoon Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, SK S7N 0X2, Canada
Fax: +1 306 956 7247
Interests: canola pathology: clubroot, blackleg, genetic variation of pathogens; biological control of plant diseases and weeds; disease resistance, and microbial interactions
Dr. Robert W. Duncan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Plant Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2, Canada
Tel. +1-204-474-6076
Interests: hybrid rapeseed/canola cultivar development; conventional and herbicide-tolerant rapeseed/canola breeding; improvement of rapeseed/canola end-use quality; breeding and genetics of disease resistance; brassica agronomic research
Dr. Janitha Wanasundara
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Saskatoon Research Centre, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 0X2, Canada
Tel. +1-306-385-9455
Interests: oilseeds; brassica seeds; seed proteins; protein structure; protein functionality
Ms. Lisa Campbell
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Oil Nutrition Research Manager, Canola Council of Canada, 400-167 Lombard Avenue, Winnipeg, MB, R3B 0T6, Canada
Tel. +1-204-982-2121; Fax: +1-204-942-1841
Dr. Rishi R. Burlakoti
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Scientist – Plant Pathology, Agassiz Research and Development Centre, 6947 Highway #7, P.O. Box 1000, Agassiz, British Columbia V0M 1A0, Canada
Interests: plant pathology; integrated disease management; plant disease epidemiology; host-parasite interaction; mycotoxin diversity; population genetics; molecular biology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue comprises selected/extended papers from the 14th International Rapeseed Congress (https://event-wizard.com/irc2015/0/welcome/) held in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, the most comprehensive forum for discussing advancement in the rapeseed/canola industry. The congress covers topics including advances in discovery sciences (e.g., genomics, molecular biology), plant breeding strategies, crop protection (from, for example, diseases, insects, weeds), climatic stress (e.g., drought, heat), seed quality and utilization, nutritional value of oil and meal, agronomy, crop management, and economic and policy issues (e.g., regulatory systems, international trade). Papers selected for this Special Issue will be subject to a rigorous peer-review procedure with the aim of rapid and wide dissemination of research results, developments, and applications.

Prof. Dr. Dilantha Fernando
Dr. Gary Peng
Dr. Robert W. Duncan
Dr. Janitha Wanasundara
Ms. Lisa Campbell
Dr. Rishi R. Burlakoti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

Open AccessArticle
Structural Properties of Cruciferin and Napin of Brassica napus (Canola) Show Distinct Responses to Changes in pH and Temperature
Plants 2016, 5(3), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants5030036 - 07 Sep 2016
Cited by 12
Abstract
The two major storage proteins identified in Brassica napus (canola) were isolated and studied for their molecular composition, structural characteristics and the responses of structural features to the changes in pH and temperature. Cruciferin, a complex of six monomers, has a predominantly β-sheet-containing [...] Read more.
The two major storage proteins identified in Brassica napus (canola) were isolated and studied for their molecular composition, structural characteristics and the responses of structural features to the changes in pH and temperature. Cruciferin, a complex of six monomers, has a predominantly β-sheet-containing secondary structure. This protein showed low pH unstable tertiary structure, and distinctly different solubility behaviour with pH when intact in the seed cellular matrix. Cruciferin structure unfolds at pH 3 even at ambient temperature. Temperature-induced structure unfolding was observed above the maximum denaturation temperature of cruciferin. Napin was soluble in a wider pH range than cruciferin and has α-helices dominating secondary structure. Structural features of napin showed less sensitivity to the changes in medium pH and temperature. The surface hydrophobicity (S0) and intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan residue appear to be good indicators of cruciferin unfolding, however they were not the best to demonstrate structural changes of napin. These two storage proteins of B. napus have distinct molecular characteristics, therefore properties and functionalities they provide are contrasting rather than complementary. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected/Extended Full Papers of 14th International Rapeseed Congress)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Blackleg (Leptosphaeria maculans) Severity and Yield Loss in Canola in Alberta, Canada
Plants 2016, 5(3), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants5030031 - 20 Jul 2016
Cited by 9
Abstract
Blackleg, caused by Leptosphaeria maculans, is an important disease of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) in Canada and throughout the world. Severe epidemics of blackleg can result in significant yield losses. Understanding disease-yield relationships is a prerequisite for measuring the agronomic [...] Read more.
Blackleg, caused by Leptosphaeria maculans, is an important disease of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) in Canada and throughout the world. Severe epidemics of blackleg can result in significant yield losses. Understanding disease-yield relationships is a prerequisite for measuring the agronomic efficacy and economic benefits of control methods. Field experiments were conducted in 2013, 2014, and 2015 to determine the relationship between blackleg disease severity and yield in a susceptible cultivar and in moderately resistant to resistant canola hybrids. Disease severity was lower, and seed yield was 120%–128% greater, in the moderately resistant to resistant hybrids compared with the susceptible cultivar. Regression analysis showed that pod number and seed yield declined linearly as blackleg severity increased. Seed yield per plant decreased by 1.8 g for each unit increase in disease severity, corresponding to a decline in yield of 17.2% for each unit increase in disease severity. Pyraclostrobin fungicide reduced disease severity in all site-years and increased yield. These results show that the reduction of blackleg in canola crops substantially improves yields. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected/Extended Full Papers of 14th International Rapeseed Congress)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Comparison between Canadian Canola Harvest and Export Surveys
Plants 2016, 5(3), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants5030030 - 20 Jul 2016
Abstract
Parameters, such as oil, protein, glucosinolates, chlorophyll content and fatty acid composition, were determined using reference methods for both harvest survey samples and Canadian Canola exports. Canola harvest survey and export data were assessed to evaluate if canola harvest survey data can be [...] Read more.
Parameters, such as oil, protein, glucosinolates, chlorophyll content and fatty acid composition, were determined using reference methods for both harvest survey samples and Canadian Canola exports. Canola harvest survey and export data were assessed to evaluate if canola harvest survey data can be extrapolated to predict the quality of the Canadian canola exports. There were some differences in some measured parameters between harvest and export data, while other parameters showed little difference. Protein content and fatty acid composition showed very similar data for harvest and export averages. Canadian export data showed lower oil content when compared to the oil content of harvest survey was mainly due to a diluting effect of dockage in the export cargoes which remained constant over the years (1.7% to 1.9%). Chlorophyll was the least predictable parameter; dockage quality as well as commingling of the other grades in Canola No. 1 Canada affected the chlorophyll content of the exports. Free fatty acids (FFA) were also different for the export and harvest survey. FFA levels are affected by storage conditions; they increase during the shipping season and, therefore, are difficult to predict from their harvest survey averages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected/Extended Full Papers of 14th International Rapeseed Congress)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Detection of Leptosphaeria maculans and Leptosphaeria biglobosa Causing Blackleg Disease in Canola from Canadian Canola Seed Lots and Dockage
Plants 2016, 5(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants5010012 - 01 Mar 2016
Cited by 10
Abstract
Blackleg, caused by Leptosphaeria maculans, is a major threat to canola production in Canada. With the exception of China, L. maculans is present in areas around the world where cruciferous crops are grown. The pathogen can cause trade barriers in international [...] Read more.
Blackleg, caused by Leptosphaeria maculans, is a major threat to canola production in Canada. With the exception of China, L. maculans is present in areas around the world where cruciferous crops are grown. The pathogen can cause trade barriers in international canola seed export due to its potential risk as a seed contaminant. The most recent example is China restricting canola seeds imported from Canada and Australia in 2009. Therefore, it is important to assess the level of Blackleg infection in Canadian canola seed lots and dockage (seeds and admixture). In this study, canola seed lots and dockage samples collected from Western Canada were tested for the presence of the aggressive L. maculans and the less aggressive L. biglobosa. Results showed that both L. maculans and L. biglobosa were present in seed lots and dockage samples, with L. biglobosa being predominant in infected seeds. Admixture separated from dockage had higher levels of L. maculans and L. biglobosa infection than samples from seed lots. Admixture appears to harbour higher levels of L. maculans infection compared to seeds and is more likely to be a major source of inoculum for the spread of the disease than infected seeds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected/Extended Full Papers of 14th International Rapeseed Congress)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

Open AccessMeeting Report
Evaluating the Role of Seed Treatments in Canola/Oilseed Rape Production: Integrated Pest Management, Pollinator Health, and Biodiversity
Plants 2016, 5(3), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants5030032 - 03 Aug 2016
Cited by 4
Abstract
The use patterns and role of insecticide seed treatments, with focus on neonicotinoid insecticides, were examined for canola/oilseed rape production in Canada and the EU. Since nearly all planted canola acres in Western Canada and, historically, a majority of planted oilseed acres in [...] Read more.
The use patterns and role of insecticide seed treatments, with focus on neonicotinoid insecticides, were examined for canola/oilseed rape production in Canada and the EU. Since nearly all planted canola acres in Western Canada and, historically, a majority of planted oilseed acres in the EU, use seed treatments, it is worth examining whether broad use of insecticidal seed treatments (IST) is compatible with principles of integrated pest management (IPM). The neonicotinoid insecticide (NNI) seed treatment (NNI ST) use pattern has risen due to effective control of several early season insect pests, the most destructive being flea beetles (Phyllotreta sp.). Negative environmental impact and poor efficacy of foliar applied insecticides on flea beetles led growers to look for better alternatives. Due to their biology, predictive models have been difficult to develop for flea beetles, and, therefore, targeted application of seed treatments, as part of an IPM program, has contributed to grower profitability and overall pollinator success for canola production in Western Canada. Early evidence suggests that the recent restriction on NNI may negatively impact grower profitability and does not appear to be having positive impact on pollinator health. Further investigation on impact of NNI on individual bee vs. hive health need to be conducted. Predictive models for flea beetle emergence/feeding activity in canola/oilseed rape need to be developed, as broad acre deployment of NNI seed treatments may not be sustainable due to concerns about resistance/tolerance in flea beetles and other pest species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected/Extended Full Papers of 14th International Rapeseed Congress)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessMeeting Report
Canola/Rapeseed Protein: Future Opportunities and Directions—Workshop Proceedings of IRC 2015
Plants 2016, 5(2), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants5020017 - 13 Apr 2016
Cited by 16
Abstract
At present, canola meal is primarily streamlined into the animal feed market where it is a competitive animal feed source owing to its high protein value. Beyond animal feed lies a potential game-changer with regards to the value of canola meal, and its [...] Read more.
At present, canola meal is primarily streamlined into the animal feed market where it is a competitive animal feed source owing to its high protein value. Beyond animal feed lies a potential game-changer with regards to the value of canola meal, and its opportunity as a high quality food protein source. An economic and sustainable source of protein with high bioavailability and digestibility is essential to human health and well-being. Population pressures, ecological considerations, and production efficiency underscore the importance of highly bioavailable plant proteins, both for the developed and developing world. Despite decades of research, several technologies being developed, and products being brought to large scale production, there are still no commercially available canola protein products. The workshop entitled “Canola/Rapeseed Protein—Future Opportunities and Directions” that was held on 8 July 2015 during the 14th International Rapeseed Congress (IRC 2015) addressed the current situation and issues surrounding canola meal protein from the technological, nutritional, regulatory and genomics/breeding perspective. Discussions with participants and experts in the field helped to identify economic barriers and research gaps that need to be addressed in both the short and long term for the benefit of canola industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected/Extended Full Papers of 14th International Rapeseed Congress)
Back to TopTop