Special Issue "Quantum Dot Based Lasers and Photonic Devices"

A special issue of Photonics (ISSN 2304-6732).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2015).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Ian O’Driscoll
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Tyndall National Institute and Cork Institute of Technology Lee Maltings, Cork Ireland
Interests: quantum dots and colloidal systems; semiconductor confined systems; semiconductor lasers; semiconductor materials; mode locked lasers; ultrafast devices; optoelectronic materials; waveguides; heterodyne; spectroscopy; non-linear optical effects in semiconductors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is intended to highlight the recent progress and trends in the physics, materials science and device applications of quantum dot based lasers and photonic devices. We encourage researchers to report their new results, and research papers are welcome on the following topics—albeitnot limited to—concepts, design, fabrication and characterisation of low dimensional structures: quantum dot, wires and dashes, mode-locking and high speed dynamics in low dimensional structures, ultrafast semiconductor quantum dots/wires/dashes, optoelectronic materials, components and devices for photonic applications and advances in photonic device design.

Dr. Ian O’Driscoll
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Photonics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • quantum dots
  • semiconductor confined systems
  • semiconductor lasers
  • semiconductor materials
  • mode locked lasers
  • ultrafast devices
  • optoelectronic devices
  • photonic devices

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Quantum Dot/Liquid Crystal Nanocomposites in Photonic Devices
Photonics 2015, 2(3), 855-864; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics2030855 - 27 Jul 2015
Cited by 9
Abstract
Quantum dot/liquid crystal nano-composites are promising new materials for a variety of applications in energy harvesting, displays and photonics including the liquid crystal laser. To realize many applications, however, we need to control and stabilize nano-particle dispersion in different liquid crystal host phases [...] Read more.
Quantum dot/liquid crystal nano-composites are promising new materials for a variety of applications in energy harvesting, displays and photonics including the liquid crystal laser. To realize many applications, however, we need to control and stabilize nano-particle dispersion in different liquid crystal host phases and understand how the particles behave in an anisotropic fluid. An ideal system will allow for the controlled assembly of either well-defined nano-particle clusters or a uniform particle distribution. In this paper, we investigate mesogen-functionalized quantum dots for dispersion in cholesteric liquid crystal. These nanoparticles are known to assemble into dense stable packings in the nematic phase, and such structures, when localized in the liquid crystal defects, can potentially enhance the coupling between particles and a cholesteric cavity. Controlling the dispersion and assembly of quantum dots using mesogenic surface ligands, we demonstrate how resonant fluid photonic cavities can result from the co-assembly of luminescent nanoparticles in the presence of cholesteric liquid crystalline ordering. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Quantum Dot Based Lasers and Photonic Devices)
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Open AccessArticle
Long-Wavelength InAs/GaAs Quantum-Dot Light Emitting Sources Monolithically Grown on Si Substrate
Photonics 2015, 2(2), 646-658; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics2020646 - 18 Jun 2015
Cited by 7
Abstract
Direct integration of III–V light emitting sources on Si substrates has attracted significant interest for addressing the growing limitations for Si-based electronics and allowing the realization of complex optoelectronics circuits. However, the high density of threading dislocations introduced by large lattice mismatch and [...] Read more.
Direct integration of III–V light emitting sources on Si substrates has attracted significant interest for addressing the growing limitations for Si-based electronics and allowing the realization of complex optoelectronics circuits. However, the high density of threading dislocations introduced by large lattice mismatch and incompatible thermal expansion coefficient between III–V materials and Si substrates have fundamentally limited monolithic epitaxy of III–V devices on Si substrates. Here, by using the InAlAs/GaAs strained layer superlattices (SLSs) as dislocation filter layers (DFLs) to reduce the density of threading dislocations. We firstly demonstrate a Si-based 1.3 µm InAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) laser that lases up to 111 °C, with a low threshold current density of 200 A/cm2 and high output power over 100 mW at room temperature. We then demonstrate the operation of InAs/GaAs QD superluminescent light emitting diodes (SLDs) monolithically grown on Si substrates. The fabricated two-section SLD exhibits a 3 dB linewidth of 114 nm, centered at ~1255 nm with a corresponding output power of 2.6 mW at room temperature. Our work complements hybrid integration using wafer bonding and represents a significant milestone for direct monolithic integration of III–V light emitters on Si substrates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Quantum Dot Based Lasers and Photonic Devices)
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Open AccessArticle
Gain and Threshold Current in Type II In(As)Sb Mid-Infrared Quantum Dot Lasers
Photonics 2015, 2(2), 414-425; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics2020414 - 15 Apr 2015
Cited by 8
Abstract
In this work, we improved the performance of mid-infrared type II InSb/InAs quantum dot (QD) laser diodes by incorporating a lattice-matched p-InAsSbP cladding layer. The resulting devices exhibited emission around 3.1 µm and operated up to 120 K in pulsed mode, which is [...] Read more.
In this work, we improved the performance of mid-infrared type II InSb/InAs quantum dot (QD) laser diodes by incorporating a lattice-matched p-InAsSbP cladding layer. The resulting devices exhibited emission around 3.1 µm and operated up to 120 K in pulsed mode, which is the highest working temperature for this type of QD laser. The modal gain was estimated to be 2.9 cm−1 per QD layer. A large blue shift (~150 nm) was observed in the spontaneous emission spectrum below threshold due to charging effects. Because of the QD size distribution, only a small fraction of QDs achieve threshold at the same injection level at 4 K. Carrier leakage from the waveguide into the cladding layers was found to be the main reason for the high threshold current at higher temperatures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Quantum Dot Based Lasers and Photonic Devices)
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Open AccessArticle
Analytic Characterization of the Dynamic Regimes of Quantum-Dot Lasers
Photonics 2015, 2(2), 402-413; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics2020402 - 15 Apr 2015
Cited by 7
Abstract
We present analytic treatment of the three different dynamic regimes found in quantum-dot laser turn-on and modulation dynamics. A dynamic coupling, and thus density-dependent scattering lifetimes between dots and reservoir, are identified to be crucial for a realistic modeling. We derive a minimal [...] Read more.
We present analytic treatment of the three different dynamic regimes found in quantum-dot laser turn-on and modulation dynamics. A dynamic coupling, and thus density-dependent scattering lifetimes between dots and reservoir, are identified to be crucial for a realistic modeling. We derive a minimal model for the quantum-dot laser dynamics that can be seeded with experimentally accessible parameters, and give explicit analytic equations that are able to predict relaxation-oscillation frequency and damping rate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Quantum Dot Based Lasers and Photonic Devices)
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Open AccessArticle
Quantum Dot Laser for a Light Source of an Athermal Silicon Optical Interposer
Photonics 2015, 2(2), 355-364; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics2020355 - 03 Apr 2015
Cited by 4
Abstract
This paper reports a hybrid integrated light source fabricated on a silicon platform using a 1.3 μm wavelength quantum dot array laser. Temperature insensitive characteristics up to 120 °C were achieved by the optimum quantum dot structure and laser structure. Light output power [...] Read more.
This paper reports a hybrid integrated light source fabricated on a silicon platform using a 1.3 μm wavelength quantum dot array laser. Temperature insensitive characteristics up to 120 °C were achieved by the optimum quantum dot structure and laser structure. Light output power was obtained that was high enough to achieve an optical error-free link of a silicon optical interposer. Furthermore, we investigated a novel spot size convertor in a silicon waveguide suitable for a quantum dot laser for lower energy cost operation of the optical interposer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Quantum Dot Based Lasers and Photonic Devices)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Unlocking Spectral Versatility from Broadly−Tunable Quantum−Dot Lasers
Photonics 2015, 2(2), 719-744; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics2020719 - 22 Jun 2015
Cited by 3
Abstract
Wavelength−tunable semiconductor quantum−dot lasers have achieved impressive performance in terms of high−power, broad tunability, low threshold current, as well as broadly tunable generation of ultrashort pulses. InAs/GaAs quantum−dot−based lasers in particular have demonstrated significant versatility and promise for a range of applications in [...] Read more.
Wavelength−tunable semiconductor quantum−dot lasers have achieved impressive performance in terms of high−power, broad tunability, low threshold current, as well as broadly tunable generation of ultrashort pulses. InAs/GaAs quantum−dot−based lasers in particular have demonstrated significant versatility and promise for a range of applications in many areas such as biological imaging, optical fiber communications, spectroscopy, THz radiation generation and frequency doubling into the visible region. In this review, we cover the progress made towards the development of broadly−tunable quantum−dot edge−emitting lasers, particularly in the spectral region between 1.0–1.3 µm. This review discusses the strategies developed towards achieving lower threshold current, extending the tunability range and scaling the output power, covering achievements in both continuous wave and mode−locked InAs/GaAs quantum−dot lasers. We also highlight a number of applications which have benefitted from these advances, as well as emerging new directions for further development of broadly−tunable quantum−dot lasers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Quantum Dot Based Lasers and Photonic Devices)
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