Special Issue "Contemporary Issues in Pharmacy Education"

A special issue of Pharmacy (ISSN 2226-4787). This special issue belongs to the section "Pharmacy Education and Student / Practitioner Training".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 July 2017).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Ieva Stupans
Website
Guest Editor
School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Victoria 3000, Australia
Interests: pharmacy education; interprofessional education; teaching and learning; staff development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Educators of pharmacy students need to engage with many challenges, including preparing health graduates for practice of a future that is unpredictable, but likely to be constantly changing. Educators focus may include the development of fundamentals, such as medication management knowledge within a framework of communication skills, problem solving, life-long learning and other skills. However, there are multiple challenges, such as the advent of new technologies, universities needing to operate in a global environment, increasing costs and shrinking university budgets, demands for evidence of “accountability” regarding student outcomes and increasing student demands.

We invite you to share your approaches and successes in developing learning opportunities and assessments in pharmacy student education in the new 21st century learning environment. We hope this Special Issue will inspire other educators to share their own practices, adopt new approaches and innovate to make improvements.

Prof. Dr. Ieva Stupans
Guest Editor

 

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmacy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • assessment
  • communication skills
  • competency
  • declining
  • budget
  • global
  • learning outcomes
  • problem solving
  • student demands

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Exploration of Learning during an International Health Elective Using Photovoice Methodology
Pharmacy 2016, 4(4), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy4040039 - 29 Nov 2016
Cited by 3
Abstract
Based on surveys and structured interviews, International Health Experiences (IHEs) improve cultural sensitivity, communication, and self-confidence among health professions students. However, open-ended methods to explore student learning during an IHE are not widely utilized. We sought to explore pharmacy student-identified learning during an [...] Read more.
Based on surveys and structured interviews, International Health Experiences (IHEs) improve cultural sensitivity, communication, and self-confidence among health professions students. However, open-ended methods to explore student learning during an IHE are not widely utilized. We sought to explore pharmacy student-identified learning during an IHE in an open-ended fashion using Photovoice methodology. Pharmacy students on an IHE in Guatemala were given disposable cameras and asked to photograph images that reflected their learning. Through the application of Photovoice methodology students captured, reflected upon, and presented photos to describe the learning they experienced. Themes were drawn from the reflective and focus group data collected. During three IHEs, six students captured seventy-seven photos. Four main learning themes emerged: culture/cultural competence, professional growth, shifting of attitudes, and meaningful/emotional experiences. Pharmacy students documented learning in expected (cultural competence, professional growth) and unexpected (emotional experiences) domains during an IHE. Photovoice may be an effective methodology for the exploration of learning, allowing students to capture their own learning including and beyond what is expected by their instructors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Issues in Pharmacy Education)
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Open AccessArticle
Medication Safety: Experiential Learning for Pharmacy Students and Staff in a Hospital Setting
Pharmacy 2016, 4(4), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy4040038 - 17 Nov 2016
Abstract
Medication Safety has been an established pharmacy specialty in Australian hospitals since the early 2000s and is now one of the ten Australian hospital accreditation standards. Although advances have occurred, medication-related patient harm has not been eradicated. Victorian undergraduate pharmacy programs include some [...] Read more.
Medication Safety has been an established pharmacy specialty in Australian hospitals since the early 2000s and is now one of the ten Australian hospital accreditation standards. Although advances have occurred, medication-related patient harm has not been eradicated. Victorian undergraduate pharmacy programs include some aspects of medication safety, however clinical pharmacy experience, along with interpersonal and project management skills, are required to prepare pharmacists to be confident medication safety practitioners. This article outlines the range of medication safety-related training offered at an Australian tertiary teaching hospital, including; on-site tutorial for undergraduate students, experiential placement for pharmacy interns, orientation for pharmacy staff and resources for credentialing pharmacists for extended roles. Improvements continue to be made, such as electronic medication management systems, which increase the safe use of medications and facilitate patient care. Implementation and evaluation of these systems require medication safety expertise. Patients’ engaging in their own care is an acknowledged safety improvement strategy and is enhanced by pharmacist facilitation. Building educator skills and integrating experiential teaching with university curricula should ensure pharmacists have both the knowledge and experience early in their careers, in order to have a leading role in future medication management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Issues in Pharmacy Education)
Open AccessArticle
Using Continuing Professional Development with Portfolio in a Pharmaceutics Course
Pharmacy 2016, 4(4), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy4040036 - 07 Nov 2016
Abstract
The introduction of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) to encourage individual life-long learning as a way of maintaining professional competency in pharmacy has faced resistance. To investigate ways to address this barrier we included CPD with portfolio in a university Pharmaceutics course. Underpinning knowledge [...] Read more.
The introduction of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) to encourage individual life-long learning as a way of maintaining professional competency in pharmacy has faced resistance. To investigate ways to address this barrier we included CPD with portfolio in a university Pharmaceutics course. Underpinning knowledge for the course was delivered using a flipped classroom approach and students used the CPD model to address clinical scenarios presented in a simulated pharmacy setting. Students produced portfolio items for the different case scenarios and submitted these for assessment. This provided the opportunity for students to carry out repeated application of the CPD cycle and, in so doing, develop skills in critical thinking for self-reflection and self-evaluation. This course was designed to encourage the development of higher level learning skills for future self-directed learning. Thirty six students submitted a completed portfolio. Twenty nine students achieved a result of >70%, five students scored between 57%–69%, one student obtained a mark of 50% and one student failed. The end of course survey revealed that while students found portfolio development challenging (40%), they also reported that it was effective for self-learning (54%). Differentiating between the concepts “reflection” and “evaluation” in CPD was problematic for some students and the use of clearer, simpler language should be used to explain these processes in future CPD work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Issues in Pharmacy Education)
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Open AccessArticle
Replicable Interprofessional Competency Outcomes from High-Volume, Inter-Institutional, Interprofessional Simulation
Pharmacy 2016, 4(4), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy4040034 - 25 Oct 2016
Cited by 3
Abstract
There are significant limitations among the few prior studies that have examined the development and implementation of interprofessional education (IPE) experiences to accommodate a high volume of students from several disciplines and from different institutions. The present study addressed these gaps by seeking [...] Read more.
There are significant limitations among the few prior studies that have examined the development and implementation of interprofessional education (IPE) experiences to accommodate a high volume of students from several disciplines and from different institutions. The present study addressed these gaps by seeking to determine the extent to which a single, large, inter-institutional, and IPE simulation event improves student perceptions of the importance and relevance of IPE and simulation as a learning modality, whether there is a difference in students’ perceptions among disciplines, and whether the results are reproducible. A total of 290 medical, nursing, pharmacy, and physical therapy students participated in one of two large, inter-institutional, IPE simulation events. Measurements included student perceptions about their simulation experience using the Attitude Towards Teamwork in Training Undergoing Designed Educational Simulation (ATTITUDES) Questionnaire and open-ended questions related to teamwork and communication. Results demonstrated a statistically significant improvement across all ATTITUDES subscales, while time management, role confusion, collaboration, and mutual support emerged as significant themes. Results of the present study indicate that a single IPE simulation event can reproducibly result in significant and educationally meaningful improvements in student perceptions towards teamwork, IPE, and simulation as a learning modality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Issues in Pharmacy Education)
Open AccessArticle
Making the Transition from Student to Resident: A Method to Individualize a PGY1 Program
Pharmacy 2016, 4(4), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy4040031 - 20 Oct 2016
Abstract
A Postgraduate Year One (PGY1) resident’s concerns, limitations, and strengths may be self-identified early in the residency year but are reliant on self-awareness and insight. Program directors commonly find difficulty in identifying a resident’s specific knowledge deficits at the beginning of the program. [...] Read more.
A Postgraduate Year One (PGY1) resident’s concerns, limitations, and strengths may be self-identified early in the residency year but are reliant on self-awareness and insight. Program directors commonly find difficulty in identifying a resident’s specific knowledge deficits at the beginning of the program. A standardized resident examination can identify limitations early in training and these results can be incorporated into a tailored resident development plan. A total of sixty-two PGY1 residents completed the examination pre- and post-training over a five-year timespan. Scores increased in most core disciplines in each of the five years, indicating an overall improvement in resident knowledge throughout their PGY1 year. The approach of utilizing the scores for the resident’s individualized plan allows for customization to ensure that the resident addresses knowledge gaps where necessary. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Issues in Pharmacy Education)
Open AccessArticle
Perception of the Professional Knowledge of and Education on the Medical Technology Products among the Pharmacists in the Baltic and Nordic Countries—A Cross-Sectional Exploratory Study
Pharmacy 2016, 4(4), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy4040029 - 13 Oct 2016
Abstract
With increased development of medical technology (MT), new challenges emerge related to education and training of pharmacists and other healthcare specialists. Currently, only a few universities in the EU promote MT education and research. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate [...] Read more.
With increased development of medical technology (MT), new challenges emerge related to education and training of pharmacists and other healthcare specialists. Currently, only a few universities in the EU promote MT education and research. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the current status, views on, and need for the education on MT for the pharmacy students and practicing pharmacists in the Baltic and Nordic countries. Methods: The representatives of higher education institutions and community/hospital pharmacists from six Baltic and Nordic countries participated in a qualitative cross-sectional exploratory internet-based study from May to October 2014. Results: Approximately two-third of the respondents considered professional knowledge about MT products important for pharmacists, but half of them had never participated in any MT courses. More practicing pharmacists than representatives of academia underlined the need for increased MT education for pharmacy students in the future. Conclusions: The pharmacists in the Baltic and Nordic countries consider the professional knowledge about MT as pertinent in their education and work. The limited number and status of MT courses available today, however, is a major concern among both pharmacy students and practicing pharmacists in these countries. In the future, increasing education combining theory and practice about MT products would be one possible solution to overcome this challenge. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Issues in Pharmacy Education)
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