Special Issue "Simulation Technology in Pharmacy"

A special issue of Pharmacy (ISSN 2226-4787).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ivan Bindoff
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Pharmacy, School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart TAS 7005, Australia
Interests: simulation; serious games; eHealth, technology; virtual patients
Dr. Kenneth Lee
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, The University of Western Australia (M315), 35 Stirling Highway, 6009 Perth, Australia
Interests: simulation; mixed methods; qualitative; health information behavior; digital health; pharmacy practice; pharmacy education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With growing pressures on student placement sites, and pressure from our learners to contemporise our teaching approach, we are now seeing pharmacy professional bodies around the globe to embrace simulation technology as a key component of future training strategies. This coincides with a period of immense potential, as we see games technology, web-based technology, and mobile devices greatly expanding in terms of their accessibility and their capabilities, while reducing in cost.

To celebrate and stimulate this progress, we invite the submission of research papers that explore the use of simulation technology in pharmacy training.

Dr. Ivan Bindoff
Dr. Kenneth Lee
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmacy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Simulation
  • Games
  • Web-based
  • Serious games
  • Pharmacy training
  • Pharmacy education
  • Pharmacy continuing professional development
  • Mannequins
  • Virtual patients

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Student Acceptance of Using Augmented Reality Applications for Learning in Pharmacy: A Pilot Study
Pharmacy 2020, 8(3), 122; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy8030122 - 21 Jul 2020
Viewed by 778
Abstract
Creating engaging learning experiences that are easy to use and support the different learning requirements of university students is challenging. However, improvements in simulation technologies, such as augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR), are making such changes possible. The aim of this [...] Read more.
Creating engaging learning experiences that are easy to use and support the different learning requirements of university students is challenging. However, improvements in simulation technologies, such as augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR), are making such changes possible. The aim of this study is to use a mobile-based AR technology to develop an interactive learning module about contraceptive devices and medicines and to measure its acceptability and usability by undergraduate pharmacy students. The learning module comprising AR images of contraceptive medicines, case studies relating to their use and a series of directed questions was completed by 33 pharmacy students. Students answered a survey to collect information about the usability and acceptability of AR for learning. The results show that the majority of students reported that AR is a useful resource for learning about medicines compared to more traditional methods, such as didactic lectures and tutorials. Students indicated that the AR application was easy to use and improved their knowledge of medicines. These findings suggest that AR technology is a useful tool to create engaging and easy to use learning experiences for university students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Simulation Technology in Pharmacy)
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Article
Introducing Augmented Reality Technology to Enhance Learning in Pharmacy Education: A Pilot Study
Pharmacy 2020, 8(3), 109; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy8030109 - 30 Jun 2020
Viewed by 874
Abstract
There is increasing use of augmented reality (AR) technology, which combines the virtual and real world, in the tertiary education sector. AR enables flexibility in student learning, since this technology may be used in the face to face setting and may also be [...] Read more.
There is increasing use of augmented reality (AR) technology, which combines the virtual and real world, in the tertiary education sector. AR enables flexibility in student learning, since this technology may be used in the face to face setting and may also be accessed by students at any time outside of this setting. The purpose of this study was to develop an AR tool and investigate its effectiveness for learning about the medication naloxone using AR in a MagicBook; and determine student opinions on its acceptability and usability. Using a sequential explanatory, mixed method design, 25 undergraduate pharmacy students were recruited to participate in the study. Pre- and post-tests were used to measure changes in knowledge and a survey was used to collect information on the usability and acceptability of AR for learning. The findings of the study indicated that AR technology was able to support student learning on the chosen topic, showing 42% improvement in quiz score p < 0.0001, and that students found using AR was stimulating, interactive, engaging and easy to follow. Thus, AR technology could be an effective way to enhance student learning about medicines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Simulation Technology in Pharmacy)
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