Improving Geriatric Care through Pharmacy Practice

A special issue of Pharmacy (ISSN 2226-4787). This special issue belongs to the section "Pharmacy Practice and Practice-Based Research".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2022) | Viewed by 10017

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Social and Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, 50005 Hradec Králové, Czech Republic
2. Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, 12000 Prague, Czech Republic
Interests: geriatric care; chronic diseases; pharmacotherapy; clinical pharmacy; telemedicine; outcome research
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The global population is aging, with older people (65 and older) now being the fastest-growing segment in Europe, Asia, and the USA. Due to body function, older people generally experience more chronic conditions and use multiple medications. Prescription in older people is a complex clinical process and make them more vulnerable to medication-related problems. Pharmacists play a unique role in providing services to older people in a variety of settings. Since the 1960s, clinical pharmacy services to older people (geriatric pharmacy practice or senior care pharmacy) was well established in the USA, UK, and Australia. Their services have been shown to improve prescribing, prevent medication errors, improve patients’ medication knowledge and compliance, and reduce the risk of medication-related hospitalization.

For this Special Issue, we welcome you to contribute original research, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, short-reports, case studies, and commentaries from a variety of practitioners and academicians working on geriatric care and the development of geriatric clinical pharmacy services in different settings of care.

Dr. Akshaya Bhagavathula
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Ageing
  • older
  • geriatrics clinical pharmacy
  • practice
  • medication safety
  • pharmacy services

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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10 pages, 1159 KiB  
Article
Clinical Pharmacists’ Knowledge of and Attitudes toward Older Adults
by Tasia Karis Allen, Patrick Mayo, Sheri Koshman, Margaret Gray, Amina Babar and Cheryl Ann Sadowski
Pharmacy 2021, 9(4), 172; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy9040172 - 20 Oct 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2660
Abstract
Background: Although pharmacy literature suggests that pharmacists have a positive attitude towards older adults, there is a paucity of studies that have measured pharmacists’ knowledge or attitudes towards older people. The purpose of our study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes of [...] Read more.
Background: Although pharmacy literature suggests that pharmacists have a positive attitude towards older adults, there is a paucity of studies that have measured pharmacists’ knowledge or attitudes towards older people. The purpose of our study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes of hospital pharmacists toward older adults. Methods: An electronic survey was distributed over two months to clinical hospital pharmacists across the province of Alberta, Canada. The survey was composed of two validated tools, the Palmore Facts of Aging Quiz (PFAQ) and Kogan’s Attitude toward Old People Scale (KOPS). PFAQ is scored from 0 (poor knowledge) to 25 (high knowledge) and KOPS from 34 to 204, with higher than 119 indicating a positive attitude. Results: A total of 153 pharmacists completed the survey (response rate of 24%). The mean age was 39 (SD 10.8) years; the average years practiced was 15 (SD 11), and the majority of respondents (n = 65) reported that >50% of patients in their practice were geriatrics. The mean correct responses on the PFAQ were 18.8 (SD 2.6). KOPS had a mean score of 156.8 (SD 14), with only one pharmacist score falling below 119, indicating a negative attitude. There was a statistically significant, positive correlation between attitudes and knowledge (r = 0.38, p < 0.05), as well as the increasing age of the respondents (r = 0.18, p = 0.03). The remaining measured categories (i.e., gender, years of pharmacy practice) had no significant effect. Conclusion: Clinical hospital pharmacists in Alberta have a positive attitude toward geriatric patients, as well as a satisfactory knowledge of older adults. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Geriatric Care through Pharmacy Practice)
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Review

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7 pages, 393 KiB  
Review
The Challenge of Medication-Induced Dry Mouth in Residential Aged Care
by William Murray Thomson, Moira B. Smith, Catherine Anna Ferguson and Geraldine Moses
Pharmacy 2021, 9(4), 162; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy9040162 - 1 Oct 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3929
Abstract
With a reported prevalence between 20% and 30%, dry mouth is more common among older people than any other age group. The major risk factor for dry mouth is polypharmacy. Older people take more medications than any other age group, not only for [...] Read more.
With a reported prevalence between 20% and 30%, dry mouth is more common among older people than any other age group. The major risk factor for dry mouth is polypharmacy. Older people take more medications than any other age group, not only for symptomatic relief of various age-associated chronic diseases, but also to reduce the likelihood of the complications that may arise from those conditions. Most aged care residents take even more medications than older people who are living in their own homes. The greater the number of medications taken, the greater the associated anticholinergic burden, and the more likely it is that the individual will suffer from dry mouth. The condition not only affects the dentition and ability to wear dentures, but also the sufferers’ quality of life. Treating dry mouth is a considerable challenge for clinicians. As medication use is by far the most important risk factor, there is a need for pharmacists, doctors and dentists to work together to prevent this from occurring. Medication review and deprescribing is a key strategy, but there have not yet been any randomised control trials of its efficacy in reducing the occurrence of dry mouth. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Geriatric Care through Pharmacy Practice)
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Other

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5 pages, 185 KiB  
Case Report
Case Report of an Interprofessional Intervention to Improve Quality of Life for a Fluid-Limited Patient
by Jennifer L. Cox and Maree Donna Simpson
Pharmacy 2022, 10(1), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy10010018 - 21 Jan 2022
Viewed by 2315
Abstract
This was a case of an 81-year-old female, an amputee, who presented at hospital with a fractured neck of femur after a fall in the nursing home. The patient was being treated for several complex chronic conditions for which 30 regular medicines were [...] Read more.
This was a case of an 81-year-old female, an amputee, who presented at hospital with a fractured neck of femur after a fall in the nursing home. The patient was being treated for several complex chronic conditions for which 30 regular medicines were prescribed and 100 tablets were being taken per day. The patient was fluid limited to 1500 mL per day but the need to swallow such a high number of tablets meant that there was no fluid allowance available for any other drinks, not even a cup of tea. In the nursing home, the patient had multiple prescribers, not all from the one surgery. The pharmacist conducted a multifaceted review of the patient’s medication and lifestyle factors. Working collaboratively with the wider health care team, the intervention was able to reduce the number of medications and improve the patient’s quality of life through improving the effectiveness of other lifestyle factors. This case not only showcases pharmacist interventions but also the synergistic benefit of interprofessional working with patients with chronic and complex conditions. This is arguably more critical in rural or remote areas where there is commonly a paucity of most health practitioners, health assistants and technicians. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Geriatric Care through Pharmacy Practice)
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