Special Issue "Optical Diagnostics in Engineering"

A special issue of Optics (ISSN 2673-3269).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 February 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. David S. Nobes
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
10-281 Donadeo Innovation Centre for Engineering, 9211-116 Street NW, T6G 1H9, University of Alberta, Edmonton AB, Canada
Interests: optical diagnostics; laser/particle based measurement techniques; fluid mechanics; thermo-fluids; thermal energy systems;
Dr. Reza Sabbagh
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
10-203 Donadeo Innovation Centre for Engineering, 9211-116 Street NW, T6G 1H9, University of Alberta, Edmonton AB, Canada
Interests: optical measurements; flow modeling, centrifugal filtration and separation; electrokinetic driven flows; biomedical flows; uncertainty analysis; image processing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advances in a wide range of optical technologies has minimized the requirements for development of platforms and the cost associated for optical diagnostics. Combined with the growth in algorithms and imaging devices, multidimensional and high spatial and temporal resolution measurements are now possible. These factors have attracted researchers to implement optical diagnostics as a main tool in their research across a wide range of engineering areas. This includes not only those using a laser but any kind of diagnostics that is involves in an optical measurement.

This special issue “Optical Diagnostics in Engineering” is focused on unique and novel implementations of optical diagnostics to perform measurements in challenging engineering applications rather than just the application of the equipment to address a technical problem. We encourage you to submit high quality works that discuss the design and development of innovative optical measurement systems, experimental systems that incorporate optical diagnostics into their design, measurement procedures or diagnostics algorithms, data processing and analyzing methods that relate to engineering. The submission could discuss in lab setups and facilities but also installations and applications of optical diagnostics in remote or off-site locations. The motivation is to promote understanding related to improving optical methodologies used in optical measurements by documenting and passing on the nuances of your optical system design and experimental setup. The special issue also provides room for discussing the results of novel investigations.

If your techniques and facilities you have developed fit this area, the new open access journal Optics, is now accepting submissions for the special issue on “Optical Diagnostics in Engineering”. The Editorial Board would like to encourage you to submit your 10-12 page articles to this journal.

This Special Issue invites contributions in the following topics (but is not limited to them):

  • Design / development / optimization of an optical measurement setup
  • Design / development / optimization of an experimental system that incorporates optics
  • Application of an optical system to measure multiple parameters in a single setup
  • Innovative solutions for calibration of optical devices
  • Real time measurement challenges and data analysis
  • Tuning the optical devices and optical noise detection/removing and optimization of illumination source
  • Novel methodologies in uncertainty analysis of the optical diagnostics techniques
  • Techniques for scaling up/down of the optical test rigs and equipment (nano to macro scales)
  • Multidisciplinary methodologies to improve optical measurements, analysis and interpretation

Example techniques could include:

  • Particle image velocimetry (PIV)
  • Particle tracking velocimetry (PTV)
  • Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF)
  • Positron-emission tomography (PET)
  • Particle size distribution (PSD)
  • Digital image correlation (DIC)
  • Computed tomography (CT)

Fiber optics  

Prof. Dr. David S. Nobes
Dr. Reza Sabbagh
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Optics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Optical measurement system design
  • Experiment design for incorporation of optics
  • Setup and calibration procedures
  • Data evaluation
  • Optical procedures and processing algorithms
  • Optics in multidisciplinary applications

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of Evaporation-Induced Instabilities Using Volumetric Scanning Particle Image Velocimetry
Optics 2020, 1(1), 52-70; https://doi.org/10.3390/opt1010005 (registering DOI) - 16 Feb 2020
Abstract
The three-dimensional (3D) flow below the interface of an evaporating liquid at a low pressure is visualized and quantified using scanning particle image velocimetry. The technique presented highlights the use of a single camera and a relatively fast moving laser sheet to image [...] Read more.
The three-dimensional (3D) flow below the interface of an evaporating liquid at a low pressure is visualized and quantified using scanning particle image velocimetry. The technique presented highlights the use of a single camera and a relatively fast moving laser sheet to image the flow for an application where using more than one camera is difficult. The technique allows collection of the full three-dimensional velocity vector map over the whole liquid volume. The out-of-plane component of the velocity has been determined using two different processing approaches: (i) deriving the full vector from a 3D cross-correlation of the particle volumes and (ii) applying the continuity equation to determine out-of-plane velocities from the calculated in-plane velocity vector fields. The results obtained from both methods showed good agreement with each other. The 3D velocity field reveals the existence of a torus shaped vortex below the evaporating meniscus that was induced by the exposure of the cold liquid to the warmer solid walls. The velocity data also shows that the maximum velocity occurs below the interface, not at the interface which highlights that the observed vortex is not driven by thermocapillary forces that usually govern the flow during evaporation at smaller scales. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Diagnostics in Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
Simultaneous Stereo PIV and MPS3 Wall-Shear Stress Measurements in Turbulent Channel Flow
Optics 2020, 1(1), 40-51; https://doi.org/10.3390/opt1010004 - 06 Jan 2020
Abstract
An extended experimental method is presented in which the micro-pillar shear-stress sensor (MPS 3 ) and high-speed stereo particle-image velocimetry measurements are simultaneously performed in turbulent channel flow to conduct concurrent time-resolved measurements of the two-dimensional wall-shear stress (WSS) distribution and the velocity [...] Read more.
An extended experimental method is presented in which the micro-pillar shear-stress sensor (MPS 3 ) and high-speed stereo particle-image velocimetry measurements are simultaneously performed in turbulent channel flow to conduct concurrent time-resolved measurements of the two-dimensional wall-shear stress (WSS) distribution and the velocity field in the outer flow. The extended experimental setup, which involves a modified MPS 3 measurement setup and data evaluation compared to the standard method, is presented and used to investigate the footprint of the outer, large-scale motions (LSM) onto the near-wall small-scale motions. The measurements were performed in a fully developed, turbulent channel flow at a friction Reynolds number R e τ = 969 . A separation between large and small scales of the velocity fluctuations and the WSS fluctuations was performed by two-dimensional empirical mode decomposition. A subsequent cross-correlation analysis between the large-scale velocity fluctuations and the large-scale WSS fluctuations shows that the streamwise inclination angle between the LSM in the outer layer and the large-scale footprint imposed onto the near-wall dynamics has a mean value of Θ ¯ x = 16.53 , which is consistent with the literature relying on direct numerical simulations and hot-wire anemometry data. When also considering the spatial shift in the spanwise direction, the mean inclination angle reduces to Θ ¯ x z = 13.92 . Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Diagnostics in Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
Investigation of Five Organic Dyes in Ethanol and Butanol for Two-Color Laser-Induced Fluorescence Ratio Thermometry
Optics 2020, 1(1), 1-17; https://doi.org/10.3390/opt1010001 - 11 Dec 2019
Abstract
In this article, we compare absorption and temperature-dependent fluorescence spectra of five organic dyes for 2c-LIF (two-color laser-induced fluorescence) thermometry in ethanol and butanol. The dyes fluorescein, eosin Y, rhodamine B, rhodamine 6G, and sulforhodamine 101 individually mixed in ethanol and butanol were [...] Read more.
In this article, we compare absorption and temperature-dependent fluorescence spectra of five organic dyes for 2c-LIF (two-color laser-induced fluorescence) thermometry in ethanol and butanol. The dyes fluorescein, eosin Y, rhodamine B, rhodamine 6G, and sulforhodamine 101 individually mixed in ethanol and butanol were studied at liquid temperatures of 25–65 °C. The self-absorption spectral bands are analyzed along with intensity ratios and the respective sensitivities for one-dye and two-dye 2c-LIF thermometry are deduced. For one-dye 2c-LIF, rhodamine B showed the highest sensitivity of 2.93%/°C and 2.89%/°C in ethanol and butanol, respectively. Sulforhodamine 101 and rhodamine 6G showed the least sensitivities of 0.51%/°C and 1.24%/°C in ethanol and butanol, respectively. For two-dye 2c-LIF, rhodamine B/sulforhodamine 101 exhibited the highest temperature sensitivities of 2.39%/°C and 2.54%/°C in ethanol and butanol, respectively. The dye pair eosin Y/sulforhodamine 101 showed the least sensitivities of 0.15%/°C and 0.27%/°C in ethanol and butanol, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Diagnostics in Engineering)
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