Special Issue "Association of Nutrition, Obesity and Skin"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutritional Immunology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 January 2022) | Viewed by 6540

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Anja Saalbach
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, Leipzig University, Johannisallee 30, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
Interests: Regulation of inflammation and wound healing in obesity; role of free fatty acids in inflammation; interplay of dermal cells in inflammation and wound healing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Western diet and lifestyle contribute to the pandemic development of obesity and non-infectious degenerative diseases known as civilization diseases. Obesity is characterized by hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, and a massive increase of adipose tissue associated with enhanced secretion of adipokines, chemokines, and cytokines. It is supposed that this altered composition of the microenvironment modifies immune cell homeostasis and function, promoting chronic inflammatory diseases and disturbed tissue repair. However, the precise impact of these factors on the amplification, chronification of inflammation and delayed wound repair in obesity is still poorly understood. Adipokines have been suggested to link obesity, adipose tissue accumulation and severity of inflammation. New emerging data suggest that metabolic and nutritional components play a pivotal role in the amplification of inflammation and delayed wound repair in obesity Indeed, obesity is linked to the risk and enhanced severity of various chronic inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, arteriosclerosis psoriasis, type II diabetes, or cardiovascular diseases as well as delayed wound healing. The dramatic increase of obesity in recent decades underlines the challenge and the need to understand the association of obesity and inflammation and tissue repair in order to develop specific treatment strategies. Therefore, we invite you to submit proposals for manuscripts that bring new insights into the role of metabolic factors and nutritional components on skin inflammation and tissue repair.

Dr. Anja Saalbach
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Inflammation
  • Tissue repair
  • Obesity
  • Metabolic factors
  • Nutrition

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
Saponins of Korean Red Ginseng May Protect Human Skin from Adipokine-Associated Inflammation and Pigmentation Resulting from Particulate Matter Exposure
Nutrients 2022, 14(4), 845; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14040845 - 17 Feb 2022
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Abstract
Background: Exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) is an ever-increasing concern worldwide. Strategies to counter the detrimental effects that follow cutaneous exposure to PM, such as induction of pigmentation, inflammation, and alterations in adipokine profile, need to be investigated further. Korean red ginseng [...] Read more.
Background: Exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) is an ever-increasing concern worldwide. Strategies to counter the detrimental effects that follow cutaneous exposure to PM, such as induction of pigmentation, inflammation, and alterations in adipokine profile, need to be investigated further. Korean red ginseng (KRG) extracts and individual ingredients have been demonstrated to play an effective role in suppression of ROS, inflammation, and resultant skin aging. In addition, recent investigations revealed that Rg3 and Rf saponins work as antimelanogenic agents. In this study, we investigated whether saponins of KRG can protect against or reverse the PM-induced detrimental effects. Methods: The biological effects of PM and saponins were evaluated both in vitro and ex vivo. Cell viability and intracellular ROS levels were determined in normal human epidermal melanocytes (NHMs), human epidermal keratinocytes (NHKs), and their cocultures. Experiments to demonstrate the protective properties of saponins against consequences of exposure to PM were performed. Melanin assay, quantitative real-time PCR, and Western blotting were carried out to determine the effects on melanogenesis and the implicated molecular signaling pathways. Results: Exposure to PM resulted in decreased keratinocyte viability, which was coupled with augmented oxidative stress. These changes were attenuated by treatment with saponins. PM exposure resulted in increased expression of leptin, which was reduced by saponins. Moreover, PM exposure led to increased melanin production in a coculture model, which was mitigated by treatment with saponins. Treatment with saponins resulted in a decrease in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) levels after exposure to PM. Conclusion: Saponins of KRG can protect the skin from the harmful effects of PM exposure by reducing levels of ROS, leptin, inflammatory cytokines, and melanin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Association of Nutrition, Obesity and Skin)
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Article
Potential Benefits of the Mediterranean Diet and Physical Activity in Patients with Hidradenitis Suppurativa: A Cross-Sectional Study in a Spanish Population
Nutrients 2022, 14(3), 551; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14030551 - 27 Jan 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1096
Abstract
There is scarce scientific information regarding the potential benefits of healthy lifestyles in patients with hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). The objective of this study is to explore the potential association between the adherence to a Mediterranean diet (MD), physical activity and HS severity. A [...] Read more.
There is scarce scientific information regarding the potential benefits of healthy lifestyles in patients with hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). The objective of this study is to explore the potential association between the adherence to a Mediterranean diet (MD), physical activity and HS severity. A cross-sectional study that included patients with HS was conducted. Disease severity was evaluated by the International Hidradenitis Suppurativa Severity Score System (IHS4) and self-reported disease activity using a Numeric Rating Scale (NRS, 0–10). The adherence to a MD was assessed by the PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea (PREDIMED) questionnaire and the level of physical activity by the International Physical Activity questionnaire. A total of 221 patients with HS were included in our study. The adherence to a MD was average for a Spanish population. A higher adherence to a MD was associated with lower disease activity, lower self-reported Hurley and lower IHS4. The use of extra virgin olive oil as the main culinary lipid was the dietary habit that implied a lower degree of disease activity (p < 0.05). Regarding physical activity, both the self-reported severity and IHS4 presented an inverse association with the intensity of physical activity. The adherence to a MD and the intensity of physical activity were positively associated. The Mediterranean dietary pattern may have an impact on HS. Greater adherence to a MD is related to lower HS severity and more physical activity also correlates to lower disease severity. The MD could be an appropriate dietary pattern for patients with HS due to its anti-inflammatory properties, and combining this with increased levels of physical activity could have additional benefits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Association of Nutrition, Obesity and Skin)
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Article
Biologic Treatment in Combination with Lifestyle Intervention in Moderate to Severe Plaque Psoriasis and Concomitant Metabolic Syndrome: Rationale and Methodology of the METABOLyx Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial
Nutrients 2021, 13(9), 3015; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13093015 - 29 Aug 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1717
Abstract
Inflammatory diseases including psoriasis are associated with metabolic and cardiovascular comorbidities, including obesity and metabolic syndrome. Obesity is associated with greater psoriasis disease severity and reduced response to treatment. Therefore, targeting metabolic comorbidities could improve patients’ health status and psoriasis-specific outcomes. METABOLyx is [...] Read more.
Inflammatory diseases including psoriasis are associated with metabolic and cardiovascular comorbidities, including obesity and metabolic syndrome. Obesity is associated with greater psoriasis disease severity and reduced response to treatment. Therefore, targeting metabolic comorbidities could improve patients’ health status and psoriasis-specific outcomes. METABOLyx is a randomized controlled trial evaluating the combination of a lifestyle intervention program with secukinumab treatment in psoriasis. Here, the rationale, methodology and baseline patient characteristics of METABOLyx are presented. A total of 768 patients with concomitant moderate to severe plaque psoriasis and metabolic syndrome were randomized to secukinumab 300 mg, or secukinumab 300 mg plus a tailored lifestyle intervention program, over 24 weeks. A substudy of immunologic and metabolic biomarkers is ongoing. The primary endpoint of METABOLyx is PASI90 response at week 24. Other endpoints include patient-reported outcomes and safety. METABOLyx represents the first large scale clinical trial of an immunomodulatory biologic in combination with a standardized lifestyle intervention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Association of Nutrition, Obesity and Skin)
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Review

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Review
The Role of Nutrition in Immune-Mediated, Inflammatory Skin Disease: A Narrative Review
Nutrients 2022, 14(3), 591; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14030591 - 29 Jan 2022
Viewed by 1136
Abstract
Immune-mediated inflammatory skin diseases are characterized by a complex multifactorial etiology, in which genetic and environmental factors interact both in genesis and development of the disease. Nutrition is a complex and fascinating scenario, whose pivotal role in induction, exacerbation, or amelioration of several [...] Read more.
Immune-mediated inflammatory skin diseases are characterized by a complex multifactorial etiology, in which genetic and environmental factors interact both in genesis and development of the disease. Nutrition is a complex and fascinating scenario, whose pivotal role in induction, exacerbation, or amelioration of several human diseases has already been well documented. However, owing to the complexity of immune-mediated skin disease clinical course and breadth and variability of human nutrition, their correlation still remains an open debate in literature. It is therefore important for dermatologists to be aware about the scientific basis linking nutrition to inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, hidradenitis suppurativa, bullous diseases, vitiligo, and alopecia areata, and whether changes in diet can influence the clinical course of these diseases. The purpose of this narrative review is to address the role of nutrition in immune-mediated inflammatory skin diseases, in light of the most recent and validate knowledge on this topic. Moreover, whether specific dietary modifications could provide meaningful implementation in planning a therapeutic strategy for patients is evaluated, in accordance with regenerative medicine precepts, a healing-oriented medicine that considers the whole person, including all aspects of the lifestyle. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Association of Nutrition, Obesity and Skin)
Review
Does Probiotic Consumption Enhance Wound Healing? A Systematic Review
Nutrients 2022, 14(1), 111; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14010111 - 27 Dec 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1343
Abstract
The use of probiotics is one of the emerging lines of treatment for wound healing. This systematic review aimed to summarize currently available evidence on the effect of oral or enteral probiotic therapy on skin or oral mucosal wound healing in humans. To [...] Read more.
The use of probiotics is one of the emerging lines of treatment for wound healing. This systematic review aimed to summarize currently available evidence on the effect of oral or enteral probiotic therapy on skin or oral mucosal wound healing in humans. To verify the developments in this field and the level of available scientific evidence, we applied a broad search strategy with no restrictions on wound type, target population, probiotic strain, or intervention protocol used. This review included seven studies involving 348 individuals. Four studies reported positive outcomes for healing improvement after probiotic therapy, and none of the studies reported adverse effects or a marked increase in wound healing time. The positive or neutral results observed do not generate strong evidence regarding the effectiveness of probiotics for wound healing. However, they suggest a promising field for future clinical research where the probiotic strains used, type of wounds, and target population are controlled for. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Association of Nutrition, Obesity and Skin)
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