Special Issue "Plant-Based Foods in Cancer Prevention and Treatment"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemicals and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 February 2022) | Viewed by 7604

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Laura A. Kresty
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Section of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, and the Rogel Cancer Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
Interests: cancer prevention; esophageal cancer; Barrett’s esophagus; lung cancer; diet; chemoprevention; natural products; plant-derived; prebiotics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Epidemiological and experimental research strongly support the role of plant-based diets in cancer prevention, and more recently in the management and treatment of cancer. Plant-based foods such as fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and legumes are rich sources of fiber, anti-oxidants, vitamins, phytochemicals, and other micronutrients with documented cancer inhibitory effects. Plant bioactive compounds work through a variety of mechanisms to mitigate the “hallmarks of cancer”, including growth and proliferative signaling, genomic instability and mutations, replicative immortality, energy metabolism, cell death resistance, immune and inflammatory signaling, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Considering that only 5% to 10% of cancers are genetically linked, with the remaining 90% stemming from environmental factors, including lifestyle and dietary choices, it stands to reason that plant-based diets or dietary constituents may offer a favorable, economical, and non-toxic strategy to reduce cancer risk and enhance the efficacy of cancer treatment.

This Special Issue of Nutrients on “Plant-Based Foods in Cancer Prevention and Treatment” invites manuscripts—both reviews and original research articles—in the field of plant-based cancer inhibition, whether it be targeting cancer progression, impacting cancer management, or modulating cancer therapeutic efficacy. Both preclinical and clinical research are of interest.

Prof. Dr. Laura A. Kresty
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cancer prevention
  • Plant-based
  • Food-based
  • Functional foods
  • Chemoprevention
  • Natural products
  • Phytochemicals
  • Nutrient synergy
  • Fiber
  • Bioactive compounds
  • Therapeutic efficacy

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Article
Diallyl Trisulfide Induces Apoptosis in Breast Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Derived and Minimally Invasive Breast Cancer Cells
Nutrients 2022, 14(7), 1455; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14071455 - 31 Mar 2022
Viewed by 384
Abstract
Breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a localized form of breast cancer that can progress to invasive breast cancer. Diallyl trisulfide (DATS) is a bioactive compound from Allium vegetables reported to induce anticancer effects in several cancer models. The objective of this [...] Read more.
Breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a localized form of breast cancer that can progress to invasive breast cancer. Diallyl trisulfide (DATS) is a bioactive compound from Allium vegetables reported to induce anticancer effects in several cancer models. The objective of this study was to characterize DATS-induced apoptosis in breast DCIS and minimally invasive breast cancer cells. Breast DCIS cells SUM 102PT (ductal carcinoma in situ with areas of micro-invasion) and SUM 225CWN (chest wall recurrence of ductal carcinoma in situ) were used in this study. DATS induced a dose-dependent reduction in the colony formation ability of breast DCIS cells. DATS inhibited DCIS cell growth by inducing apoptosis as shown by a dose-dependent increase in cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation. Induction of apoptosis was more pronounced in SUM 102PT cells than in SUM 225CWN cells at similar concentrations of DATS. DATS-induced apoptosis was characterized by a dose-dependent increase in cleaved poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP). DATS treatment resulted in an increase in the cytochrome c levels and cleavage of caspases 3, 7, and 9. This study shows that DATS inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in breast DCIS derived and minimally invasive breast cancer cells, and supports further investigation of DATS as a potential chemopreventive agent for DCIS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Based Foods in Cancer Prevention and Treatment)
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Article
Associations between Christian Orthodox Church Fasting and Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund’s Cancer Prevention Recommendations
Nutrients 2022, 14(7), 1383; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14071383 - 26 Mar 2022
Viewed by 448
Abstract
Objective: Studies regarding the health effects of religious fasting have increased in the last decade. The aim of this research was to investigate the relationship between Christian Orthodox Church (COC) fasting recommendations and cancer risk, with a specific focus on fibre, fruit, vegetables, [...] Read more.
Objective: Studies regarding the health effects of religious fasting have increased in the last decade. The aim of this research was to investigate the relationship between Christian Orthodox Church (COC) fasting recommendations and cancer risk, with a specific focus on fibre, fruit, vegetables, and red and processed meat consumption. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, participants included 361 individuals from Northern Greece. One hundred and seventy-six participants followed the COC fasting regime for more than 10 years, and 185 participants did not follow any restrictive dietary patterns. Diet was assessed using a 114-item food frequency questionnaire. Results: Fasters had a more favourable dietary intake compared to non-fasters, with fasters having a higher consumption of fruit and vegetables (p = 0.009) and a significantly lower consumption of total processed meat (p < 0.001) compared to non-fasters. No significant differences were observed in the consumption of fibre and red meat consumption between the two groups. Conclusions: Following the World Cancer Research Fund Cancer Recommendations, fasters are at a potentially lowering risk of developing colorectal cancer than non-fasters due to their more favourable dietary intake. Furthermore, higher consumption of fruit and vegetables with a lower consumption of total processed meat contributes to lower the risk of metabolic syndrome. Public health strategies based on following the structured COC fasting recommendations might hopefully contribute to the prevention of metabolic syndrome and colorectal cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Based Foods in Cancer Prevention and Treatment)
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Article
Cranberry Polyphenols in Esophageal Cancer Inhibition: New Insights
Nutrients 2022, 14(5), 969; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14050969 - 24 Feb 2022
Viewed by 717
Abstract
Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is a cancer characterized by rapidly rising incidence and poor survival, resulting in the need for new prevention and treatment options. We utilized two cranberry polyphenol extracts, one proanthocyanidin enriched (C-PAC) and a combination of anthocyanins, flavonoids, and glycosides (AFG) [...] Read more.
Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is a cancer characterized by rapidly rising incidence and poor survival, resulting in the need for new prevention and treatment options. We utilized two cranberry polyphenol extracts, one proanthocyanidin enriched (C-PAC) and a combination of anthocyanins, flavonoids, and glycosides (AFG) to assess inhibitory mechanisms utilizing premalignant Barrett’s esophagus (BE) and EAC derived cell lines. We employed reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA) and Western blots to examine cancer-associated pathways and specific signaling cascades modulated by C-PAC or AFG. Viability results show that C-PAC is more potent than AFG at inducing cell death in BE and EAC cell lines. Based on the RPPA results, C-PAC significantly modulated 37 and 69 proteins in JH-EsoAd1 (JHAD1) and OE19 EAC cells, respectively. AFG treatment significantly altered 49 proteins in both JHAD1 and OE19 cells. Bioinformatic analysis of RPPA results revealed many previously unidentified pathways as modulated by cranberry polyphenols including NOTCH signaling, immune response, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Collectively, these results provide new insight regarding mechanisms by which cranberry polyphenols exert cancer inhibitory effects targeting EAC, with implications for potential use of cranberry constituents as cancer preventive agents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Based Foods in Cancer Prevention and Treatment)
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Article
Korean Red Ginseng Enhances Immunotherapeutic Effects of NK Cells via Eosinophils in Metastatic Liver Cancer Model
Nutrients 2022, 14(1), 134; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14010134 - 28 Dec 2021
Viewed by 651
Abstract
Metastasis decreases the survival rate of patients with liver cancer. Therefore, novel anti-metastatic strategies are needed. Korean Red Ginseng (KRG) is often ingested as a functional food with an immune-boosting effect. We investigated a combination of KRG and natural killer (NK) cells as [...] Read more.
Metastasis decreases the survival rate of patients with liver cancer. Therefore, novel anti-metastatic strategies are needed. Korean Red Ginseng (KRG) is often ingested as a functional food with an immune-boosting effect. We investigated a combination of KRG and natural killer (NK) cells as a novel immunotherapy approach. SK-Hep1 cells were injected into the tail vein of NRGA mice to establish an experimental metastasis model. KRG, NK cells, or a combination of KRG and NK cells were administered. Tumor growth was observed using an in vivo imaging system, and metastatic lesions were evaluated by histological analysis and immunohistochemistry. Bioluminescence intensity was lower in the KRG and NK cell combination group than in the other groups, indicating that the combination treatment suppressed the progression of metastasis. CD56 expression was used as a NK cell marker and hematological analysis was performed. The combination treatment also decreased the expression of matrix metalloproteinases and the area of metastatic lesions in liver and bone tissues, as well as increased the eosinophil count. Expression of cytokines-related eosinophils and NK cells was determined by Western blotting analysis. The expression of interleukin 33 (IL33) was induced by the combination of KRG and NK cells. High IL33 expression was associated with prolonged overall survival in the Kaplan–Meier plotter. Our results suggest that KRG enhances the immune activity of NK cells by IL-33 through eosinophils and suppresses metastatic liver cancer progression. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Based Foods in Cancer Prevention and Treatment)
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Article
Transepithelial Anti-Neuroblastoma Response to Kale among Four Vegetable Juices Using In Vitro Model Co-Culture System
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 488; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020488 - 02 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1829
Abstract
Juicing vegetables is thought to be an anticancer treatment. Support exists for a rank order of anticancer greens (kale > dandelion > lettuce > spinach) based on degrees of bioavailability of different phytochemicals, also offset by some noxious molecules (i.e., calcium-oxalate). We developed [...] Read more.
Juicing vegetables is thought to be an anticancer treatment. Support exists for a rank order of anticancer greens (kale > dandelion > lettuce > spinach) based on degrees of bioavailability of different phytochemicals, also offset by some noxious molecules (i.e., calcium-oxalate). We developed a new in vitro transepithelial anti-neuroblastoma model system. The juices were diluted as predicted once in the small intestine. They were applied to apical Caco-2Bbe1 cells atop dividing SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, and changes in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and cell growth were considered with juice spectroscopies. Studied first in monoculture, kale and dandelion were the most cytostatic juices on SH-SY5Ys, lettuce showed no effect, and high (4.2%) spinach was cytotoxic. In co-culture, high (4.2%) kale was quickest (three days) to inhibit neuroblastoma growth. By five days, dandelion and kale were equally robust. Lettuce showed small anti-proliferative effects at five days and spinach remained cytotoxic. Spinach’s cytotoxicity corresponded with major infrared bands indicative of oxalate. Kale juice uniquely induced reactive oxygen species and S-phase cell cycle arrest in SH-SY5Y. The superiority of kale and dandelion was also apparent on the epithelium, because raising TEER levels is considered healthy. Kale’s unique features corresponded with a major fluorescent peak that co-eluted with kaempferol during high performance liquid chromatography. Because the anticancer rank order was upheld, the model appears validated for screening anticancer juices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Based Foods in Cancer Prevention and Treatment)
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Article
Adherence to Prudent and Mediterranean Dietary Patterns Is Inversely Associated with Lung Cancer in Moderate But Not Heavy Male Polish Smokers: A Case-Control Study
Nutrients 2020, 12(12), 3788; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123788 - 10 Dec 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1133
Abstract
Lung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men worldwide. Studies regarding dietary patterns (DPs) and lung cancer are limited, with results remaining inconclusive, and the association of DPs with lung cancer in smokers is unclear. This study analyzed the associations between [...] Read more.
Lung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men worldwide. Studies regarding dietary patterns (DPs) and lung cancer are limited, with results remaining inconclusive, and the association of DPs with lung cancer in smokers is unclear. This study analyzed the associations between DPs, including the Polish-adapted Mediterranean diet (Polish-aMED) score, and lung cancer risk in Polish adult male smokers. This case-control study involved 439 men aged 45–80 years from northeastern Poland, including 187 newly diagnosed lung cancer cases. Dietary data was collected with a 62-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ-6). Two approaches were applied to identify dietary patterns. The Polish-aMED score was calculated (hypothesis-driven approach) and a principal component analysis (PCA) was used to identify PCA-driven DPs (data-driven approach). A logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of the lung cancer risk associated with the adherence to DPs overall as well as for moderate (2.5–11 pack-years) and heavy (>11 pack-years) smokers. Among moderate smokers, the risk of lung cancer was lower by 41% (OR: 0.59; 95% CI: 0.39–0.90; p < 0.05; adjusted model) in the higher adherence to the prudent DP when compared to the lower adherence, and by 66% (OR: 0.34; 95% CI: 0.15–0.76; p < 0.05; adjusted model) in the high adherence (7–9 points) to the Polish-aMED score when compared to the low adherence (0–3 points). No significant association between the westernized traditional DP or the sweet dairy DP and lung cancer was revealed. In conclusion, the current study suggests that pro-healthy dietary patterns, including the Mediterranean pattern, may favour lower risk of lung cancer in moderate smokers, although it was not confirmed in heavy smokers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Based Foods in Cancer Prevention and Treatment)
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Article
Gene Expression Alterations Associated with Oleuropein-Induced Antiproliferative Effects and S-Phase Cell Cycle Arrest in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells
Nutrients 2020, 12(12), 3755; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123755 - 07 Dec 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1490
Abstract
It is known that the Mediterranean diet is effective in reducing the risk of several chronic diseases, including cancer. A critical component of the Mediterranean diet is olive oil, and the relationship between olive oil consumption and the reduced risk of cancer has [...] Read more.
It is known that the Mediterranean diet is effective in reducing the risk of several chronic diseases, including cancer. A critical component of the Mediterranean diet is olive oil, and the relationship between olive oil consumption and the reduced risk of cancer has been established. Oleuropein (OL) is the most prominent polyphenol component of olive fruits and leaves. This compound has been shown to have potent properties in various types of cancers, including breast cancer. In the present study, the molecular mechanism of OL was examined in two racially different triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines—African American (AA, MDA-MB-468) and Caucasian American (CA, MDA-MB-231). The data obtained showed that OL effectively inhibits cell growth in both cell lines, concomitant with S-phase cell cycle arrest-mediated apoptosis. The results also showed that OL-treated MDA-MB-468 cells were two-fold more sensitive to OL antiproliferative effect than MDA-MB-231 cells were. At lower concentrations, OL modified the expression of many apoptosis-involved genes. OL was more effective in MDA-MB-468, compared to MDA-MB-231 cells, in terms of the number and the fold-change of the altered genes. In MDA-MB-468 cells, OL induced a noticeable transcription activation in fourteen genes, including two members of the caspase family: caspase 1 (CASP1) and caspase 14 (CASP14); two members of the TNF receptor superfamily: Fas-associated via death domain (FADD) and TNF receptor superfamily 21 (TNFRSF21); six other proapoptotic genes: growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible 45 alpha (GADD45A), cytochrome c somatic (CYCS), BCL-2 interacting protein 2 (BNIP2), BCL-2 interacting protein 3 (BNIP3), BH3 interacting domain death agonist (BID), and B-cell lymphoma/leukemia 10 (BCL10); and the CASP8 and FADD-like apoptosis regulator (CFLAR) gene. Moreover, in MDA-MB-468 cells, OL induced a significant upregulation in two antiapoptotic genes: bifunctional apoptosis regulator (BFAR) and B-Raf proto-oncogene (BRAF) and a baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) repeat-containing 3 (BIRC3). On the contrary, in MDA-MB-231 cells, OL showed mixed impacts on gene expression. OL significantly upregulated the mRNA expression of four genes: BIRC3, receptor-interacting serine/threonine kinase 2 (RIPK2), TNF receptor superfamily 10A (TNFRSF10A), and caspase 4 (CASP4). Additionally, another four genes were repressed, including caspase 6 (CASP6), pyrin domain (PYD), and caspase recruitment domain (CARD)-containing (PAYCARD), baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5), and the most downregulated TNF receptor superfamily member 11B (TNFRSF11B, 16.34-fold). In conclusion, the data obtained indicate that the two cell lines were markedly different in the anticancer effect and mechanisms of oleuropein’s ability to alter apoptosis-related gene expressions. The results obtained from this study should also guide the potential utilization of oleuropein as an adjunct therapy for TNBC to increase chemotherapy effectiveness and prevent cancer progression. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Based Foods in Cancer Prevention and Treatment)
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