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Special Issue "Natural Products for Cancer Prevention and Therapy"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2018)

Printed Edition Available!
A printed edition of this Special Issue is available here.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Anupam Bishayee

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Larkin University, 18301 N. Miami Avenue, Miami, FL 33169, USA
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Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Mukerrem Betul Yerer-Aycan

Department of Pharmacology, Erciyes University, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kayseri 38039, Turkey
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue, “Natural Products for Cancer Prevention and Therapy” is related to the 2nd International Conference on Natural Products for Cancer Prevention and Therapy, which will be held at Erciyes University, Kayseri, Turkey, 8–11 November, 2017.

Natural products represent an important source for the discovery and development of drugs for cancer prevention and therapy. Approximately, 80% of all drugs approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration during the last three decades for cancer therapy are either natural products per se or are based on, or mimicked natural products. With the introduction and refinement of new technologies, including genetic tools for production of secondary plant metabolites, combinatorial synthesis and high-throughput assays, it is likely that novel compounds from natural sources, including medicinal plants and marine organisms, would be identified and developed as cancer preventive and anticancer drugs with acceptable toxicity. In this Special Issue, contributions from eminent cancer researchers around the world will present recent advances on our knowledge on natural products in cancer prevention and therapy.

This Special Issue is open for submission from all participants of the aforementioned conference as well as any interested individual. It is expected that contributions will include original research papers, authoritative and up-to-date reviews, and commentaries on the following topics and areas:

  • Natural products for the prevention and therapy of oncologic disease.
  • Mechanism of natural agents for anticancer or cancer preventive effects.
  • In vitro, in vivo and clinical studies related to natural agents and cancer.
  • Use of natural products in conjunction with cancer chemotherapeutic drugs.
  • Challenges and innovative approaches for anticancer drug development based on natural products.
  • Novel strategy of enhancing bioavailability of natural products for cancer prevention and intervention.
  • Production of anticancer natural agents using biotechnology.
  • Pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenomic studies on anticancer phytochemicals.

Prof. Dr. Anupam  Bishayee
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Mukerrem Betul  Yerer-Aycan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Natural products

  • Medicinal plants

  • Phytochemicals

  • Nutraceuticals

  • Function food

  • Dietary agents

  • Cancer

  • Prevention

  • Treatment

  • Intervention

  • Inflammation

  • Molecular mechanisms

Published Papers (14 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle α-Chaconine and α-Solanine Inhibit RL95-2 Endometrium Cancer Cell Proliferation by Reducing Expression of Akt (Ser473) and ERα (Ser167)
Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 672; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10060672
Received: 18 April 2018 / Revised: 15 May 2018 / Accepted: 23 May 2018 / Published: 25 May 2018
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Abstract
The aim of this study is to investigate the potential inhibitory effect of α-chaconine and α-solanine on RL95-2 estrogen receptor (ER) positive human endometrial cancer cell line and to identify the effect of these glycoalkaloids on the Akt signaling and ERα. The cell
[...] Read more.
The aim of this study is to investigate the potential inhibitory effect of α-chaconine and α-solanine on RL95-2 estrogen receptor (ER) positive human endometrial cancer cell line and to identify the effect of these glycoalkaloids on the Akt signaling and ERα. The cell proliferation profiles and the cytotoxicity studies were performed by Real-Time Cell Analyzer (xCELLigence) and compared with Sulphorhodamine B (SRB) assay. The effects of α-chaconine (2.5, 5, 10 µM), α-solanine (20, 30, 50 µM), API-1 (25 µM) and MPP (20 µM) effects on Akt (Ser473) and ERα (Ser167) expressions evaluated by Western blot and qPCR method. Their IC50 values were as α-chaconine (4.72 µM) < MPP (20.01 µM) < α-solanine (26.27 µM) < API-1 (56.67 µM). 10 μM α-chaconine and 20, 30 and 50 μM α-solanine were effective in decreasing p-Akt(Ser473)/Akt ratio compared to positive control API-1. When the p-ERα/ERα ratios were evaluated, it was observed that α-chaconine (2.5, 5, 10 μM) and α-solanine (50 μM) were as effective as the specific ERα inhibitor MPP in reducing the ratio of p-ERα/ERα compared to the control group. In conclusion, it has been shown that the proliferation of α-chaconine and α-solanine in human endometrial carcinoma cells reduces the expression and activity of the Akt and ERα signaling pathway. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Frondoside A Enhances the Anti-Cancer Effects of Oxaliplatin and 5-Fluorouracil on Colon Cancer Cells
Nutrients 2018, 10(5), 560; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10050560
Received: 28 February 2018 / Revised: 25 April 2018 / Accepted: 27 April 2018 / Published: 1 May 2018
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Abstract
Over recent years, we have demonstrated that Frondoside A, a triterpenoid glycoside isolated from an Atlantic sea cucumber, has potent in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer effects against human pancreatic, breast, and lung cancer. We have also demonstrated that Frondoside A is able
[...] Read more.
Over recent years, we have demonstrated that Frondoside A, a triterpenoid glycoside isolated from an Atlantic sea cucumber, has potent in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer effects against human pancreatic, breast, and lung cancer. We have also demonstrated that Frondoside A is able to potentiate and/or synergize the anti-cancer effects of major classical cytotoxic agents, namely, gemcitabine, paclitaxel, and cisplatin, in the treatment of pancreatic, breast, and lung cancer, respectively. This study evaluates the impact of Frondoside A alone and in combination with the standard cytotoxic drugs oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in the treatment of colon cancer using three human colon cancer cell lines, namely, HT-29, HCT-116, and HCT8/S11. We demonstrate that Frondoside A, oxaliplatin, and 5-FU cause a concentration- and time-dependent reduction in the number of HT-29 colon cancer cells. A concentration of 2.5 µM of Frondoside A led to almost 100% inhibition of cell numbers at 72 h. A similar effect was only observed with a much higher concentration (100 µM) of oxaliplatin or 5-FU. The reduction in cell numbers by Frondoside A, oxaliplatin, and 5-FU was also confirmed in two other colon cancer cell lines, namely, HCT8/S11 and HCT-116, treated for 48 h. The combinations of low concentrations of these drugs for 48 h in vitro clearly demonstrated that Frondoside A enhances the inhibition of cell numbers induced by oxaliplatin or 5-FU. Similarly, such a combination also efficiently inhibited colony growth in vitro. Interestingly, we found that the inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation was significantly enhanced when Frondoside A was used in combination treatments. Moreover, we show that Frondoside A and 5-FU, when used alone, induce a concentration-dependent induction of apoptosis and that their pro-apoptotic effect is dramatically enhanced when used in combination. We further demonstrate that apoptosis induction upon the treatment of colon cancer cells was at least in part a result of the inhibition of phosphorylation of the survival kinase AKT, leading to caspase-3 activation, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inactivation, and consequently DNA damage, as suggested by the increase in the level of γH2AX. In light of these findings, we strongly suggest that Frondoside A may have a role in colon cancer therapy when used in combination with the standard cytotoxic drugs oxaliplatin and 5-FU. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Deciphering the Molecular Mechanism Underlying the Inhibitory Efficacy of Taiwanese Local Pomegranate Peels against Urinary Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma
Nutrients 2018, 10(5), 543; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10050543
Received: 3 April 2018 / Revised: 21 April 2018 / Accepted: 24 April 2018 / Published: 27 April 2018
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Abstract
Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) fruit has been demonstrated to have the inhibitory activities to various tumors. In this study, we try to uncover the molecular mechanism underlying the inhibitory capability of Taiwanese local pomegranate fruit to urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma. The results
[...] Read more.
Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) fruit has been demonstrated to have the inhibitory activities to various tumors. In this study, we try to uncover the molecular mechanism underlying the inhibitory capability of Taiwanese local pomegranate fruit to urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma. The results collected from the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay indicated that the ethanol extract of pomegranate peel exhibited better inhibitory activity to human urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma T24 and J82 cells than that of pulp. Furthermore, the ethylacetate layer of peel ethanol extract was observed to have the best inhibitory activity against urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma cells. One of the eight fractions (PEPE2 fraction) collected from the ethylacetate layer with Diaion HP-20 column chromatography demonstrated the highest inhibitory activity in urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma cells. The results of the flow cytometry and apoptotic pathway studies suggested that the inhibitory activity of PEPE2 fraction were attributed to the UBUC cell apoptosis. To confirm the above results, our results of xenograft-induced bladder tumor in nude mice showed that the oral consumption of the ethylacetate layer (2, 5, 10 and 100 mg/kg) could decrease the volume and weight of T24 tumors and caused the apoptosis in the xenografted tumors, which was observed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end-labeling assay. This study provided the likelihood that the traditionally non-edible pomegranate peel waste is re-utilized to make an affordable and promising chemopreventive product to prevent UBUC incidence or recurrence. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Resveratrol and Pterostilbene Exhibit Anticancer Properties Involving the Downregulation of HPV Oncoprotein E6 in Cervical Cancer Cells
Nutrients 2018, 10(2), 243; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10020243
Received: 3 January 2018 / Revised: 30 January 2018 / Accepted: 12 February 2018 / Published: 21 February 2018
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Abstract
Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women living in developing countries. Due to a lack of affordable effective therapy, research into alternative anticancer compounds with low toxicity such as dietary polyphenols has continued. Our aim is to determine whether
[...] Read more.
Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women living in developing countries. Due to a lack of affordable effective therapy, research into alternative anticancer compounds with low toxicity such as dietary polyphenols has continued. Our aim is to determine whether two structurally similar plant polyphenols, resveratrol and pterostilbene, exhibit anticancer and anti-HPV (Human papillomavirus) activity against cervical cancer cells. To determine anticancer activity, extensive in vitro analyses were performed. Anti-HPV activity, through measuring E6 protein levels, subsequent downstream p53 effects, and caspase-3 activation, were studied to understand a possible mechanism of action. Both polyphenols are effective agents in targeting cervical cancer cells, having low IC50 values in the µM range. They decrease clonogenic survival, reduce cell migration, arrest cells at the S-phase, and reduce the number of mitotic cells. These findings were significant, with pterostilbene often being more effective than resveratrol. Resveratrol and to a greater extent pterostilbene downregulates the HPV oncoprotein E6, induces caspase-3 activation, and upregulates p53 protein levels. Results point to a mechanism that may involve the downregulation of the HPV E6 oncoprotein, activation of apoptotic pathways, and re-establishment of functional p53 protein, with pterostilbene showing greater efficacy than resveratrol. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Migration Rate Inhibition of Breast Cancer Cells Treated by Caffeic Acid and Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester: An In Vitro Comparison Study
Nutrients 2017, 9(10), 1144; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9101144
Received: 19 September 2017 / Revised: 3 October 2017 / Accepted: 3 October 2017 / Published: 19 October 2017
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (3850 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
One of the deadliest cancers among women is a breast cancer. Research has shown that two natural substances occurring in propolis, caffeic acid (CA) and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), have significant anticancer effects. The purpose of our in vitro study was to
[...] Read more.
One of the deadliest cancers among women is a breast cancer. Research has shown that two natural substances occurring in propolis, caffeic acid (CA) and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), have significant anticancer effects. The purpose of our in vitro study was to compare cytotoxic activity and migration rate inhibition using CA and CAPE (doses of 50 and 100 µm) against triple-negative, MDA-MB-231 breast adenocarcinoma line cells, drawn from Caucasian women. Viability was measured by XTT-NR-SRB assay (Tetrazolium hydroxide-Neutral Red-Sulforhodamine B) for 24 h and 48 h periods. Cell migration for wound healing assay was taken for 0 h, 8 h, 16 h, and 24 h periods. CAPE displayed more than two times higher cytotoxicity against MDA-MB-231 cells. IC50 values for the XTT assay were as follows: CA for 24 h and 48 h were 150.94 µM and 108.42 µM, respectively, while CAPE was 68.82 µM for 24 h and 55.79 µM for 48 h. For the NR assay: CA was 135.85 µM at 24 h and 103.23 µM at 48 h, while CAPE was 64.04 µM at 24 h and 53.25 µM at 48 h. For the SRB assay: CA at 24 h was 139.80 µM and at 48 h 103.98 µM, while CAPE was 66.86 µM at 24 h and 47.73 µM at 48 h. Both agents suspended the migration rate; however, CAPE displayed better activity. Notably, for the 100 µM CAPE dose, motility of the tested breast carcinoma cells was halted. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview Cancer Prevention and Therapy with Polyphenols: Sphingolipid-Mediated Mechanisms
Nutrients 2018, 10(7), 940; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10070940
Received: 30 May 2018 / Revised: 18 July 2018 / Accepted: 19 July 2018 / Published: 21 July 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2581 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Polyphenols, chemically characterized by a polyhydroxylated phenolic structure, are well known for their widespread pharmacological properties: anti-inflammatory, antibiotic, antiseptic, antitumor, antiallergic, cardioprotective and others. Their distribution in food products is also extensive especially in plant foods such as vegetables, cereals, legumes, fruits, nuts
[...] Read more.
Polyphenols, chemically characterized by a polyhydroxylated phenolic structure, are well known for their widespread pharmacological properties: anti-inflammatory, antibiotic, antiseptic, antitumor, antiallergic, cardioprotective and others. Their distribution in food products is also extensive especially in plant foods such as vegetables, cereals, legumes, fruits, nuts and certain beverages. The latest scientific literature outlines a resilient interconnection between cancer modulation and dietary polyphenols by sphingolipid-mediated mechanisms, usually correlated with a modification of their metabolism. We aim to extensively survey this relationship to show how it could be advantageous in cancer treatment or prevention by nutrients. From this analysis it emerges that a combination of classical chemotherapy with nutrients and especially with polyphenols dietary sources may improve efficacy and decreases negative side effects of the antineoplastic drug. In this multifaceted scenario, sphingolipids play a pivotal role as bioactive molecules, emerging as the mediators of cell proliferation in cancer and modulator of chemotherapeutics. Full article
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Open AccessReview Targeting Histone Deacetylases with Natural and Synthetic Agents: An Emerging Anticancer Strategy
Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 731; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10060731
Received: 7 May 2018 / Revised: 1 June 2018 / Accepted: 4 June 2018 / Published: 6 June 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (16480 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cancer initiation and progression are the result of genetic and/or epigenetic alterations. Acetylation-mediated histone/non-histone protein modification plays an important role in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Histone modification is controlled by the balance between histone acetyltransferase and (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC)
[...] Read more.
Cancer initiation and progression are the result of genetic and/or epigenetic alterations. Acetylation-mediated histone/non-histone protein modification plays an important role in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Histone modification is controlled by the balance between histone acetyltransferase and (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes. Imbalance between the activities of these two enzymes is associated with various forms of cancer. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) regulate the activity of HDACs and are being used in cancer treatment either alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic drugs/radiotherapy. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has already approved four compounds, namely vorinostat, romidepsin, belinostat, and panobinostat, as HDACi for the treatment of cancer. Several other HDACi of natural and synthetic origin are under clinical trial for the evaluation of efficiency and side-effects. Natural compounds of plant, fungus, and actinomycetes origin, such as phenolics, polyketides, tetrapeptide, terpenoids, alkaloids, and hydoxamic acid, have been reported to show potential HDAC-inhibitory activity. Several HDACi of natural and dietary origin are butein, protocatechuic aldehyde, kaempferol (grapes, green tea, tomatoes, potatoes, and onions), resveratrol (grapes, red wine, blueberries and peanuts), sinapinic acid (wine and vinegar), diallyl disulfide (garlic), and zerumbone (ginger). HDACi exhibit their antitumor effect by the activation of cell cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis and autophagy, angiogenesis inhibition, increased reactive oxygen species generation causing oxidative stress, and mitotic cell death in cancer cells. This review summarizes the HDACs classification, their aberrant expression in cancerous tissue, structures, sources, and the anticancer mechanisms of HDACi, as well as HDACi that are either FDA-approved or under clinical trials. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Pro-Apoptotic and Anti-Cancer Properties of Diosgenin: A Comprehensive and Critical Review
Nutrients 2018, 10(5), 645; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10050645
Received: 17 March 2018 / Revised: 4 May 2018 / Accepted: 16 May 2018 / Published: 19 May 2018
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Abstract
Novel and alternative options are being adopted to combat the initiation and progression of human cancers. One of the approaches is the use of molecules isolated from traditional medicinal herbs, edible dietary plants and seeds that play a pivotal role in the prevention/treatment
[...] Read more.
Novel and alternative options are being adopted to combat the initiation and progression of human cancers. One of the approaches is the use of molecules isolated from traditional medicinal herbs, edible dietary plants and seeds that play a pivotal role in the prevention/treatment of cancer, either alone or in combination with existing chemotherapeutic agents. Compounds that modulate these oncogenic processes are potential candidates for cancer therapy and may eventually make it to clinical applications. Diosgenin is a naturally occurring steroidal sapogenin and is one of the major bioactive compounds found in dietary fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) seeds. In addition to being a lactation aid, diosgenin has been shown to be hypocholesterolemic, gastro- and hepato-protective, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, and anti-cancer. Diosgenin has a unique structural similarity to estrogen. Several preclinical studies have reported on the pro-apoptotic and anti-cancer properties of diosgenin against a variety of cancers, both in in vitro and in vivo. Diosgenin has also been reported to reverse multi-drug resistance in cancer cells and sensitize cancer cells to standard chemotherapy. Remarkably, diosgenin has also been reported to be used by pharmaceutical companies to synthesize steroidal drugs. Several novel diosgenin analogs and nano-formulations have been synthesized with improved anti-cancer efficacy and pharmacokinetic profile. In this review we discuss in detail the multifaceted anti-cancer properties of diosgenin that have found application in pharmaceutical, functional food, and cosmetic industries; and the various intracellular molecular targets modulated by diosgenin that abrogate the oncogenic process. Full article
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Open AccessReview Chinese Medicines in the Treatment of Prostate Cancer: From Formulas to Extracts and Compounds
Nutrients 2018, 10(3), 283; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10030283
Received: 18 January 2018 / Revised: 25 February 2018 / Accepted: 26 February 2018 / Published: 28 February 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (7080 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In order to fully understand the progresses and achievements in Chinese medicines for the treatment of prostate cancer, we summarize all the available reports on formulas, extracts, and compounds of Chinese medicines against prostate cancer. A number of clinical trials verified that traditional
[...] Read more.
In order to fully understand the progresses and achievements in Chinese medicines for the treatment of prostate cancer, we summarize all the available reports on formulas, extracts, and compounds of Chinese medicines against prostate cancer. A number of clinical trials verified that traditional Chinese formulas had some unique advantages in the treatment of prostate cancer. Many Chinese medicine extracts could protect against prostate cancer, and many compounds isolated from Chinese traditional medicines showed a clear anti-prostate cancer effect. However, Chinese medicines are facing many problems regarding their multicomponent nature, complicated mechanisms of action, and high doses required for therapy. Herein, we review the functions of Chinese medicines in prostate cancer and focus on their mechanisms. The review will deepen the understanding of Chinese medicines potential in the anti-prostate cancer field. In addition, we put forward a question concerning the current research on Chinese medicines: in order to better illustrate that Chinese medicines can be used in the clinical treatment of prostate cancer, should our research focus on formulas, extracts, or compounds? Full article
Open AccessReview Soy Consumption and the Risk of Prostate Cancer: An Updated Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Nutrients 2018, 10(1), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10010040
Received: 29 November 2017 / Revised: 23 December 2017 / Accepted: 28 December 2017 / Published: 4 January 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2072 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in men, accounting for 15% of all cancers in men worldwide. Asian populations consume soy foods as part of a regular diet, which may contribute to the lower PCa incidence observed in these
[...] Read more.
Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in men, accounting for 15% of all cancers in men worldwide. Asian populations consume soy foods as part of a regular diet, which may contribute to the lower PCa incidence observed in these countries. This meta-analysis provides a comprehensive updated analysis that builds on previously published meta-analyses, demonstrating that soy foods and their isoflavones (genistein and daidzein) are associated with a lower risk of prostate carcinogenesis. Thirty articles were included for analysis of the potential impacts of soy food intake, isoflavone intake, and circulating isoflavone levels, on both primary and advanced PCa. Total soy food (p < 0.001), genistein (p = 0.008), daidzein (p = 0.018), and unfermented soy food (p < 0.001) intakes were significantly associated with a reduced risk of PCa. Fermented soy food intake, total isoflavone intake, and circulating isoflavones were not associated with PCa risk. Neither soy food intake nor circulating isoflavones were associated with advanced PCa risk, although very few studies currently exist to examine potential associations. Combined, this evidence from observational studies shows a statistically significant association between soy consumption and decreased PCa risk. Further studies are required to support soy consumption as a prophylactic dietary approach to reduce PCa carcinogenesis. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Potential Anticancer Properties of Osthol: A Comprehensive Mechanistic Review
Nutrients 2018, 10(1), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10010036
Received: 21 November 2017 / Revised: 15 December 2017 / Accepted: 29 December 2017 / Published: 3 January 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (779 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cancer is caused by uncontrolled cell proliferation which has the potential to occur in different tissues and spread into surrounding and distant tissues. Despite the current advances in the field of anticancer agents, rapidly developing resistance against different chemotherapeutic drugs and significantly higher
[...] Read more.
Cancer is caused by uncontrolled cell proliferation which has the potential to occur in different tissues and spread into surrounding and distant tissues. Despite the current advances in the field of anticancer agents, rapidly developing resistance against different chemotherapeutic drugs and significantly higher off-target effects cause millions of deaths every year. Osthol is a natural coumarin isolated from Apiaceaous plants which has demonstrated several pharmacological effects, such as antineoplastic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. We have attempted to summarize up-to-date information related to pharmacological effects and molecular mechanisms of osthol as a lead compound in managing malignancies. Electronic databases, including PubMed, Cochrane library, ScienceDirect and Scopus were searched for in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies on anticancer effects of osthol. Osthol exerts remarkable anticancer properties by suppressing cancer cell growth and induction of apoptosis. Osthol’s protective and therapeutic effects have been observed in different cancers, including ovarian, cervical, colon and prostate cancers as well as chronic myeloid leukemia, lung adenocarcinoma, glioma, hepatocellular, glioblastoma, renal and invasive mammary carcinoma. A large body of evidence demonstrates that osthol regulates apoptosis, proliferation and invasion in different types of malignant cells which are mediated by multiple signal transduction cascades. In this review, we set spotlights on various pathways which are targeted by osthol in different cancers to inhibit cancer development and progression. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Batzella, Crambe and Monanchora: Highly Prolific Marine Sponge Genera Yielding Compounds with Potential Applications for Cancer and Other Therapeutic Areas
Nutrients 2018, 10(1), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10010033
Received: 1 November 2017 / Revised: 15 December 2017 / Accepted: 22 December 2017 / Published: 2 January 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (3786 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Pyrroloquinoline and guanidine-derived alkaloids present distinct groups of marine secondary metabolites with structural diversity that displayed potentialities in biological research. A considerable number of these molecular architectures had been recorded from marine sponges belonging to different marine genera, including Batzella, Crambe,
[...] Read more.
Pyrroloquinoline and guanidine-derived alkaloids present distinct groups of marine secondary metabolites with structural diversity that displayed potentialities in biological research. A considerable number of these molecular architectures had been recorded from marine sponges belonging to different marine genera, including Batzella, Crambe, Monanchora, Clathria, Ptilocaulis and New Caledonian starfishes Fromia monilis and Celerina heffernani. In this review, we aim to comprehensively cover the chemodiversity and the bioactivities landmarks centered around the chemical constituents exclusively isolated from these three marine genera including Batzella, Crambe and Monanchora over the period 1981–2017, paying a special attention to the polycyclic guanidinic compounds and their proposed biomimetic landmarks. It is concluded that these marine sponge genera represent a rich source of novel compounds with potential applications for cancer and other therapeutic areas. Full article
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Open AccessReview The Dual Antioxidant/Prooxidant Effect of Eugenol and Its Action in Cancer Development and Treatment
Nutrients 2017, 9(12), 1367; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9121367
Received: 8 November 2017 / Revised: 7 December 2017 / Accepted: 12 December 2017 / Published: 17 December 2017
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (948 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during metabolism is a normal process usually compensated for by the antioxidant defense system of an organism. However, ROS can cause oxidative damage and have been proposed to be the main cause of age-related clinical complications
[...] Read more.
The formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during metabolism is a normal process usually compensated for by the antioxidant defense system of an organism. However, ROS can cause oxidative damage and have been proposed to be the main cause of age-related clinical complications and diseases such as cancer. In recent decades, the relationship between diet and cancer has been more studied, especially with foods containing antioxidant compounds. Eugenol is a natural compound widely found in many aromatic plant species, spices and foods and is used in cosmetics and pharmaceutical products. Eugenol has a dual effect on oxidative stress, which can action as an antioxidant or prooxidant agent. In addition, it has anti-carcinogenic, cytotoxic and antitumor properties. Considering the importance of eugenol in the area of food and human health, in this review, we discuss the role of eugenol on redox status and its potential use in the treatment and prevention of cancer. Full article
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Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessConference Report Report on Second International Conference on Natural Products for Cancer Prevention and Therapy Held in Kayseri, Turkey, 8–11 November 2017
Nutrients 2018, 10(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10010008
Received: 8 December 2017 / Revised: 20 December 2017 / Accepted: 21 December 2017 / Published: 23 December 2017
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Abstract
Scientific experts from eight countries gathered[...] Full article
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