Special Issue "Food Variety and Nutrition Status"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition Methodology & Assessment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 January 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Malcolm Riley
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CSIRO Health and Biosecurity, P.O. Box 10041, Adelaide SA 5000, Australia
Interests: population health; health behaviours; health policy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Gilly Hendrie
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CSIRO Health and Biosecurity, P.O. Box 10041, Adelaide SA 5000, Australia
Interests: dietary assessment; dietary intake patterns; digital nutrition intervention

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food variety is well recognised to be important for optimal nutritional status across the life course with few exceptions—which are usually temporary, for example, exclusive consumption of breast milk for newborns. As such, dietary guidelines worldwide promote that people eat a wide variety of foods as part of a nutritious diet.

Food variety refers to the consumption of a mixture of foods from a range of food groups. The number and type of different foods consumed may vary within a food group, by meals across the day, from day to day, by season, and over the life course.

Measuring food variety is challenging, and achieving consumption of a wide variety of foods is expected to have a range of modifiable determinants. Understanding the role of food variety in promoting nutrition and health status is important to protect health. Therefore, this Special Issue of Nutrients titled “Food Variety and Nutrition Status” has been developed to compile research on this important topic. To better understand this complex area, we welcome all types of study design, in various populations using a range of methodologies.

Potential topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Importance of food variety within a healthy diet;
  • Associations between food variety and nutritional status and/or risk of chronic disease;
  • Methodologies to measure food variety;
  • Intervention studies or population initiatives to increase food variety.

Dr. Malcolm Riley
Dr. Gilly Hendrie
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Food variety
  • Diet diversity
  • Obesity
  • Health outcomes
  • Diet quality
  • Food consumption patterns
  • Nutritional status

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Participatory Methods to Identify Perceived Healthy and Sustainable Traditional Culinary Preparations across Three Generations of Adults: Results from Chile’s Metropolitan Region and Region of La Araucanía
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 489; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020489 (registering DOI) - 14 Feb 2020
Abstract
Traditional diets reflect different cultures and geographical locations, and may provide healthy diet options. In Chile, it is unknown whether traditional culinary preparations are still remembered, let alone consumed. Therefore, we adapted methods to identify traditional culinary preparations for healthy and sustainable dietary [...] Read more.
Traditional diets reflect different cultures and geographical locations, and may provide healthy diet options. In Chile, it is unknown whether traditional culinary preparations are still remembered, let alone consumed. Therefore, we adapted methods to identify traditional culinary preparations for healthy and sustainable dietary interventions. In Chile’s Metropolitan Region and the Region of La Araucanía, we collected data on the variety of traditional diets through cultural domain analyses: direct participant observation (n = 5); free listing in community workshops (n = 10); and pile sort activities within semi-structured individual interviews (n = 40). Each method was stratified by age (25–45 year, 46–65 year and ≥ 65 year) and ethnic group (first nations or not). About 600 preparations and single-ingredient foods were identified that differed both in frequency and variety by region. The foods most consumed and liked (n = 24–27) were ranked in terms of sustainability for public nutrition purposes. Methods originally designed to collect information about plants of indigenous peoples can be extended to collect data on the variety of existing traditional culinary preparations, globally. Context, both geographical and cultural, matters for understanding food variety, and its subsequent use in the design of healthy and sustainable diet interventions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Variety and Nutrition Status)
Open AccessArticle
Small-Scale Livestock Production in Nepal Is Directly Associated with Children’s Increased Intakes of Eggs and Dairy, But Not Meat
Nutrients 2020, 12(1), 252; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12010252 - 18 Jan 2020
Abstract
Animal source foods (ASF) provide nutrients essential to child growth and development yet remain infrequently consumed in rural Nepal. Agriculture and nutrition programs aim to increase ASF intake among children through small-scale animal husbandry projects. The relationship between livestock ownership and children’s consumption [...] Read more.
Animal source foods (ASF) provide nutrients essential to child growth and development yet remain infrequently consumed in rural Nepal. Agriculture and nutrition programs aim to increase ASF intake among children through small-scale animal husbandry projects. The relationship between livestock ownership and children’s consumption of ASF, however, is not well established. This study examined associations between livestock ownership and the frequency with which Nepali children consume eggs, dairy, and meat. We analyzed longitudinal 7-day food frequency data from sentinel surveillance sites of the Policy and Science of Health, Agriculture and Nutrition (PoSHAN) study. Data consisted of surveys from 485 Nepali farming households conducted twice per year for two years (a total of 1449 surveys). We used negative binomial regression analysis to examine the association between the number of cattle, poultry, and meat animals (small livestock) owned and children’s weekly dairy, egg, and meat intakes, respectively, adjusting for household expenditure on each food type, mother’s education level, caste/ethnicity, agroecological region, season, and child age and sex. We calculated predicted marginal values based on model estimates. Children consumed dairy 1.4 (95% CI 1.1–2.0), 2.3 (1.7–3.0) and 3.0 (2.1–4.2) more times per week in households owning 1, 2–4 and >4 cattle, respectively, compared to children in households without cattle. Children consumed eggs 2.8 (2.1–3.7) more times per week in households owning 1 or 2 chickens compared to children in households without chickens. Child intake of meat was higher only in households owning more than seven meat animals. Children’s intakes of dairy, eggs, and meat rose with household expenditure on these foods. Small-scale animal production may be an effective strategy for increasing children’s consumption of eggs and dairy, but not meat. Increasing household ability to access ASF via purchasing appears to be an important approach for raising children’s intakes of all three food types. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Variety and Nutrition Status)
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