Special Issue "Advance in Diet and Chronic Inflammation"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 14 May 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Lucia Malaguarnera
Website
Guest Editor
University of Catania, Dept of Biomedical and Biotechnological Sciences
Interests: Immunopathology; Molecular Medicine; Inflammation; Cellular Immunology; Chitinases; Vitamin D; Microbiota

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Diet plays an important role in the treatment and management of inflammatory conditions. Different food components have been associated to symptomatic and immune reaction and play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory conditions. Both basic and clinical research studies have shown the effect of dietary triggers of immune reaction, changes in intestinal microbiome, as well as alterations of mucosal integrity. The benefit of dietary therapies is not only in correcting nutrient deficiencies but also in improving disease activity and contributes to symptoms control. However, there are still many unknown areas in the relationship between diet and inflammation.

In this Special Issue, we will provide information on recent advances in dietary therapies for chronic inflammation, with special focus on gastrointestinal conditions.

Prof. Lucia Malaguarnera
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Diet
  • Nutrition
  • Inflammation
  • Gastrointestinal

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Malnutrition According to GLIM Criteria Is Associated with Mortality and Hospitalizations in Rehabilitation Patients with Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 369; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020369 - 26 Jan 2021
Abstract
Malnutrition has a negative impact on patients with chronic pulmonary obstructive disease (COPD). The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of malnutrition, defined by the Global Leadership Initiative for Malnutrition (GLIM), in stable COPD patients referred to pulmonary rehabilitation, and [...] Read more.
Malnutrition has a negative impact on patients with chronic pulmonary obstructive disease (COPD). The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of malnutrition, defined by the Global Leadership Initiative for Malnutrition (GLIM), in stable COPD patients referred to pulmonary rehabilitation, and to explore potential associations of malnutrition according to GLIM, and its components, with increased risk of mortality and hospitalizations in 2 years. In a post-hoc analysis of a prospective cohort of 200 rehabilitation patients with stable COPD, main outcome variables were hospital admissions, length of stay, and mortality during a 2-year follow-up. Covariates were malnutrition according to GLIM and its phenotypic criteria: unintentional weight loss, low body mass index (BMI), and low fat-free mass (FFM). Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed using logistic and proportional hazard Cox regression. Malnutrition according to GLIM showed 45% prevalence and was associated with increased mortality risk. Low age-related BMI and FFM were independently associated with mortality, which persisted after adjustment for age and lung function. Malnutrition and low BMI were also associated with increased risk of hospitalization. Malnutrition according to GLIM criteria was highly prevalent in rehabilitation patients with COPD and was associated with nearly 3 times greater mortality and hospitalization risk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Diet and Chronic Inflammation)
Open AccessArticle
Mediterranean Diet Adherence and Dietary Attitudes in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Nutrients 2020, 12(11), 3429; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113429 - 08 Nov 2020
Abstract
A specific diet regimen is a promising way of managing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), with the Mediterranean diet (MD) being a likely candidate due to its potential to modulate gut inflammation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate nutritional habits and [...] Read more.
A specific diet regimen is a promising way of managing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), with the Mediterranean diet (MD) being a likely candidate due to its potential to modulate gut inflammation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate nutritional habits and dietary attitudes of IBD patients, and to assess their adherence to the Mediterranean diet. The study enrolled 50 Crohn’s disease and 44 ulcerative colitis patients, with clinical and laboratory parameters taken. Dietary attitudes were examined, and adherence to MD was assessed using the Mediterranean Diet Service Score (MDSS). Average MDSS score was 6.0 (5.0–7.0), while only nine participants fulfilled criteria for Mediterranean diet adherence. Moreover, all of them were men (p = 0.021). Low percentage of adherence to recommended guidelines was observed for eating olive oil (25.5%), fresh fruit (14.9%), and vegetables (10.6%). Significant positive correlation was observed between total MDSS points and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels (p = 0.002). The majority of the patients (86.2%) considered that a more controlled diet could reduce their IBD symptoms, while 17% visited a nutritionist for diet advice. The majority of patients (84%) would visit educational programs regarding nutrition. In conclusion, adherence to MD was very low, while IBD patients were willing to extend their nutritional knowledge if proper educational programs were organized. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Diet and Chronic Inflammation)
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