Special Issue "Visual Function and Nutrition"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 January 2022) | Viewed by 8415

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Stuart Richer
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Captain James A Lovell Federal Health Care Center, North Chicago, IL, USA
Interests: vision , aging, epigenetics, cataract, driving-vision, diet related macular degeneration, vision performance
Dr. John Paul SanGiovanni
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
BIO5 Institute, Department of Nutritional Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
Interests: human nutrition; retinal health and disease; integrative omics; physiological imaging; model human microphysiological systems
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Modern environmental stressors, genetic predisposition and aging simultaneously impact the health of living ocular tissues. This is likely the reason that two seemingly similar young healthy college age students could have vastly different visual performance and visual processing abilities. Nutritional status remains an underutilized and actionable clinical science for optometrists and ophthalmologists to utilize for the benefit of individual patients who want to perform better. With few exceptions,  eye doctors ignore the individual and public health significance of changes in the cornea, lens, ocular media, retina and brain by failing to measure and document the subtle changes in visual function that can point to underlying tissue dysfunction and / or visual pathway dysfunction from nutrient depletion, and predispose the individual to eye disease. For example, assessment of “macula pigment optical density”, itself dependent upon dietary carotenoid intake and other physiological factors can impact global visual performance measures.Because the cornea, lens, retina and brain itself maintain intimate associations with health, vision, neural -visualpathways. Nutritional status remains an underutilized and actionable clinical science for optometrists and ophthalmologists to utilize for the benefit of individual patients who want to perform better.

In this special issue of Nutrients, we examine the role of diet and dietary components in promoting visual performance, for driving, sports and within military medicine.  Our Guest Special Topics Editors invite Original and Review Contributions in this Nutrients Special Issue devoted to the intersection of the sciences of visual function and nutrition.

Dr. Stuart Richer
Dr. John Paul SanGiovanni
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • vision 
  • performance 
  • macular pigment 
  • environment 
  • aging 
  • sports vision 
  • driving vision 
  • military vision 
  • e-gaming-vision

Published Papers (7 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

Article
Lutein and Zeaxanthin Intake during Pregnancy and Visual Function in Offspring at 11–12 Years of Age
Nutrients 2022, 14(4), 872; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14040872 - 18 Feb 2022
Viewed by 658
Abstract
(1) Background: Lutein and zeaxanthin (L&Z) are essential dietary nutrients that are a crucial component of the human macula, contributing to visual functioning. They easily cross the placental barrier, so that retinal deposition commences during foetal development. This study aims to assess associations [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Lutein and zeaxanthin (L&Z) are essential dietary nutrients that are a crucial component of the human macula, contributing to visual functioning. They easily cross the placental barrier, so that retinal deposition commences during foetal development. This study aims to assess associations between maternal L&Z intake during pregnancy and offspring visual function at 11–12 years. (2) Methods: Using the Spanish INfancia y Medio Ambiente project (INMA) Sabadell birth cohort, 431 mother–child pairs were analysed. L&Z data were obtained from food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) at week 12 and 32 of pregnancy, alongside other nutritional and sociodemographic covariates. Contrast vision (CS) and visual acuity (VA) were assessed using the automated Freiburg Acuity and Contrast Testing (FRACT) battery. Low CS and VA were defined as being below the 20th cohort centile. Associations were explored using multiple logistic regression. (3) Results: After controlling for potential confounders, L&Z intake during the 1st and 3rd trimester did not reveal any statistically significant association with either CS or VA in offspring at age 11/12 years. (4) Conclusions: No evidence of a long-term association between L&Z intake during pregnancy and visual function in offspring was found. Further larger long-term studies including blood L&Z levels are required to confirm this result. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Visual Function and Nutrition)
Communication
Night Vision and Carotenoids (NVC): A Randomized Placebo Controlled Clinical Trial on Effects of Carotenoid Supplementation on Night Vision in Older Adults
Nutrients 2021, 13(9), 3191; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13093191 - 14 Sep 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1681
Abstract
Twilight and low luminance levels are visually challenging environments for the elderly, especially when driving at night. Carotenoid rich diets are known to increase macular pigment optical density (MPOD), which in turn leads to an improvement in visual function. It is not known [...] Read more.
Twilight and low luminance levels are visually challenging environments for the elderly, especially when driving at night. Carotenoid rich diets are known to increase macular pigment optical density (MPOD), which in turn leads to an improvement in visual function. It is not known whether augmenting MPOD can lead to a decrease in vision related night driving difficulties. Additionally, it is unknown if carotenoid supplementation provides additional measurable benefits to one’s useful field of view (UFOV) along with a decreased composite crash risk score. The aim of the study was to evaluate changes in night vision function and UFOV in individuals that took carotenoid vitamin supplements for a six-month period compared to a placebo group. Methods: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, six-month trial of a 14 mg zeaxanthin/7 mg lutein-based supplement was carried out. Participants were randomized into active or placebo group (approx 2:1). Results: n = 33 participants (26 males/7 females) participated with 93% capsule intake compliance in the supplemented group (n = 24) and placebo group (n = 9). MPOD (mean/standard error SE) in the active group increased in the Right eye from 0.35 density units (du)/0.04 SE to 0.41 du/0.05 SE; p < 0.001 and in the Left eye from 0.35 du/0.05 SE to 0.37 du, p > 0.05). The supplemented group showed significant improvements in contrast sensitivity with glare in both eyes with improvements in LogMAR scores of 0.147 and 0.149, respectively (p = 0.02 and 0.01, respectively), monocularly tested glare recovery time improved 2.76 and 2.54 s, respectively, (p = 0.008 and p = 0.02), and we also noted a decreased preferred luminance required to complete visual tasks (p = 0.02 and 0.03). Improvements in UFOV scores of divided attention (p < 0.001) and improved composite crash risk score (p = 0.004) were seen in the supplemented group. The placebo group remained unchanged. Conclusions: The NVC demonstrates that augmenting MPOD in individuals with difficulty in night vision showed measurable benefits in numerous visual functions that are important for night vision driving in this small sample RCT. Additionally, we observed an improvement in UFOV divided attention test scores and decreased composite risk scores. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Visual Function and Nutrition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
The Protective Effect of Oral Application of Corni Fructus on the Disorders of the Cornea, Conjunctiva, Lacrimal Gland and Retina by Topical Particulate Matter 2.5
Nutrients 2021, 13(9), 2986; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13092986 - 27 Aug 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 922
Abstract
Particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5) may aggravate dry eye disease (DED). Corni Fructus (CF), which is fruit of Cornus officinalis Sieb. et Zucc., has been reported to have various beneficial pharmacological effects, whereas the effect of CF on the eye is still [...] Read more.
Particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5) may aggravate dry eye disease (DED). Corni Fructus (CF), which is fruit of Cornus officinalis Sieb. et Zucc., has been reported to have various beneficial pharmacological effects, whereas the effect of CF on the eye is still unknown. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effect of oral administration of water extract of CF (CFW) on the eye, hematology, and biochemistry in a DED model induced by topical exposure to PM2.5. Furthermore, the efficacy of CFW compared with cyclosporine (CsA), an anti-inflammatory agent, and lutein, the posterior eye-protective agent. Sprague-Dawley rats were topically administered 5 mg/mL PM2.5 in both eyes four times daily for 14 days. During the same period, CFW (200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg) and lutein (4.1 mg/kg) were orally administered once a day. All eyes of rats in the 0.05% cyclosporine A (CsA)-treated group were topically exposed to 20 μL of CsA, twice daily for 14 days. Oral administration of CFW attenuated the PM2.5-induced reduction of tear secretion and corneal epithelial damage. In addition, CFW protected against goblet cell loss in conjunctiva and overexpression of inflammatory factors in the lacrimal gland following topical exposure to PM2.5. Furthermore, CFW markedly prevented PM2.5-induced ganglion cell loss and recovered the thickness of inner plexiform layer. Meanwhile, CFW treatment decreased the levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in serum induced by PM2.5. Importantly, the efficacy of CFW was superior or similar to that of CsA and lutein. Taken together, oral administration of CFW may have protective effects against PM2.5-induced DED symptoms via stabilization of the tear film and suppression of inflammation. Furthermore, CFW may in part contribute to improving retinal function and lipid metabolism disorder. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Visual Function and Nutrition)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Oxidative Synergistic Effect of Vitamin D and Nutritional Complex on Retinal Pigment Epithelial and Endothelial Cell Lines against Age-Related Macular Degeneration
Nutrients 2021, 13(5), 1423; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13051423 - 23 Apr 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1448
Abstract
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial disease of the retina featured by dysfunction of retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) and loss of photoreceptor cells under oxidative stress and inflammatory conditions. Vitamin D and antioxidants have beneficial effects against retinal degenerative diseases, such as [...] Read more.
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial disease of the retina featured by dysfunction of retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) and loss of photoreceptor cells under oxidative stress and inflammatory conditions. Vitamin D and antioxidants have beneficial effects against retinal degenerative diseases, such as AMD. We investigated the impact of associating vitamin D (ND) with a nutritional antioxidant complex (Nutrof Total®; N) on oxidative stress and inflammation-like induced conditions by H2O2 and LPS, respectively, in human retinal epithelial (ARPE-19) and human retinal endothelial (HREC) cells. Application of either N or ND treatments to H2O2-induced media in ARPE-19 cells counteracted late apoptosis, attenuated oxidative DNA damage, and increased cell proliferation. Significant reduction in the expression levels of MCP1, IL-8, and IL6 cytokines was observed following application of either N or ND treatments under LPS-induced conditions in ARPE-19 cells and in MCP-1 and IL12p70 cytokine levels in HREC cells. ND and not N revealed significant downregulation of IFNγ in ARPE-19 cells, and of IL-6 and IL-18 in HREC cells. In conclusion, adding vitamin D to Nutrof Total® protects in a synergistic way against oxidative and inflammatory stress-induced conditions in retinal epithelial and endothelial cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Visual Function and Nutrition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

Review
Early Pediatric Benefit of Lutein for Maturing Eyes and Brain—An Overview
Nutrients 2021, 13(9), 3239; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13093239 - 17 Sep 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1848
Abstract
Lutein is a dietary carotenoid preferentially accumulated in the eye and the brain in early life and throughout the life span. Lutein accumulation in areas of high metabolism and oxidative stress such as the eye and the brain suggest a unique role of [...] Read more.
Lutein is a dietary carotenoid preferentially accumulated in the eye and the brain in early life and throughout the life span. Lutein accumulation in areas of high metabolism and oxidative stress such as the eye and the brain suggest a unique role of this ingredient during the development and maturation of these organs of common embryological origin. Lutein is naturally provided to the developing baby via the cord blood, breast milk and then infant diet. The presence of this carotenoid depends on fruit and vegetable intakes and its bioavailability is higher in breastmilk. This paper aims to review the anatomical development of the eye and the brain, explore the presence and selective deposition of lutein in these organs during pregnancy and infancy and, based on its functional characteristics, present the latest available research on the beneficial role of lutein in the pediatric population. The potential effects of lutein in ameliorating conditions associated with increase oxidative stress such as in prematurity will be also addressed. Since consumption of lutein rich foods falls short of government guidelines and in most region of the world infant formulas lack this bioactive, dietary recommendations for pregnant and breastfeeding women and their child can help to bridge the gap. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Visual Function and Nutrition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Reply
Reply to Green-Gomez et al. Comment on “Richer et al. Night Vision and Carotenoids (NVC): A Randomized Placebo Controlled Clinical Trial on Effects of Carotenoid Supplementation on Night Vision in Older Adults. Nutrients 2021, 13, 3191”
Nutrients 2022, 14(13), 2770; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14132770 - 05 Jul 2022
Viewed by 361
Abstract
We welcome the additional reviews and insights of Green-Gomez, Roche and Nolan [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Visual Function and Nutrition)
Comment
Comment on Richer et al. Night Vision and Carotenoids (NVC): A Randomized Placebo Controlled Clinical Trial on Effects of Carotenoid Supplementation on Night Vision in Older Adults. Nutrients 2021, 13, 3191
Nutrients 2022, 14(13), 2769; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14132769 - 05 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 350
Abstract
Richer and colleagues [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Visual Function and Nutrition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop