Special Issue "The Use of Bovine Colostrum in Medical Practice and Human Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 September 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Raymond Playford
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Visiting Research Fellow, Queen Mary University London Centre for Immunobiology, London, UK
Interests: gastrointestinal disease; growth factors; repair; nutrition; inflammatory bowel disease; herbal medicine; nutraceuticals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Colostrum is the first form of milk produced by mammals following birth, and contains high amounts of bioactive compounds such as antibodies, antimicrobials, and growth factors to protect newborns against disease and infection, and aid in gut development. There is a great deal of interest in the value of bovine colostrum, produced as a side product of the dairy industry for the maintenance of human health and in treating disease. Multiple trials are currently ongoing worldwide, with its potential applicability covering the entire age spectrum from newborns to the elderly. 

In this Special Issue, we would like to bring readers closer to the state-of-the-art in the field by gathering papers covering different aspects of the use of bovine colostrum in medical practice and human health. Articles are invited which cover matters such as the constituents of colostrum, the effect of bovine colostrum on physiology and pathophysiological processes including (but not restricted to) GI health and disease, the microbiome, immune function, use in sports medicine, and its use in different age groups, including children. Original research articles and reviews (systematic reviews and meta-analyses) are welcome.

Dr. Raymond Playford
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Food
  • Supplements
  • Physical activity
  • Sports
  • Nutraceuticals
  • Gastrointestinal disease
  • Immunology
  • Infection
  • Pediatrics
  • Microbiome

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Article
Effects of Bovine Colostrum with or without Egg on In Vitro Bacterial-Induced Intestinal Damage with Relevance for SIBO and Infectious Diarrhea
Nutrients 2021, 13(3), 1024; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13031024 - 22 Mar 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1230
Abstract
Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) occurs commonly, is difficult to treat, and frequently recurs. Bovine colostrum (BC) and chicken eggs contain immunoglobulins and other components that possess antimicrobial, immunoregulatory, and growth factor activities; however, it is not known if they have the ability [...] Read more.
Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) occurs commonly, is difficult to treat, and frequently recurs. Bovine colostrum (BC) and chicken eggs contain immunoglobulins and other components that possess antimicrobial, immunoregulatory, and growth factor activities; however, it is not known if they have the ability to reduce injury caused by the presence of bacteria associated with SIBO (Streptococcus, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus, Bacteroides, Klebsiella, Enterococcus, and Proteus) and infectious diarrhea (enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, Salmonella). We examined the effects of BC, egg, or the combination, on bacterial growth and bacteria-induced changes in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and bacterial translocation across confluent Caco-2 monolayers. BC, egg, or the combination did not affect bacterial growth. Adding bacteria to monolayers reduced TEER and (with minor variations among species) increased bacterial translocation, increased monolayer apoptosis (increased caspase-3 and Baxα, reduced Bcl2), increased intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), and reduced cell adhesion molecules zonulin1 (ZO1) and claudin-1. BC, egg, or the combination reduced these effects (all p < 0.01) and caused additional increases in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) expression. We conclude that BC ± egg strengthens mucosal integrity against a battery of bacteria relevant for SIBO and for infectious diarrhea. Oral BC ± egg may have clinical value for these conditions, especially SIBO where eradication of precipitating organisms may be difficult to achieve. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Use of Bovine Colostrum in Medical Practice and Human Health)
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Review

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Review
Diverse Immune Effects of Bovine Colostrum and Benefits in Human Health and Disease
Nutrients 2021, 13(11), 3798; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13113798 - 26 Oct 2021
Viewed by 431
Abstract
The health benefits of bovine colostrum have extensively been studied, including immune effects mediated by immunoglobulins, lactoferrin, and casein, as well as by certain growth factors. Some of these effects are not directly related to the absorption of proteins from the intestinal tract. [...] Read more.
The health benefits of bovine colostrum have extensively been studied, including immune effects mediated by immunoglobulins, lactoferrin, and casein, as well as by certain growth factors. Some of these effects are not directly related to the absorption of proteins from the intestinal tract. The ingestion of BC can modulate the function of subsets of lymphocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells and increase regulatory cytokines such as interleukin 10. In this review, we predominantly focused on evidence from human studies on benefits in health and disease. This review highlights that clear evidence of the prevention of infectious diseases in pre-term infants such as necrotizing enterocolitis, neonatal sepsis or prevention of cancer metastasis is lacking. This is clearly an area where translational science has to be strengthened, taking the considerable evidence from numerous ex vivo studies on cells and tissues and from animal interventions. The review focuses predominantly on human data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Use of Bovine Colostrum in Medical Practice and Human Health)
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Review
Potential Benefits of Bovine Colostrum in Pediatric Nutrition and Health
Nutrients 2021, 13(8), 2551; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082551 - 26 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1077
Abstract
Bovine colostrum (BC), the first milk produced from cows after parturition, is increasingly used as a nutritional supplement to promote gut function and health in other species, including humans. The high levels of whey and casein proteins, immunoglobulins (Igs), and other milk bioactives [...] Read more.
Bovine colostrum (BC), the first milk produced from cows after parturition, is increasingly used as a nutritional supplement to promote gut function and health in other species, including humans. The high levels of whey and casein proteins, immunoglobulins (Igs), and other milk bioactives in BC are adapted to meet the needs of newborn calves. However, BC supplementation may improve health outcomes across other species, especially when immune and gut functions are immature in early life. We provide a review of BC composition and its effects in infants and children in health and selected diseases (diarrhea, infection, growth-failure, preterm birth, necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), short-bowel syndrome, and mucositis). Human trials and animal studies (mainly in piglets) are reviewed to assess the scientific evidence of whether BC is a safe and effective antimicrobial and immunomodulatory nutritional supplement that reduces clinical complications related to preterm birth, infections, and gut disorders. Studies in infants and animals suggest that BC should be supplemented at an optimal age, time, and level to be both safe and effective. Exclusive BC feeding is not recommended for infants because of nutritional imbalances relative to human milk. On the other hand, adverse effects, including allergies and intolerance, appear unlikely when BC is provided as a supplement within normal nutrition guidelines for infants and children. Larger clinical trials in infant populations are needed to provide more evidence of health benefits when patients are supplemented with BC in addition to human milk or formula. Igs and other bioactive factors in BC may work in synergy, making it critical to preserve bioactivity with gentle processing and pasteurization methods. BC has the potential to become a safe and effective nutritional supplement for several pediatric subpopulations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Use of Bovine Colostrum in Medical Practice and Human Health)
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Review
Bovine Colostrum Applications in Sick and Healthy People: A Systematic Review
Nutrients 2021, 13(7), 2194; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13072194 - 25 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1048
Abstract
Colostrum is the first secretion of mammalian glands during the early period after birth giving. Its components are biologically active and have beneficial effects on new-born growth and well-being. Bovine colostrum has the highest concentration of these substances and its supplementation or application [...] Read more.
Colostrum is the first secretion of mammalian glands during the early period after birth giving. Its components are biologically active and have beneficial effects on new-born growth and well-being. Bovine colostrum has the highest concentration of these substances and its supplementation or application may provide health benefits. This systematic review was conducted to update current knowledge on bovine colostrum effects including all administration routes on healthy and sick subjects. Full texts or abstracts of twenty-eight papers as reports of systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, observational studies and case series were included after searches in Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library and Cinahl databases. The full texts of selected studies were assessed for quality using validated tools and their results were summarized in different categories. Studies were highly heterogeneous as regards to population, intervention, outcome and risk of bias. Bovine colostrum topical application was shown effective on vaginal dryness related symptoms limitation. Its use as food supplement showed interesting effects preventing upper respiratory illness in sportsmen, modulating immune system response and reducing intestinal permeability in healthy and sick subjects. Conflicting results were provided in pediatric population and little evidence is available on its use with older adults. Further studies are mandatory to better understand all factors influencing its activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Use of Bovine Colostrum in Medical Practice and Human Health)
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Review
Colostrum Therapy for Human Gastrointestinal Health and Disease
Nutrients 2021, 13(6), 1956; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13061956 - 07 Jun 2021
Viewed by 1762
Abstract
There is increasing awareness that a broad range of gastrointestinal diseases, and some systemic diseases, are characterized by failure of the mucosal barrier. Bovine colostrum is a complex biological fluid replete with growth factors, nutrients, hormones, and paracrine factors which have a range [...] Read more.
There is increasing awareness that a broad range of gastrointestinal diseases, and some systemic diseases, are characterized by failure of the mucosal barrier. Bovine colostrum is a complex biological fluid replete with growth factors, nutrients, hormones, and paracrine factors which have a range of properties likely to contribute to mucosal healing in a wide range of infective, inflammatory, and injury conditions. In this review, we describe the anatomy and physiology of the intestinal barrier and how it may fail. We survey selected diseases in which disordered barrier function contributes to disease pathogenesis or progression, and review the evidence for or against efficacy of bovine colostrum in management. These disorders include enteropathy due to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), necrotizing enterocolitis, infectious diarrhea, intestinal failure, and damage due to cancer therapy. In animal models, bovine colostrum benefits NSAID enteropathy, IBD, and intestinal failure. In human trials, there is substantial evidence of efficacy of bovine colostrum in inflammatory bowel disease and in infectious diarrhea. Given the robust scientific rationale for using bovine colostrum as a promoter of mucosal healing, further work is needed to define its role in therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Use of Bovine Colostrum in Medical Practice and Human Health)
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Review
The Use of Bovine Colostrum in Sport and Exercise
Nutrients 2021, 13(6), 1789; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13061789 - 24 May 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1578
Abstract
There has been a great deal of interest in bovine colostrum within sports nutrition over the last 25 years. Studies have investigated the effects on body composition, physical performance, recovery, gut damage and permeability, immune function, and illness risk. This narrative review considers [...] Read more.
There has been a great deal of interest in bovine colostrum within sports nutrition over the last 25 years. Studies have investigated the effects on body composition, physical performance, recovery, gut damage and permeability, immune function, and illness risk. This narrative review considers available evidence in each of these areas. Although some studies have shown protection against performance decrements caused by periods of intensified training, there is limited evidence for effects on body composition and physical performance. There is stronger evidence for benefit on gut permeability and damage markers and on immune function and illness risk, especially during periods of intensified training. The balance of available evidence for gut permeability and illness risk is positive, but further research is required to fully determine all mechanisms responsible for these effects. Early suggestions that supplementation with bovine colostrum products could increase systemic IGF-1 levels are not supported by the balance of available evidence examining a range of doses over both short- and long-term periods. Nevertheless, dose–response studies would be valuable for determining the minimum efficacious dose, although this is complicated by variability in bioactivity between products, making any dose–response findings applicable only to the specific products used in such studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Use of Bovine Colostrum in Medical Practice and Human Health)
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Review
Bovine Colostrum: Its Constituents and Uses
Nutrients 2021, 13(1), 265; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13010265 - 18 Jan 2021
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 2940
Abstract
Colostrum is the milk produced during the first few days after birth and contains high levels of immunoglobulins, antimicrobial peptides, and growth factors. Colostrum is important for supporting the growth, development, and immunologic defence of neonates. Colostrum is naturally packaged in a combination [...] Read more.
Colostrum is the milk produced during the first few days after birth and contains high levels of immunoglobulins, antimicrobial peptides, and growth factors. Colostrum is important for supporting the growth, development, and immunologic defence of neonates. Colostrum is naturally packaged in a combination that helps prevent its destruction and maintain bioactivity until it reaches more distal gut regions and enables synergistic responses between protective and reparative agents present within it. Bovine colostrum been used for hundreds of years as a traditional or complementary therapy for a wide variety of ailments and in veterinary practice. Partly due to concerns about the side effects of standard Western medicines, there is interest in the use of natural-based products of which colostrum is a prime example. Numerous preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated therapeutic benefits of bovine colostrum for a wide range of indications, including maintenance of wellbeing, treatment of medical conditions and for animal husbandry. Articles within this Special Issue of Nutrients cover the effects and use bovine colostrum and in this introductory article, we describe the main constituents, quality control and an overview of the use of bovine colostrum in health and disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Use of Bovine Colostrum in Medical Practice and Human Health)
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