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Nutrigenetics: Implications for Whole Life

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 October 2024 | Viewed by 1894

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Egas Moniz-School of Health & Science, Quinta da Granja Campus Universitário, Monte da Caparica, Portugal
2. Ecogenetics and Human Health Group, Institute of Environmental Health, TERRA Associated Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: nutrigenetics; intestinal microbiota; nutrition and non-communicable diseases like type 2 diabetes mellitus; obesity and cardiovascular diseases; nutrition in pregnancy; sports nutrition; food composition and quality assurance

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Guest Editor
1. Environmental Health Institute (ISAMB), Faculty of Medicine, University of Lisbon (FMUL), 1649-028 Lisbon, Portugal
2. Scientific Research Institute Bento da Rocha Cabral (IICBRC), 1250-047 Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: cardiovascular medicine; genetic association studies; hypertension; dislipidaemia; obesity; metabolic syndrome; salt sensitivity of blood pressure; psoriasis; cancer; biomarkers; biochemical and molecular genetics; evolutionary medicine
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nutrigenetics concern with the effect of genetic variation in nutritional status by modulating nutrient intake, uptake and metabolism. The genetic variation in the human genome is highly complex, but an individual genetic background can define metabolic response, nutritional state and susceptibility to nutrient-dependent or related diseases. The more frequent sequence variations in the human genome are single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), with more than ten million SNPs reported in public databases. Nutrigenetics studies have provided evidence of the association between SNPs and single nutrients. However, genetics can explain part of the total variation of factors associated with chronic non-communicable diseases. According to the World Health Organization, nutrition is the major modifiable determinant of chronic non-communicable diseases, and diet modification strongly affects health throughout life. The combined effect of genetic variation with modifiable factors determines an individual's lifelong phenotype and the risk of having polygenic non-communicable diseases, such as diabetes mellitus or cardiovascular disease. Nutrient needs throughout the life cycle are variable and must be adapted to an individual's lifestyle and genetics. Therefore, this Special Issue aims to increase knowledge about nutrigenetics contribution to nutrient needs, intake, absorption and metabolism, and consequently the personalization of nutritional intervention throughout different phases of the life cycle.

This Special Issue of Nutrients welcomes the submission of original research articles that relate nutrigenetics to health and disease throughout the life cycle. Narrative or systematic reviews alone, or meta-analyses will also be accepted.

Prof. Dr. Ana Valente
Prof. Dr. Manuel Bicho
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nutrigenetics
  • diet
  • life cycle
  • health
  • disease
  • nutrients
  • lifestyle
  • polymorphisms
  • genotype
  • phenotype

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 432 KiB  
Communication
Blood Iodine as a Potential Marker of the Risk of Cancer in BRCA1 Carriers
by Adam Kiljańczyk, Milena Matuszczak, Wojciech Marciniak, Róża Derkacz, Klaudia Stempa, Piotr Baszuk, Marta Bryśkiewicz, Cezary Cybulski, Tadeusz Dębniak, Jacek Gronwald, Tomasz Huzarski, Marcin R. Lener, Anna Jakubowska, Angela Cheriyan, Marek Szwiec, Małgorzata Stawicka-Niełacna, Dariusz Godlewski, Artur Prusaczyk, Andrzej Jasiewicz, Tomasz Kluz, Joanna Tomiczek-Szwiec, Ewa Kilar-Kobierzycka, Monika Siołek, Rafał Wiśniowski, Renata Posmyk, Joanna Jarkiewicz-Tretyn, Ping Sun, Rodney J. Scott, Steven A. Narod and Jan Lubińskiadd Show full author list remove Hide full author list
Nutrients 2024, 16(11), 1788; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16111788 - 6 Jun 2024
Viewed by 688
Abstract
Breast cancer and ovarian cancer pose a significant risk for BRCA1 carriers, with limited risk-reduction strategies. While improved screening helps in the early detection of breast cancer, preventive measures remain elusive. Emerging evidence suggests a potential link between iodine levels and modulation of [...] Read more.
Breast cancer and ovarian cancer pose a significant risk for BRCA1 carriers, with limited risk-reduction strategies. While improved screening helps in the early detection of breast cancer, preventive measures remain elusive. Emerging evidence suggests a potential link between iodine levels and modulation of cancer risk, but comprehensive studies are scarce. We conducted a prospective study among 989 BRCA1 carriers to assess the association between blood iodine levels and breast and ovarian cancer risk. Using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, we measured blood iodine levels and observed a negative association with breast cancer risk, with a significantly lower risk observed in quartile 4 (iodine > 38.0 µg/L) compared with quartile 1 (iodine < 30 µg/L) (HR = 0.49; 95%CI: 0.27–0.87; p = 0.01). Conversely, a suggestive increase in ovarian cancer risk was observed at higher iodine levels (HR = 1.91; 95%CI: 0.64–5.67; p = 0.25). No significant association was found between iodine levels and overall cancer risk. Our results suggest the potential of iodine to reduce breast cancer risk in BRCA1 carriers after prophylactic oophorectomy but require further validation and investigation of its effect on ovarian cancer risk and overall mortality. These findings highlight the need for personalized strategies to manage cancer risk in BRCA1 carriers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrigenetics: Implications for Whole Life)
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9 pages, 939 KiB  
Communication
Blood Lead Level as Marker of Increased Risk of Ovarian Cancer in BRCA1 Carriers
by Adam Kiljańczyk, Milena Matuszczak, Wojciech Marciniak, Róża Derkacz, Klaudia Stempa, Piotr Baszuk, Marta Bryśkiewicz, Krzysztof Lubiński, Cezary Cybulski, Tadeusz Dębniak, Jacek Gronwald, Tomasz Huzarski, Marcin R. Lener, Anna Jakubowska, Marek Szwiec, Małgorzata Stawicka-Niełacna, Dariusz Godlewski, Artur Prusaczyk, Andrzej Jasiewicz, Tomasz Kluz, Joanna Tomiczek-Szwiec, Ewa Kilar-Kobierzycka, Monika Siołek, Rafał Wiśniowski, Renata Posmyk, Joanna Jarkiewicz-Tretyn, Ping Sun, Rodney J. Scott, Steven A. Narod and Jan Lubińskiadd Show full author list remove Hide full author list
Nutrients 2024, 16(9), 1370; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16091370 - 30 Apr 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 997
Abstract
BRCA1 mutations substantially elevate the risks of breast and ovarian cancer. Various modifiers, including environmental factors, can influence cancer risk. Lead, a known carcinogen, has been associated with various cancers, but its impact on BRCA1 carriers remains unexplored. A cohort of 989 BRCA1 [...] Read more.
BRCA1 mutations substantially elevate the risks of breast and ovarian cancer. Various modifiers, including environmental factors, can influence cancer risk. Lead, a known carcinogen, has been associated with various cancers, but its impact on BRCA1 carriers remains unexplored. A cohort of 989 BRCA1 mutation carriers underwent genetic testing at the Pomeranian Medical University, Poland. Blood lead levels were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Each subject was assigned to a category based on their tertile of blood lead. Cox regression analysis was used to assess cancer risk associations. Elevated blood lead levels (>13.6 μg/L) were associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer (univariable: HR = 3.33; 95% CI: 1.23–9.00; p = 0.02; multivariable: HR = 2.10; 95% CI: 0.73–6.01; p = 0.17). No significant correlation was found with breast cancer risk. High blood lead levels are associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer in BRCA1 carriers, suggesting priority for preventive salpingo-oophorectomy. Potential risk reduction strategies include detoxification. Validation in diverse populations and exploration of detoxification methods for lowering lead levels are required. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrigenetics: Implications for Whole Life)
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