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Special Issue "Nutritional Determinants and Cardiovascular Disease"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 May 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Anastasia Z. Kalea

Division of Medicine, University College London, 21 University St, Rockefeller Building Rm 233 Institute for Cardiovascular Science, University College London London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom
Website | E-Mail
Interests: diet; nutrients; cardiovascular disease; inflammation; vascular function; inflammation; nutrigenetics; epigenetics
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Dorothy Klimis-Zacas

Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, School of Food and Agriculture, University of Maine, Orono, Maine 04469, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: vascular function; lipid metabolism; obesity-induced inflammation; angiogenesis; wound healing
Guest Editor
Prof. George Grimble

UCL, Inst Liver & Digest Hlth, Div Med, Gower St, London WC1E 6BT, England
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dietary interventions of coronary heart disease aim to halt or reverse the atherosclerosis process, the main driver for myocardial ischemia and to prevent secondary events. Even though dietary-based approaches have been linked to reduced cardiovascular risk worldwide, randomized trials on the effects of complex dietary interventions on CVD have been less impressive due to the intra-individual variability in response to treatments.

The purpose of this special issue on “Nutritional Determinants and Cardiovascular Disease” is to offer a novel insight into the effects of dietary patterns, nutrient supplementation, meal-based effects and long-term effects of sustained dietary interventions on atherogenicity. This will be presented in a context, physiologically relevant to human disease. We aim to explore further how dietary interventions affect the molecular mechanisms of disease as related to the major atherogenic risk factors, which include the tetrad of dyslipidaemia, elevated blood pressure, impaired glucose tolerance, and overweight. The insidious impact of the inflammatory component of each moiety will be discussed in the context of how the response of dietary effects are themselves modulated by the genetic and epigenetic milieu and affect cardiovascular biomarkers.

Dr. Anastasia Z. Kalea
Prof. Dr. Dorothy Klimis-Zacas
Prof. George Grimble
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular
  • Nutrigenetics
  • Personalised nutrition
  • Dietary patterns
  • Dietary fat
  • Cardiometabolic
  • Vascular complications
  • Blood pressure regulation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Plasma Trimethylamine-N-oxide following Cessation of L-carnitine Supplementation in Healthy Aged Women
Nutrients 2019, 11(6), 1322; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061322
Received: 13 May 2019 / Revised: 31 May 2019 / Accepted: 11 June 2019 / Published: 13 June 2019
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Abstract
L-carnitine supplementation elevates plasma trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), which may participate in atherosclerosis development by affecting cholesterol metabolism. The aim of the current study was to determine the effect of increased plasma TMAO on biochemical markers in the blood following cessation of L-carnitine supplementation. The [...] Read more.
L-carnitine supplementation elevates plasma trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), which may participate in atherosclerosis development by affecting cholesterol metabolism. The aim of the current study was to determine the effect of increased plasma TMAO on biochemical markers in the blood following cessation of L-carnitine supplementation. The follow-up measurements were performed on subjects who completed 24 weeks of L-carnitine or placebo supplementation protocol. Blood samples were taken after finishing the supplementation and then 4 and 12 months following the supplementation withdrawal. Four months after cessation of L-carnitine supplementation, plasma TMAO concentration reached a normal level which was stable for the following eight months. During this period, no modifications in serum lipid profile and circulating leukocyte count were noted. TMAO implications in health and disease is widely discussed. The results of this study demonstrate no adverse effects of elevated plasma TMAO, induced by L-carnitine, on the measured parameters at 4 and 12 months after withdrawal of supplementation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Determinants and Cardiovascular Disease)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Milk Powder Fortified with Potassium and Phytosterols to Decrease the Risk of Cardiovascular Events among the Adult Population in Malaysia: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis
Nutrients 2019, 11(6), 1235; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061235
Received: 17 April 2019 / Revised: 17 May 2019 / Accepted: 27 May 2019 / Published: 30 May 2019
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Abstract
This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of the consumption of a milk powder product fortified with potassium (+1050.28 mg/day) and phytosterols (+1200 mg/day) to lower systolic blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, respectively, and, therefore, the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke among [...] Read more.
This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of the consumption of a milk powder product fortified with potassium (+1050.28 mg/day) and phytosterols (+1200 mg/day) to lower systolic blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, respectively, and, therefore, the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke among the 35–75-year-old population in Malaysia. A Markov model was created against a do-nothing option, from a governmental perspective, and with a time horizon of 40 years. Different data sources, encompassing clinical studies, practice guidelines, grey literature, and statistical yearbooks, were used. Sensitivity analyses were performed to evaluate the impact of uncertainty on the base case estimates. With an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio equal to international dollars (int$) 22,518.03 per quality-adjusted life-years gained, the intervention can be classified as very cost-effective. If adopted nationwide, it would help prevent at least 13,400 MIs, 30,500 strokes, and more than 10,600 and 17,100 MI- and stroke-related deaths. The discounted cost savings generated for the health care system by those who consume the fortified milk powder would amount to int$8.1 per person, corresponding to 0.7% of the total yearly health expenditure per capita. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of the results. Together with other preventive interventions, the consumption of milk powder fortified with potassium and phytosterols represents a cost-effective strategy to attenuate the rapid increase in cardiovascular burden in Malaysia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Determinants and Cardiovascular Disease)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessCommunication
Nutritional Considerations for Peripheral Arterial Disease: A Narrative Review
Nutrients 2019, 11(6), 1219; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061219
Received: 30 April 2019 / Revised: 20 May 2019 / Accepted: 24 May 2019 / Published: 29 May 2019
PDF Full-text (244 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Those with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) require important considerations with respect to food and nutrition, owing to advanced age, poor diet behaviours and immobility associated with the disease process and co-morbid state. These considerations, coupled with the economic effectiveness of medical nutrition therapy, [...] Read more.
Those with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) require important considerations with respect to food and nutrition, owing to advanced age, poor diet behaviours and immobility associated with the disease process and co-morbid state. These considerations, coupled with the economic effectiveness of medical nutrition therapy, mandate that dietetic care plays a vital role in the management of PAD. Despite this, optimising dietetic care in PAD remains poorly understood. This narrative review considers the role of medical nutrition therapy in every stage of the PAD process, ranging from the onset and initiation of disease to well established and advanced disease. In each case, the potential benefits of traditional and novel medical nutrition therapy are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Determinants and Cardiovascular Disease)
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