Special Issue "Nutrition and Metabolism in Rheumatic Diseases"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 January 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Helena Canhao
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
EpiDoC Unit, Comprehensive Health Research Center (CHRC), Nova Medical School, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 1169-056 Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: epidemiology; predictors of disease and treatment response; interventions; innovation and new technologies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Ana Maria Rodrigues
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Medicine (Rheumatology) at NOVA Medical School, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, 1169-056 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: lifestyles and rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases; epidemiology of chronic diseases; osteoporosis and fragility fractures
Prof. Dr. Maria Joao Gregorio
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences of the University of Porto; Portugal

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Rheumatic diseases are some of the most prevalent diseases. With the aging of the population, their prevalence and burden are expected to increase. Modifiable factors like nutrition might play a role in the course and prognosis of these diseases. Increasing amounts of evidence are showing that the microbiome also plays a relevant role.

Most of the patients with rheumatic diseases have more than one disease. Multimorbidity, namely the association of rheumatic diseases with obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and other metabolism dysfunctions, as well as depression and unhealthy life styles, call for improved patient literacy, patient empowerment, and integrated care.

The aim of this Special Issue is to bring together researchers, academics, clinicians, nutritionists, other health professionals, and experts in the fields of rheumatic diseases, nutrition, and metabolism to increase our knowledge and evidence of nutrition and metabolism in rheumatic diseases.

Prof. Helena Canhao
Prof. Ana Maria Rodrigues
Prof. Maria Joao Gregorio
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • rheumatic diseases
  • nutrition
  • metabolism
  • obesity
  • cardiovascular diseases
  • microbiome

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Evaluation of Nutritional Status and Methods to Identify Nutritional Risk in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Spondyloarthritis
Nutrients 2020, 12(11), 3571; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113571 - 21 Nov 2020
Viewed by 1235
Abstract
Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondyloarthritis (SpA) experience several nutritional challenges and are prone to develop malnutrition. This observational study aimed to perform a comprehensive nutritional assessment of outpatients diagnosed with RA and SpA, as well as to evaluate methods to identify [...] Read more.
Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondyloarthritis (SpA) experience several nutritional challenges and are prone to develop malnutrition. This observational study aimed to perform a comprehensive nutritional assessment of outpatients diagnosed with RA and SpA, as well as to evaluate methods to identify nutritional risk. Nutritional status was investigated by anthropometric measures, body composition (DXA, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), and handgrip strength (HGS). Nutritional risk was classified by Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS2002) and malnutrition was defined by the Global Leadership Initiative on Malnutrition (GLIM) criteria and fat-free mass index (FFMI; kg/m2, <16.7 (M), <14.6 (F)). Out of 71 included patients, 46 (66%) were abdominally obese, 28 (39%) were obese in terms of body mass index (BMI), and 33 (52%) were obese in terms of the fat mass index (FMI; kg/m2, ≥8.3 (M), ≥11.8 (F)). Malnutrition was identified according to FFMI in 12 (19%) patients, according to GLIM criteria in 5 (8%) patients, and on the basis of BMI (<18.5 kg/m2) in 1 (1%) patient. None were identified by NRS2002 to be at nutritional risk. Our study revealed high prevalence of abdominal obesity and low FFMI. Waist circumference was a good indicator of FMI. BMI, NRS2002, and HGS did not capture patients with malnutrition identified by DXA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Metabolism in Rheumatic Diseases)

Review

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Review
Cross-Talk between Diet-Associated Dysbiosis and Hand Osteoarthritis
Nutrients 2020, 12(11), 3469; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113469 - 12 Nov 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1287
Abstract
Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease which leads to pain and disability. Recent studies focus on the role of obesity and metabolic syndrome in inducing or worsening joint damage in hand OA patients, suggesting that chronic low-grade systemic inflammation may represent [...] Read more.
Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease which leads to pain and disability. Recent studies focus on the role of obesity and metabolic syndrome in inducing or worsening joint damage in hand OA patients, suggesting that chronic low-grade systemic inflammation may represent a possible linking factor. The gut microbiome has a crucial metabolic role which is fundamental for immune system development, among other important functions. Intestinal microbiota dysbiosis may favour metabolic syndrome and low-grade inflammation—two important components of hand OA onset and evolution. The aim of this narrative is to review the recent literature concerning the possible contribution of dysbiosis to hand OA onset and progression, and to discuss the importance of gut dysbiosis on general health and disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Metabolism in Rheumatic Diseases)
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