Animal-Originated Food Intake and Human Health

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutritional Epidemiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 August 2024 | Viewed by 4083

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Immunology and Food Microbiology, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Tuwima 10, 10-748 Olsztyn, Poland
Interests: intestinal epithelium physiology; gut microbiota; in vitro models of intestinal epithelium

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Guest Editor
Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, 10-719 Olsztyn, Poland
Interests: milk of different mammals; fermentation; bioactive compounds of milk; allergenicity of milk; immunoreactivity of food; food safety
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Diet is the main factor influencing the development of the body and maintaining its good condition. A properly balanced diet provides the body with all the compounds necessary for the proper functioning of the organism and its individual systems, such as the immune, digestive, or cardiovascular systems. The growing interest in diets targeted at narrow groups of consumers/patients or in restrictive/elimination diets makes it increasingly important to demonstrate the role of individual ingredients consumed in optimum, deficiency, or excess. This Special Issue will focus on both the positive and negative role of animal-derived diet compounds in maintaining health and preventing the development of disease at all stages of human life.

We welcome submissions including, but not limited to, the following areas:

-Human studies (epidemiological and interventional);

-Mechanistic studies aiming at elucidating the biological basis of observed phenomena in in vitro and in vivo animal models.

Dr. Lidia Markiewicz
Dr. Anna Ogrodowczyk
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • diet
  • animal protein
  • animal fat
  • non-communicable diseases
  • gut microbiome
  • malnutrition
  • novel foods

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

22 pages, 2060 KiB  
Article
The Nutri-Score Scale—A Tool for Assessing the Nutritional Quality of Processed Meat Products Available on the Polish Market
by Katarzyna Czech-Załubska, Anna Didkowska, Daniel Klich, Agnieszka Jackowska-Tracz, Joanna Zarzyńska and Krzysztof Anusz
Nutrients 2024, 16(6), 827; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16060827 - 14 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1093
Abstract
Although meat and meat products are important sources of protein in the human diet, consumption appears to be a predisposing factor in the onset of several civilisation diseases, particularly red meat and its products. One way to reduce diet-related diseases is to guide [...] Read more.
Although meat and meat products are important sources of protein in the human diet, consumption appears to be a predisposing factor in the onset of several civilisation diseases, particularly red meat and its products. One way to reduce diet-related diseases is to guide consumers towards consciously purchasing healthier foods by including a nutrition declaration on product labels, such as by using a “front-of-pack” (FOP) labelling system. This study aimed to determine the Nutri-Score classes for processed meat products, distinguish products that are potentially better for consumers, and determine whether the refined algorithm significantly contributed to a change in product classification. An analysis of the labels of 1700 products available on the Polish market indicated that most processed meat products qualified as class D and E. Comparing the refined Nutri-Score calculation algorithm with the original algorithm resulted in a slight change in product allocation. Poultry products were ranked more favourably than red meat products. The most significant change in product allocation (by 35.2%) was achieved by reducing salt content by 30% and fat content by 10%. Among the processed meat products, some are more highly ranked and are hence considered better from a nutritional perspective than others in that group. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal-Originated Food Intake and Human Health)
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11 pages, 537 KiB  
Article
Consumption Patterns and the Nutritional Contribution of Total, Processed, Fresh, and Fresh-Lean Pork to the U.S. Diet
by Lindsay Y. Datlow, Mark Leventhal, Jay King and Taylor C. Wallace
Nutrients 2023, 15(11), 2595; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15112595 - 1 Jun 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2543
Abstract
Pork has the potential to provide several macro and micronutrients to the diet, as it is a commonly consumed protein in the United States and across many cultures worldwide. There is an absence of clinical and observational studies that isolate the nutritional contribution [...] Read more.
Pork has the potential to provide several macro and micronutrients to the diet, as it is a commonly consumed protein in the United States and across many cultures worldwide. There is an absence of clinical and observational studies that isolate the nutritional contribution of various types of pork intake from that of other red and/or processed meats. The objective of this study was to assess consumption patterns and the nutritional contribution of total, processed, fresh, and fresh-lean pork to the diets of participants aged 2+ years enrolled in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007–2018 data cycles. The recent National Cancer Institute method was used to disaggregate fresh and processed pork intake from the USDA Food Patterns Equivalents Database. The mean intake of total pork among consumers was estimated to be 79.5 ± 0.82, 54.2 ± 0.69, 54.6 ± 0.93, and 45.9 ± 0.73, g/d for men, women, boys, and girls, respectively. Total pork consumption subtly increased intakes of total energy and several macro and micronutrients, decreased diet quality (HEI-2015) scores (adults only), and consumption of other “healthful” food groups. Only subtle but clinically insignificant effects of pork intake on biomarkers of nutritional status were shown. These trends were largely driven by processed pork consumption and the co-consumption of foods such as condiments. Increasing the availability and education around fresh-lean cuts may help to increase intake of protein and other key nutrients across certain subpopulations, without adversely affecting diet quality and biomarkers of health status. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal-Originated Food Intake and Human Health)
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