Special Issue "Diet in the Management of Weight Loss"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Vicente Martinez Vizcaino
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Guest Editor
Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Health and Social Research Center, Cuenca, Spain
Interests: Obesity; Cardiovascular disease; meta-analysis; physical activity
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Celia Álvarez Bueno
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Guest Editor
Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Health and Social Research Center, Cuenca, Spain
Interests: Fitness; Cognition; meta-analysis; physical activity
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Iván Cavero Redondo
Website
Guest Editor
Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Health and Social Research Center, Cuenca, Spain
Interests: Biomarkers; cardiovascular disease; meta-analysis; diabetes
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The prevalence of obesity is reaching alarming figures in both industrialized and developing countries, to the point that it has become a major health problem. According to the World Health Organization, it is estimated that, around the world, approximately one-third of adults are overweight and one-tenth are obese. The upward trend in the prevalence of obesity is a cause of great concern due to the parallel increase in comorbidities associated with it.

In recent years, epidemiological studies on diet and health have changed their approach: before they focused on a single nutrient (e.g., dietary fat), and now they focus on the quality of the total diet and the dietary pattern. Improving lifestyle has been considered a key strategy to reduce the tendency to obesity, and diet—as one of the main components of lifestyle—plays a crucial role. An association between the different components of the diet, including energy, food groups, and nutrients, with obesity is suggested.

The aim of this proposed Special Issue on “Diet in the Management of Weight Loss” is to publish selected papers (reviews and/or clinical or experimental studies) dealing with trends of overweight and obesity and specific aspects related to the diet and nutrition and eating behaviors.

Dr. Vicente Martinez Vizcaino
Dr. Celia Álvarez Bueno
Dr. Iván Cavero Redondo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • overweight
  • obesity
  • BMI
  • weight status
  • weight loss
  • nutrition
  • diet

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
“An Important Part of Who I am”: The Predictors of Dietary Adherence among Weight-Loss, Vegetarian, Vegan, Paleo, and Gluten-Free Dietary Groups
Nutrients 2020, 12(4), 970; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12040970 - 01 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Weight-loss diets are notorious for their low adherence, which is a barrier to efforts to reduce population rates of overweight and obesity. However, there is some evidence that adherence is better among people on other kinds of diets, such as vegan and gluten [...] Read more.
Weight-loss diets are notorious for their low adherence, which is a barrier to efforts to reduce population rates of overweight and obesity. However, there is some evidence that adherence is better among people on other kinds of diets, such as vegan and gluten free. This study aimed to explore the predictors of dietary adherence across five restrictive dietary patterns (vegan, vegetarian, paleo, gluten free, and weight loss). This study used both qualitative and quantitative methods among 292 adult community members who were following a restrictive dietary pattern. Personality, mental health, and motivational predictors of adherence were examined. Substantial differences in adherence were found between dietary groups, with vegans and vegetarians being particularly high in adherence and gluten-free and weight-loss dieters being comparably low. Four consistent predictors of adherence across different dietary patterns were supported in both the quantitative and qualitative analyses. Self-efficacy and social identification with one’s dietary group positively predicted adherence. Conversely, being motivated in one’s dietary choices by mood or by weight control negatively predicted adherence. These findings speak to the importance of social and motivational factors in determining adherence. The results also illustrate the utility of looking beyond weight-loss dieters and virtuous individual traits for insights into how adherence may be improved. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet in the Management of Weight Loss)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Effect of Behavioral Weight Management Interventions Using Lifestyle mHealth Self-Monitoring on Weight Loss: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Nutrients 2020, 12(7), 1977; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12071977 - 03 Jul 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Alongside an increase in obesity, society is experiencing the development of substantial technological advances. Interventions that are easily scalable, such as lifestyle (including diet and physical activity) mobile health (mHealth) self-monitoring, may be highly valuable in the prevention and treatment of excess weight. [...] Read more.
Alongside an increase in obesity, society is experiencing the development of substantial technological advances. Interventions that are easily scalable, such as lifestyle (including diet and physical activity) mobile health (mHealth) self-monitoring, may be highly valuable in the prevention and treatment of excess weight. Thus, the aims of this systematic review and meta-analysis were to estimate the following: (i) the effect of behavioral weight management interventions using lifestyle mHealth self-monitoring on weight loss and (ii) the adherence to behavioral weight management interventions using lifestyle mHealth self-monitoring. MEDLINE via PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and the Web of Science databases were systematically searched. The DerSimonian and Laird method was used to estimate the effect of and adherence to behavioral weight management interventions using lifestyle mHealth self-monitoring on weight loss. Twenty studies were included in the systematic review and meta-analysis, yielding a moderate decrease in weight and higher adherence to intervention of behavioral weight management interventions using lifestyle mHealth self-monitoring, which was greater than other interventions. Subgroup analyses showed that smartphones were the most effective mHealth approach to achieve weight management and the effect of behavioral weight management interventions using lifestyle mHealth self-monitoring was more pronounced when compared to usual care and in the short-term (less than six months). Furthermore, behavioral weight management interventions using lifestyle mHealth self-monitoring showed a higher adherence than: (i) recording on paper at any time and (ii) any other intervention at six and twelve months. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet in the Management of Weight Loss)
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Open AccessReview
The Effects of Physical Activity and Diet Interventions on Body Mass Index in Latin American Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Nutrients 2020, 12(5), 1378; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051378 - 12 May 2020
Abstract
The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to compare the effect of physical activity only with that of physical activity plus diet interventions on body mass index (BMI) in Latin American children and adolescents. We searched the Medline, Embase, Scopus, Web [...] Read more.
The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to compare the effect of physical activity only with that of physical activity plus diet interventions on body mass index (BMI) in Latin American children and adolescents. We searched the Medline, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science, and Scielo databases from their inception until March 2020, including studies examining the effect of physical activity or physical activity plus diet interventions on BMI in children and adolescents and based on data from intervention studies. The DerSimonian and Laird method was used to compute a pooled standardized mean difference for BMI in terms of effect size (ES) and respective 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Eighteen studies were included. Analyses were performed based on intervention (four studies were included for physical activity only and four studies were included for physical activity plus diet). In the analysis of physical activity only versus control, there was no effect on BMI (ES = 0.00; 95% CI −0.17–0.17, I2 = 0.0%; p = 0.443). In the analysis of physical activity plus diet versus control, there was a decrease in BMI in favour of the intervention group (ES = −0.28; 95% CI −0.42–−0.14, I2 = 74.5%; p = 0.001). When ES was estimated considering only the effect in intervention groups, there was no evidence of a decrease in BMI (ES = −0.17; 95% CI −0.44–0.11, I2 = 84.5%; p < 0.001) for physical activity only (eight studies). However, there was a statistically significant decrease in BMI (ES = −0.30; 95% CI −0.50–0.11, I2 = 95.8%; p < 0.001) for physical activity plus diet (ten studies). Some limitations of this review could compromise our results, but the main limitation that should be stated is the quality of the studies (mainly medium/moderate), especially as physical activity and diet interventions cannot be blinded, compromising the quality of these studies. In summary, this meta-analysis offers evidence that physical activity plus diet interventions produced a reduction in BMI in Latin American children and adolescents, but physical activity only interventions did not. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet in the Management of Weight Loss)
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Open AccessReview
Effects of Rapid Weight Loss on Judo Athletes: A Systematic Review
Nutrients 2020, 12(5), 1220; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051220 - 26 Apr 2020
Abstract
Rapid weight loss (RWL) is commonly practiced among judo athletes. Although it helps them to gain the advantage over their lighter opponents, previous studies have shown that RWL can have a negative impact on the athlete’s performance and overall well-being. This systematic review [...] Read more.
Rapid weight loss (RWL) is commonly practiced among judo athletes. Although it helps them to gain the advantage over their lighter opponents, previous studies have shown that RWL can have a negative impact on the athlete’s performance and overall well-being. This systematic review aimed to synthesize the evidence that examines the influence of rapid weight loss on physiological parameters, biomarkers, and psychological well-being in judo athletes. We followed the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses guidelines. We searched for studies on Web of Science and PubMed that elaborate on the influence of ≥5% RWL achieved over ≤7-day period in judokas. Out of 52 studies initially found, 14 studies met our eligibility criteria and were included in the review. In total, we examined data from 1103 judo athletes. Retrieved studies showed conflicting data concerning physiological parameters and biomarkers, while psychological well-being parameters were more consistent than physiological and biomarkers. The feeling of tension, anger, and fatigue significantly increased while a decrease in vigor was demonstrated among athletes who lost weight rapidly. The evidence on the impact of RWL on performance remains ambiguous. More studies under standardized conditions are needed in order to provide firm evidence. Considering the harmful effects of RWL outlined in the existing literature, it is important to determine and monitor athlete’s minimal competitive weight to prioritize the health and safety of the athlete, emphasize fairness, and ultimately benefit the sport. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet in the Management of Weight Loss)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Effectiveness of eHealth interventions encouraging diet self-monitoring for weight loss: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Authors: Iván Cavero-Redondo
Affiliation: Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha

Title: Independent combine effect of healthy lfestyles on weight status in adolescents: DADOS study
Authors: Mireia Adelantado-Renau
Affiliation: Universidad Jaume I.

Title: Obesity-related eating behaviors and weight change according to occupational stress in schoolteachers: a 2-years follow-up study
Authors: Arthur E. Mesas
Affiliation: Universidade Estadual de Londrina

Title: Mediterranean diet and weight management in several mental disorders population: a cross sectional study.
Authors: Estela Jiménez-López
Affiliation: Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha

Title: The effects of physical activity and diet interventions on body mass index in latin american children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Authors: Andrés Godoy-Cumillaf
Affiliation: Universidad Autónoma de Chile

Title: Cognitive decline in older adults living with Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies according to nutritional status
Authors: Luis Carlos Venegas Sanabria
Affiliation: Pontificia Universidad Javeriana

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