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Plant-Based Diets in the Prevention of Inflammation

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemicals and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 September 2024 | Viewed by 1920

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Biotechnology, Microbiology and Human Nutrition, Faculty of Food Science and Biotechnology, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Skromna 8, 20-704 Lublin, Poland
Interests: Alzheimer’s disease; aging of the brain; human nutrition; food processing; food analysis; prevention of dementia
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E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biotechnology, Microbiology and Human Nutrition, Faculty of Food Science and Biotechnology, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Skromna 8, 20-704 Lublin, Poland
Interests: human nutrition; food processing; food analysis; prevention of dementia; nanoparticles in food; aging of the brain
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The aim of this SI is to expand the knowledge concerning the effect of plant-based diets on antioxidant and inflammatory activities in humans. The link between unbalanced antioxidative and anti-inflammatory status in body tissues and the role of nutraceuticals and supplementation of nutritional components on the health status of individuals will be the focus. 

Highly processed and low-processed (unprocessed) plant foods as game changers will be discussed, as well as methods of processing raw materials, especially using “green chemistry” philosophy.

The effect of digestion of all types of foods in the gastro-intestinal tract (raw, low-processed, highly transformed, etc.) on the antioxidant and inflammatory activity of food portions can be presented (using in vivo studies, as well as an in vitro model of the gastro-intestinal tract).

Original papers, comments and reviews discussing the following are welcome: composition of plant-based diets in the prevention of all types of disorders and diseases in which antioxidant and inflammatory imbalances play a role; holistic approach (using plant-based diets) to the prevention of all types of disorders/diseases caused by an antioxidant and inflammatory imbalance (highlighting genetic predispositions, gene expression regulation, physiological role in the body, interaction with microbiota/microbiome, role of contaminating compounds, role of food-borne toxins, metabolic syndrome, incorrect nutritional habits, etc.); reliable laboratory and clinical models to study risk factors concerning antioxidant and anti-inflammatory measurements in humans.

Prof. Dr. Dominik Szwajgier
Dr. Ewa Baranowska-Wójcik
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • plant-based diets
  • antioxidant activity
  • inflammatory
  • nutraceuticals and supplementation in plant-based diets
  • processing of plant foods
  • green chemistry
  • effect of digestion on the antioxidant and inflammatory activity of food
  • in vitro model of the gastro-intestinal tract
  • holistic approach
  • models to study antioxidant and anti-inflammatory status in humans

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 281 KiB  
Article
Research on Application of Japanese Quince (Chaenomeles L.) and Pork Collagen in Dark Chocolate—Benefits in Prevention of Inflammation In Vitro Model
by Szymon Byczkiewicz, Dominik Szwajgier, Ewa Baranowska-Wójcik, Aleksandra Telichowska, Krystyna Szymandera-Buszka, Janusz Wojtczak and Joanna Kobus-Cisowska
Nutrients 2024, 16(11), 1758; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16111758 - 4 Jun 2024
Viewed by 249
Abstract
In the present study, the effect of the addition of quince and collagen type I and III to dessert chocolate on its functional properties was determined. The study evaluated the antioxidant potential of the tested formulations using the FRAP method and the linoleic [...] Read more.
In the present study, the effect of the addition of quince and collagen type I and III to dessert chocolate on its functional properties was determined. The study evaluated the antioxidant potential of the tested formulations using the FRAP method and the linoleic acid oxidation test and beta-carotene bleaching test. The tested samples were also evaluated for inhibitory activity against enzymes important in preventive health (inflammation and neurodegenerative disorders) namely: AChE, BChE, GR, GPx, COX, and SOD. The addition of quince and collagen to the chocolate samples resulted in higher activity compared to the control sample, as indicated by the FRAP test. The experiment highlighted the impact of including quince fruit on the antioxidant activity of the chocolate samples. Interestingly, merely increasing the quince fruit amount did not consistently enhance antioxidant potential. Specifically, chocolate samples with a lower proportion of quince fruit (2 g/100 g) exhibited greater antioxidant activity when supplemented with collagen I. Conversely, in samples with higher quince percentages (3 g and 4 g), those enriched with collagen III showed higher antioxidant activity. Similar correlations were observed in the linoleic acid oxidation test. Notably, samples containing 3 g and 4 g of quince and type III collagen demonstrated statistically similar highest antioxidant properties. Regardless of the collagen type used, there was no observed increase in activity towards the tested enzymes for samples with the lowest percentage of quince fruit. Both collagen types exhibited the highest activity in the inhibition assay against acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase when combined with 3 g and 4 g of quince. Overall, the experimental incorporation of both fruit and collagen enhanced the chocolates’ activity. Similarly to the antioxidant activity findings, chocolates with lower quince fruit quantities showed increased activity when supplemented with collagen III, while those with higher quince content (3 g and 4 g) displayed higher activity with collagen I. Bitter chocolate by itself is an attractive food product, rich in many bioactive compounds. However, enriching it with other attractive raw materials can make its properties and taste even more attractive. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Based Diets in the Prevention of Inflammation)

Review

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23 pages, 2620 KiB  
Review
Composition of Whole Grain Dietary Fiber and Phenolics and Their Impact on Markers of Inflammation
by Jabir Khan, Palwasha Gul, Muhammad Tayyab Rashid, Qingyun Li and Kunlun Liu
Nutrients 2024, 16(7), 1047; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16071047 - 3 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1458
Abstract
Inflammation is an important biological response to any tissue injury. The immune system responds to any stimulus, such as irritation, damage, or infection, by releasing pro-inflammatory cytokines. The overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines can lead to several diseases, e.g., cardiovascular diseases, joint disorders, cancer, [...] Read more.
Inflammation is an important biological response to any tissue injury. The immune system responds to any stimulus, such as irritation, damage, or infection, by releasing pro-inflammatory cytokines. The overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines can lead to several diseases, e.g., cardiovascular diseases, joint disorders, cancer, and allergies. Emerging science suggests that whole grains may lower the markers of inflammation. Whole grains are a significant source of dietary fiber and phenolic acids, which have an inverse association with the risk of inflammation. Both cereals and pseudo-cereals are rich in dietary fiber, e.g., arabinoxylan and β-glucan, and phenolic acids, e.g., hydroxycinnamic acids and hydroxybenzoic acids, which are predominantly present in the bran layer. However, the biological mechanisms underlying the widely reported association between whole grain consumption and a lower risk of disease are not fully understood. The modulatory effects of whole grains on inflammation are likely to be influenced by several mechanisms including the effect of dietary fiber and phenolic acids. While some of these effects are direct, others involve the gut microbiota, which transforms important bioactive substances into more beneficial metabolites that modulate the inflammatory signaling pathways. Therefore, the purpose of this review is twofold: first, it discusses whole grain dietary fiber and phenolic acids and highlights their potential; second, it examines the health benefits of these components and their impacts on subclinical inflammation markers, including the role of the gut microbiota. Overall, while there is promising evidence for the anti-inflammatory properties of whole grains, further research is needed to understand their effects fully. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Based Diets in the Prevention of Inflammation)
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