Special Issue "Selected Papers from 2016 Annual Scientific Meeting of the Nutrition Society of New Zealand"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2017).

Special Issue Editors

Assoc. Prof. Rachel Brown
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Associate Professor, Department of Human Nutrition, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
Interests: nuts; nut consumption; cardiovascular disease; nutrition interventions; energy balance; consumer acceptance of nuts
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Sheila Skeaff
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Professor, Department of Human Nutrition,University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
President, Nutrition Society of New Zealand.
Tel. +643 479 7944
Interests: nutritional assessment; nutrient deficiency; minerals and trace elements; salt; lifecycle nutrition; food literacy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will comprise manuscripts of papers presented as either oral or poster presentations at the 2016 Annual Scientific Meeting of the Nutrition Society of New Zealand (http://www.nutritionsociety.ac.nz/newsandevents/society-meeting-2016). The Special Issue will also include a manuscript written by the postgraduate student who received the “Nutrients Prize” for Best Student Oral Presentation.

Assoc. Prof. Rachel Brown
Assoc. Prof. Shelia Skeaff
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Implementing a Health and Wellbeing Programme for Children in Early Childhood: A Preliminary Study
Nutrients 2017, 9(9), 1031; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9091031 - 18 Sep 2017
Cited by 4
Abstract
In New Zealand, there is a high prevalence of childhood poverty and food insecurity, which can impact a family’s ability to provide high quality, nutrient dense foods for their children. In an attempt to increase the quality of the food consumed by children [...] Read more.
In New Zealand, there is a high prevalence of childhood poverty and food insecurity, which can impact a family’s ability to provide high quality, nutrient dense foods for their children. In an attempt to increase the quality of the food consumed by children attending a decile two (low socio-economic) kindergarten and to address food insecurity issues, an educational health and wellness initiative, in conjunction with a free lunch programme, was introduced. The impact of the lunches and the effectiveness of the programme were evaluated. Baseline and end-intervention 24-h modified dietary recall questionnaire data and a vegetable- and fruit-specific food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) were collected. A follow-up FFQ was administered six months after the end of the intervention. The nutrient composition of the foods recorded in the 24-h recall questionnaires were analysed using FoodWorks8™. Whilst no significant differences were observed with the intakes of individual nutrients, there was a significant decrease in the consumption of ultra-processed snack foods (p = 0.015). The results of the follow-up FFQ, including the comments collected from the parents, suggested that the intervention had a longer-term positive impact on not only the children involved in the study but also on their whānau (wider family members) Full article
Open AccessArticle
Prediction Equations Overestimate the Energy Requirements More for Obesity-Susceptible Individuals
Nutrients 2017, 9(9), 1012; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9091012 - 13 Sep 2017
Cited by 1
Abstract
Predictive equations to estimate resting metabolic rate (RMR) are often used in dietary counseling and by online apps to set energy intake goals for weight loss. It is critical to know whether such equations are appropriate for those susceptible to obesity. We measured [...] Read more.
Predictive equations to estimate resting metabolic rate (RMR) are often used in dietary counseling and by online apps to set energy intake goals for weight loss. It is critical to know whether such equations are appropriate for those susceptible to obesity. We measured RMR by indirect calorimetry after an overnight fast in 26 obesity susceptible (OSI) and 30 obesity resistant (ORI) individuals, identified using a simple 6-item screening tool. Predicted RMR was calculated using the FAO/WHO/UNU (Food and Agricultural Organisation/World Health Organisation/United Nations University), Oxford and Miflin-St Jeor equations. Absolute measured RMR did not differ significantly between OSI versus ORI (6339 vs. 5893 kJ·d−1, p = 0.313). All three prediction equations over-estimated RMR for both OSI and ORI when measured RMR was ≤5000 kJ·d−1. For measured RMR ≤7000 kJ·d−1 there was statistically significant evidence that the equations overestimate RMR to a greater extent for those classified as obesity susceptible with biases ranging between around 10% to nearly 30% depending on the equation. The use of prediction equations may overestimate RMR and energy requirements particularly in those who self-identify as being susceptible to obesity, which has implications for effective weight management. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Fat Sensation: Fatty Acid Taste and Olfaction Sensitivity and the Link with Disinhibited Eating Behaviour
Nutrients 2017, 9(8), 879; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9080879 - 15 Aug 2017
Cited by 3
Abstract
Perception of fat taste, aroma, and texture are proposed to influence food preferences, thus shaping dietary intake and eating behaviour and consequently long-term health. In this study, we investigated associations between fatty acid taste, olfaction, mouthfeel of fat, dietary intake, eating behaviour, and [...] Read more.
Perception of fat taste, aroma, and texture are proposed to influence food preferences, thus shaping dietary intake and eating behaviour and consequently long-term health. In this study, we investigated associations between fatty acid taste, olfaction, mouthfeel of fat, dietary intake, eating behaviour, and body mass index (BMI). Fifty women attended three sessions to assess oleic acid taste and olfaction thresholds, the olfactory threshold for n-butanol and subjective mouthfeel ratings of custard samples. Dietary intake and eating behaviour were evaluated using a Food Frequency and Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire, respectively. Binomial regression analysis was used to model fat taste and olfaction data. Taste and olfactory detection for oleic acid were positively correlated (r = 0.325; p < 0.02). Oleic acid taste hypersensitive women had significantly increased n-butanol olfactory sensitivity (p < 0.03). The eating behaviour disinhibition and BMI were higher in women who were hyposensitive to oleic acid taste (p < 0.05). Dietary intake of nuts, nut spreads, and seeds were significantly correlated with high olfactory sensitivity to oleic acid (p < 0.01). These findings demonstrate a clear link between fatty acid taste sensitivity and olfaction and suggest that fat taste perception is associated with specific characteristics of eating behaviour and body composition. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
A Pilot Randomized Cross-Over Trial to Examine the Effect of Kiwifruit on Satiety and Measures of Gastric Comfort in Healthy Adult Males
Nutrients 2017, 9(7), 639; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9070639 - 22 Jun 2017
Cited by 2
Abstract
‘Hayward’ kiwifruit anecdotally are associated with improved gastrointestinal comfort following the consumption of high protein meals, possibly because of the presence of a protease enzyme, actinidin. The study aimed to use SmartPill™ technology to investigate the acute effect of kiwifruit with actinidin ( [...] Read more.
‘Hayward’ kiwifruit anecdotally are associated with improved gastrointestinal comfort following the consumption of high protein meals, possibly because of the presence of a protease enzyme, actinidin. The study aimed to use SmartPill™ technology to investigate the acute effect of kiwifruit with actinidin (Actinidia chinensis var. deliciosa ‘Hayward’) and kiwifruit without actinidin (A. chinensis var. chinensis ‘Hort16A’) on digestion of a large protein meal. Ten healthy male subjects were recruited. The participants attended the clinic three times, having fasted overnight. They consumed a test meal consisting of 400 g lean steak and two ‘Hort16A’ or two ‘Hayward kiwifruit’. Subjects completed visual analogue scales (VAS) by rating feelings of hunger, satisfaction, fullness, and comfort and swallowed a SmartPill™ before completing further VAS scales. After 5 h, participants consumed an ad libitum lunch to assess satiety. SmartPill™ transponders were worn for five days. There were no significant differences in gastric emptying time, small bowel, or colonic transit time between the two kiwifruit arms of the study measured by SmartPill™. Similarly, no significant differences were observed in VAS satiety measures or energy consumption at the ad libitum meal. However, the measurement of overall gastric comfort tended to be lower, and bloating was significantly reduced following the consumption of the steak meal with ‘Hayward’ kiwifruit (p < 0.028). Conclusions: The SmartPill™ is marketed as a diagnostic tool for patients presenting with gastrointestinal disorders and is usually used with a standard ‘SmartBar’. This small pilot study suggests that it is less likely to measure gastric emptying effectively following a high protein meal, as it may be delayed because of the meal’s physical consistency. However, green kiwifruit, containing actinidin, may reduce bloating and other measures of gastric discomfort in healthy males. Possible future studies could use repeated measures with more readily digested protein and larger numbers of participants. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Cold Storage and Reheating of Parboiled Rice on Postprandial Glycaemic Response, Satiety, Palatability and Chewed Particle Size Distribution
Nutrients 2017, 9(5), 475; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9050475 - 10 May 2017
Cited by 4
Abstract
Background: Globally, hot cooked refined rice is consumed in large quantities and is a major contributor to dietary glycaemic load. This study aimed to compare the glycaemic potency of hot- and cold-stored parboiled rice to widely available medium-grain white rice. Method: Twenty-eight [...] Read more.
Background: Globally, hot cooked refined rice is consumed in large quantities and is a major contributor to dietary glycaemic load. This study aimed to compare the glycaemic potency of hot- and cold-stored parboiled rice to widely available medium-grain white rice. Method: Twenty-eight healthy volunteers participated in a three-treatment experiment where postprandial blood glucose was measured over 120 min after consumption of 140 g of rice. The three rice samples were freshly cooked medium-grain white rice, freshly cooked parboiled rice, and parboiled rice stored overnight at 4 °C. All rice was served warm at 65 °C. Chewing time was recorded. Results: incremental area under the curve (iAUC) of the control rice, freshly cooked medium-grain white rice, was the highest: 1.7-fold higher (1.2, 2.6) than reheated parboiled rice (p < 0.001) and 1.5-fold higher (1.0, 2.2) than freshly cooked parboiled rice (p = 0.001). No significant difference in postprandial glycaemic response was observed between freshly cooked and reheated parboiled rice samples (p = 0.445). Chewing time for 10 g cold-stored parboiled rice was 6 s (25%) longer and was considered more palatable, visually appealing and better tasting than freshly cooked medium-grain (all p < 0.05). Conclusions: For regular consumers of rice, reheating cooked rice after cold storage would lower the dietary glycaemic load and, in the long term, may reduce the risk for type 2 and gestational diabetes. More trials are needed to identify the significance. Full article
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Open AccessCorrection
Correction: Rachel Brown and Sheila Skeaff. Nutrition Society of New Zealand Annual Conference Held in Christchurch, New Zealand, 8–9 December 2016. Nutrients 2017, 9, 348
Nutrients 2017, 9(6), 618; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9060618 - 16 Jun 2017
Cited by 1
Abstract
We would like to submit the following as a correction to our recently published Special Issue on the annual conference and scientific meeting of the Nutrition Society of New Zealand, 2016 [1]. [...]
Full article
Open AccessCommentary
Evolution not Revolution: Nutrition and Obesity
Nutrients 2017, 9(5), 519; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9050519 - 20 May 2017
Cited by 3
Abstract
The increasing prevalence of obesity over the course of life is a global health challenge because of its strong and positive association with significant health problems such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and some cancers. The complex causes and drivers of [...] Read more.
The increasing prevalence of obesity over the course of life is a global health challenge because of its strong and positive association with significant health problems such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and some cancers. The complex causes and drivers of obesity include genetic factors, social, ecological and political influences, food production and supply, and dietary patterns. Public health messages and government food and activity guidelines have little impact; the retail food environment has many low-priced, nutrient-poor, but energy-dense products and there is a gap between what an individual knows and what they do. Public health and education services need legislation to mandate supportive environments and promote food literacy. Two New Zealand case studies of proof-of-principle of positive change are described: Project Energize and Under 5 Energize as exemplars of school environment change, and the development of the Nothing Else™ healthier snack bar as an example of working with the food industry. Changes in food literacy alongside food supply will contribute in the long term to positive effects on the future prevalence of obesity and the onset of non-communicable disease. More cross-disciplinary translational research to inform how to improve the food supply and food literacy will improve the health and wellbeing of the economy and the population. Full article
Open AccessFeature PaperConference Report
Nutrition Society of New Zealand Annual Conference Held in Christchurch, New Zealand, 8–9 December 2016
Nutrients 2017, 9(4), 348; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9040348 - 01 Apr 2017
Cited by 1Correction
Abstract
The annual conference and scientific meeting of the Nutrition Society of New Zealand took place in Christchurch, New Zealand from 8–9 December 2016.[...] Full article
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