Special Issue "Sustainable Design for Safer Nanotechnology"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Biology and Medicines".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Sophie Carenco
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Guest Editor
CNRS, Sorbonne Université, Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Paris, Paris, France
Interests: nanomaterials, nanoparticles, materials design, reactivity, safer-by-design nanoparticles
Prof. Dr. Corinne Chanéac
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Guest Editor
Director of C'Nano, CNRS, Sorbonne Université, Paris, France
Interests: materials sciences, nanomaterials chemistry, physical chemistry
Dr. Mélanie Auffan
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Guest Editor
CEREGE, Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, IRD, Collège de France, INRA, Aix-en-Provence, France
Interests: environmental Sciences, physical-chemistry
Dr. Jérôme Rose
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
CEREGE, Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, IRD, Collège de France, INRA, Aix-en-Provence, France
Interests: environmental engineering, nanotechnology and inorganic chemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanomaterials generate scientific interest in the research community and a large number of industrial applications that involve manufactured nanomaterials (powders, composites, etc.). However, their nano-scale and properties raise the question of their risks for humanity and the environment. The benefit–risk balance remains a complex question that traditional models of risk analysis do not fully address.

The development of efficient nanomaterials should take into account these risks and their mitigation throughout the product lifecycle, in order to improve their societal acceptance. Indeed, beyond the specific expectations of stakeholders (manufacturers, potential users, and national and European authorities), there is a common need and concern for reliable applications in the market.

Specific guidelines to nanomaterials design have been proposed recently as the principles of ‘Design for Safer Nanotechnology’. To date, all these design principles have been largely untested and do not include sustainable criteria. It is time to further define general guidelines including sustainable criteria and to take into account the evolution of the materials within the whole life cycle.

This Special Issue will discuss complementary angles of the eco-design conception and synthesis of sustainable nanomaterial-containing products.

Dr. Sophie Carenco
Prof. Dr. Corinne Chanéac
Dr. Mélanie Auffan
Dr. Jérôme Rose
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanotoxicology
  • safer by design
  • eco-design
  • environmental applications and implications
  • product lifecycle

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Safe Administration of Carbon Nanotubes by Intravenous Pathway in BALB/c Mice
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(2), 400; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10020400 - 24 Feb 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1092
Abstract
Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are nanomaterials with multiple possible uses as drug carriers or in nanovaccine development. However, the toxicity of CNTs administered intravenously in in vivo models has not been fully described to date. This work aimed to evaluate the toxic effect of [...] Read more.
Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are nanomaterials with multiple possible uses as drug carriers or in nanovaccine development. However, the toxicity of CNTs administered intravenously in in vivo models has not been fully described to date. This work aimed to evaluate the toxic effect of pristine multi-walled CNTs (UP-CNTs), purified (P-CNTs), or CNTs functionalized with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-CNTs) administered by intravenous injection in BALB/c mice. Biochemical and histopathological parameters were analyzed at 1, 14, 29, and 60 days post-exposure. Pristine CNTs were the most toxic nanoparticles in comparison with P-CNTs or FITC-CNTs, increasing serum AST (≈ 180%), ALT (≈ 300%), and LDH (≈ 200%) levels at one day post-exposure. The urea/creatinine ratio suggested pre-renal injury at the 14th day accompanied of extensive lesions in kidneys, lungs, and liver. Biochemical and histological findings in mice exposed to P-CNTs had not significant differences compared to the controls. A lower toxic effect was detected in animals exposed to FITC-CNTs which was attributable to FITC toxicity. These results demonstrate that the purification process of CNTs reduces in vivo toxicity, and that toxicity in functionalized CNTs is dependent on the functionalized compound. Therefore, P-CNTs are postulated as potential candidates for safe biomedical applications using an intravenous pathway. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Design for Safer Nanotechnology)
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Open AccessArticle
Nano Zinc Oxide Induced Fetal Mice Growth Restriction, Based on Oxide Stress and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(2), 259; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10020259 - 02 Feb 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 898
Abstract
ZnO NPs have been assessed to show adverse effects on reproductive organs, but the molecular mechanisms of reproductive toxicity have not been sufficiently studied. In this research, the dosage effects from the oral exposure of ZnO NPs (30 nm) to pregnant mice in [...] Read more.
ZnO NPs have been assessed to show adverse effects on reproductive organs, but the molecular mechanisms of reproductive toxicity have not been sufficiently studied. In this research, the dosage effects from the oral exposure of ZnO NPs (30 nm) to pregnant mice in gestation day 10.5 to 17.5 was analyzed. Pregnant mice exposed to ZnO NPs induced dam injury, mice fetal growth restriction, and the fetus number decreased. The pathological evaluation showed that ZnO NPs exposure caused placental spongiotrophoblast area decease and structural damage. The RT-qPCR and immunocytochemistry data indicated that ZnO NPs could induce placenta oxide stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress responses, apoptosis, and altered placental function. These findings indicated that ZnO NPs could induce dam injury and fetal growth restriction. Reproductive toxicity of ZnO NPs may be due to placental injury and function alteration caused by apoptosis, oxide stress, and endoplasmic reticulum stress after ZnO NPs exposure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Design for Safer Nanotechnology)
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Open AccessArticle
Toxicity of TiO2, ZnO, and SiO2 Nanoparticles in Human Lung Cells: Safe-by-Design Development of Construction Materials
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(7), 968; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9070968 - 02 Jul 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1228
Abstract
Rapid progress in the development of highly efficient nanoparticle-based construction technologies has not always been accompanied by a corresponding understanding of their effects on human health and ecosystems. In this study, we compare the toxicological effects of pristine TiO2, ZnO, SiO [...] Read more.
Rapid progress in the development of highly efficient nanoparticle-based construction technologies has not always been accompanied by a corresponding understanding of their effects on human health and ecosystems. In this study, we compare the toxicological effects of pristine TiO2, ZnO, SiO2, and coated SiO2 nanoparticles, and evaluate their suitability as additives to consolidants of weathered construction materials. First, water soluble tetrazolium 1 (WST-1) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays were used to determine the viability of human alveolar A549 cells at various nanoparticle concentrations (0–250 μg mL−1). While the pristine TiO2 and coated SiO2 nanoparticles did not exhibit any cytotoxic effects up to the highest tested concentration, the pristine SiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles significantly reduced cell viability. Second, as all developed nanoparticle-modified consolidants increased the mechanical strength of weathered sandstone, the decisive criterion for the selection of the most suitable nanoparticle additive was as low toxicity as possible. We believe that this approach would be of high importance in the industry, to identify materials representing top functional properties and low toxicity, at an early stage of the product development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Design for Safer Nanotechnology)
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