Special Issue "Micro/Nano Emulsions: Smart Colloids for Multiple Applications"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Ruggero Angelico
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Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Food Sciences, University of Molise, I-86100 Campobasso, Italy
Interests: physicochemical properties of condensed matter at macro-, micro- and nanometer scale: surfactant systems, equilibrium phase behavior, and non-equilibrium phase transitions; micro- and macroemulsions, self-association in liquid–crystals, molecular diffusion modeling, and scattering techniques; colloidal dispersions in shear flow, rheology of soft materials
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Microemulsions are continuously attracting the interest of researchers due to their unique properties, such as ultralow interfacial tension between oil and water phases, large interfacial area, thermodynamic stability, and ability to solubilize otherwise immiscible liquids. They are colloidal fluids containing one surfactant film, classified as oil-in-water (o/w), water-in-oil (w/o) or bicontinuous systems depending on their microstructure. The shape of the aggregates can be spherical, rod-like, and even worm-like, all of them characterized by having at least one dimension of about 10–100 nm. Some of the numerous applications of microemulsions relate to their potential uses as drug delivery systems, for the design of new composite materials, personal care and cleaning products, pharmaceutical formulations, chemical reaction media, and in the art restoration and petrochemical industry.

Nanoemulsions are kinetically stable liquid dispersions, consisting only of nanodroplets with sizes of a few hundred nm. Although they do not form spontaneously but are obtained by mechanical force, nanoemulsions are widespread in the food, pharmaceutical, and personal care industries due to their unique physicochemical properties and functional attributes, such as high surface area per unit volume, transparent appearance, tunable rheology, and advanced bioavailability.

I warmly invite scholars involved in the Colloids and Surface Science research areas to contribute original research papers as well as review articles to this Special Issue, in order to give the readers of Nanomaterials an updated and new perspective of these versatile colloidal systems for all kinds of applications, including both small- and large-scale processes.

Prof. Ruggero Angelico
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • microstructure
  • micro-emulsion
  • nanoemulsion
  • titration method
  • droplet size
  • emulsifier
  • micelle
  • high-pressure homogenization
  • microfluidization
  • ultrasonic emulsification

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Interfacial and Bulk Stabilization of Oil/Water System: A Novel Synergistic Approach
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(2), 356; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10020356 - 18 Feb 2020
Abstract
Oil/water emulsions are usually stabilized either by interfacial modification using nanoparticles and surfactants (stated as pickering emulsion or bijels) or by bulk stabilization with the help of low-molecular-weight or polymeric gelators (known as bigels) in response to some external stimuli (e.g., pH, temperature). [...] Read more.
Oil/water emulsions are usually stabilized either by interfacial modification using nanoparticles and surfactants (stated as pickering emulsion or bijels) or by bulk stabilization with the help of low-molecular-weight or polymeric gelators (known as bigels) in response to some external stimuli (e.g., pH, temperature). Both these approaches result in different systems that are quite useful for different applications, including catalysis, pharmaceutical and agrochemicals. However, these systems also possess some inherent drawbacks that need to be addressed, like difficulty in fabrication and ensuring the permanent binding of nanoparticles at the oil/water interface, in case of nanoparticles stabilized emulsions (i.e., interfacial stabilization). Similarly, the long-term stability of the oil/water systems produced by using (hydro/organo) gelators (i.e., bulk stabilization) is a major concern. Here, we show that the oil/water system with improved mechanical and structural properties can be prepared with the synergistic effect of interfacial and bulk stabilization. We achieve this by using nanoparticles to stabilize the oil/water interface and polymeric gelators to stabilize the bulk phases (oil and water). Furthermore, the proposed strategy is extremely adaptable, as the properties of the resultant system can be finely tuned by manipulating different parameters such as nanoparticles content and their surface functionalization, solvent type and its volume fraction, and type and amount of polymeric gelators. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micro/Nano Emulsions: Smart Colloids for Multiple Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Two-Dimensional Clusters of Colloidal Particles Induced by Emulsion Droplet Evaporation
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(1), 156; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10010156 - 16 Jan 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The minimization principle of the second moment of the mass distribution ( M 2 ) is responsible for the unique structure of three-dimensional clusters by using emulsion droplet evaporation. Herein we study the structure of two-dimensional clusters of colloidal particles bound at the [...] Read more.
The minimization principle of the second moment of the mass distribution ( M 2 ) is responsible for the unique structure of three-dimensional clusters by using emulsion droplet evaporation. Herein we study the structure of two-dimensional clusters of colloidal particles bound at the interface of liquid droplets in the plane. We found that, differently from the three-dimensional system, the two-dimensional clusters have multiple degenerate configurations (isomers). An interesting feature of such two-dimensional clusters is that they have the same packings as those belonging to a class of geometric figures known as polyiamonds. In particular, except for the six-particle cluster, many higher order clusters of polyiamond have not been reported previously. Using a simple geometrical approach, based on the number of ways to generate a packing, we calculated the occupation probabilities of distinct isomeric clusters. The level of agreement with the results of metropolis Monte Carlo simulations was good for clusters containing up to nine particles, suggesting that our two-dimensional cluster structures are not a result of the minimization of the second moment. In addition, the structure of these clusters is somewhat insensitive to the range and depth of the interparticle potential, in good agreement with the results in the literature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micro/Nano Emulsions: Smart Colloids for Multiple Applications)
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