Special Issue "Nanopharmaceutics"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 13 March 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Anton Naumov
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physics and AstronomyTexas Christian UniversityTCU Box 298840Fort Worth, TX 76129, USA
Interests: nanomaterials; fluorescence; nanotubes; graphene; quantum dots; biomedical imaging; near-infrared; cancer nanotechnology; drug delivery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanomaterials have recently been utilized in a number of different applications in biotechnology, pioneering advances in the biomedical field through the areas of drug delivery, imaging, sensing, and tissue engineering. They have been demonstrated to substantially enhance treatment efficacy, protect healthy tissue from the adverse effects of toxic therapeutics, safely deliver degradable genetic medicines, target the therapies to the disease site, and serve as therapeutics on their own. Nanomaterials can be structurally adapted to a particular application and rendered biocompatible while facilitating the imaging and diagnostics of a variety of conditions. Such multifunctionality can address critical biomedical issues and enable novel advantageous pharmaceutic approaches.

This Special Issue of Nanomaterials aims to cover the latest advancements in the applications of nanomaterials in the development of pharmaceutical platforms and formulations for a variety of conditions. The scope of the issue includes drug and gene delivery, diagnostic or theranostic formulations, as well as nanomedicines.

Dr. Anton Naumov
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

Nanomaterials; drug delivery; drug transport; nanomedicine; imaging; targeting; photodynamic therapy; nanocomposite; fluorescence; MRI imaging; CT imaging; theranostic; nanosensor; nanoformulation; nanoparticles; nanorobotics; nanodiagnostics; nanobiotechnology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Assisted Antibiotic Delivery and Imaging in S. epidermidis Strains Addressing Antibiotic Resistance
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(12), 1685; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9121685 - 25 Nov 2019
Abstract
Although conventional antibiotics have evolved as a staple of modern medicine, increasing antibiotic resistance and the lack of antibiotic efficacy against new bacterial threats is becoming a major medical threat. In this work, we employ single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) known to deliver and [...] Read more.
Although conventional antibiotics have evolved as a staple of modern medicine, increasing antibiotic resistance and the lack of antibiotic efficacy against new bacterial threats is becoming a major medical threat. In this work, we employ single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) known to deliver and track therapeutics in mammalian cells via intrinsic near-infrared fluorescence as carriers enhancing antibacterial delivery of doxycycline and methicillin. SWCNTs dispersed in water by antibiotics without the use of toxic bile salt surfactants facilitate efficacy enhancement for both antibiotics against Staphylococcus epidermidis strain showing minimal sensitivity to methicillin. Doxycycline to which the strain did not show resistance in complex with SWCNTs provides only minor increase in efficacy, whereas the SWCNTs/methicillin complex yields up to 40-fold efficacy enhancement over antibiotics alone, suggesting that SWCNT-assisted delivery may circumvent antibiotic resistance in that bacterial strain. At the same time SWCNT/antibiotic formulations appear to be less toxic to mammalian cells than antibiotics alone suggesting that nanomaterial platforms may not restrict potential biomedical applications. The improvement in antibacterial performance with SWCNT delivery is tested via 3 independent assays—colony count, MIC (Minimal Inhibitory Concentration) turbidity and disk diffusion, with the statistical significance of the latter verified by ANOVA and Dunnett’s method. The potential mechanism of action is attributed to SWCNT interactions with bacterial cell wall and adherence to the membrane, as substantial association of SWCNT with bacteria is observed—the near-infrared fluorescence microscopy of treated bacteria shows localization of SWCNT fluorescence in bacterial clusters, scanning electron microscopy verifies SWCNT association with bacterial surface, whereas transmission electron microscopy shows individual SWCNT penetration into bacterial cell wall. This work characterizes SWCNTs as novel advantageous antibiotic delivery/imaging agents having the potential to address antibiotic resistance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanopharmaceutics)
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Open AccessArticle
Medium-Dependent Antibacterial Properties and Bacterial Filtration Ability of Reduced Graphene Oxide
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(10), 1454; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9101454 - 13 Oct 2019
Abstract
Toxicity of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) has been a topic of multiple studies and was shown to depend on a variety of characteristics of rGO and biological objects of interest. In this paper, we demonstrate that when studying the same dispersions of rGO [...] Read more.
Toxicity of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) has been a topic of multiple studies and was shown to depend on a variety of characteristics of rGO and biological objects of interest. In this paper, we demonstrate that when studying the same dispersions of rGO and fluorescent Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria, the outcome of nanotoxicity experiments also depends on the type of culture medium. We show that rGO inhibits the growth of bacteria in a nutrition medium but shows little effect on the behavior of E. coli in a physiological saline solution. The observed effects of rGO on E. coli in different media could be at least partially rationalized through the adsorption of bacteria and nutrients on the dispersed rGO sheets, which is likely mediated via hydrogen bonding. We also found that the interaction between rGO and E. coli is medium-dependent, and in physiological saline solutions they form stable flocculate structures that were not observed in nutrition media. Furthermore, the aggregation of rGO and E. coli in saline media was observed regardless of whether the bacteria were alive or dead. Filtration of the aggregate suspensions led to nearly complete removal of bacteria from filtered liquids, which highlights the potential of rGO for the filtration and separation of biological contaminants, regardless of whether they include live or dead microorganisms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanopharmaceutics)
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