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Open AccessArticle

In Vivo Biodistribution of Respirable Solid Lipid Nanoparticles Surface-Decorated with a Mannose-Based Surfactant: A Promising Tool for Pulmonary Tuberculosis Treatment?

1
Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 41125 Modena, Italy
2
Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, Goiás 74605-170, Brazil
3
Department of Engineering “Enzo Ferrari”, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 41125 Modena, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(3), 568; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10030568
Received: 2 March 2020 / Revised: 18 March 2020 / Accepted: 19 March 2020 / Published: 21 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanopharmaceutics)
The active targeting to alveolar macrophages (AM) is an attractive strategy to improve the therapeutic efficacy of ‘old’ drugs currently used in clinical practice for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis. Previous studies highlighted the ability of respirable solid lipid nanoparticle assemblies (SLNas), loaded with rifampicin (RIF) and functionalized with a novel synthesized mannose-based surfactant (MS), both alone and in a blend with sodium taurocholate, to efficiently target the AM via mannose receptor-mediated mechanism. Here, we present the in vivo biodistribution of these mannosylated SLNas, in comparison with the behavior of both non-functionalized SLNas and bare RIF. SLNas biodistribution was assessed, after intratracheal instillation in mice, by whole-body real-time fluorescence imaging in living animals and RIF quantification in excised organs and plasma. Additionally, SLNas cell uptake was determined by using fluorescence microscopy on AM from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and alveolar epithelium from lung dissections. Finally, histopathological evaluation was performed on lungs 24 h after administration. SLNas functionalized with MS alone generated the highest retention in lungs associated with a poor spreading in extra-pulmonary regions. This effect could be probably due to a greater AM phagocytosis with respect to SLNas devoid of mannose on their surface. The results obtained pointed out the unique ability of the nanoparticle surface decoration to provide a potential more efficient treatment restricted to the lungs where the primary tuberculosis infection is located. View Full-Text
Keywords: tuberculosis; in vivo administration; lipid nanoparticles; alveolar macrophages; active targeting tuberculosis; in vivo administration; lipid nanoparticles; alveolar macrophages; active targeting
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Truzzi, E.; Nascimento, T.L.; Iannuccelli, V.; Costantino, L.; Lima, E.M.; Leo, E.; Siligardi, C.; Gualtieri, M.L.; Maretti, E. In Vivo Biodistribution of Respirable Solid Lipid Nanoparticles Surface-Decorated with a Mannose-Based Surfactant: A Promising Tool for Pulmonary Tuberculosis Treatment? Nanomaterials 2020, 10, 568.

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