Special Issue "Design and Synthesis of Nanomaterials for Energy Storage"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy and Catalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Jung Sang Cho
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, South Korea
Interests: energy storage; nanostructures; nanomaterials; batteries; supercapacitors
Prof. Chungyeon Cho
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Wonkwang University, Iksan, Korea
Interests: polymer nanocomposites; thin films; energy harvesting; thermoelectricity; flame retardant

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is an ever-increasing demand for sustainable energy sources and reliable energy storage devices to substitute for traditional fossil fuels, which have raised serious environmental concerns. A rechargeable battery, which is the most successful energy storage device, stores electrical energy in electrodes via repeated charge–discharge processes. The development of suitable electrode materials, which govern the overall performance of batteries, is attracting research interest. However, to further improve their electrochemical properties, morphological and compositional optimizations should be taken into consideration in a way that offers high active surface area, mechanical stability, and a facile electron transport pathway during the electrochemical reaction. Thus, many research groups have put tremendous effort into synthesizing various nanostructured electrode materials, such as nanowires, nanorods, nanotubes, nanocages, nanosheets, and core-shell, porous, hierarchical, hollow, and yolk-shell structures, along with carbon modification. These structures provide more contact area between the electrode materials and electrolytes and more structural stability, exhibiting greatly enhanced electrochemical performance over bulk materials.

This Special Issue of Nanomaterials will attempt to cover the most recent advances in “Nanomaterials for Energy Storage”, concerning not only the design, synthesis, and characterization of such materials but also reports of their functional and smart properties to be applied in energy storage devices.

Prof. Jung Sang Cho
Prof. Chungyeon Cho
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Energy storage
  • Batteries
  • Supercapacitors
  • Advanced synthesis
  • Characterizations
  • Multifunctional materials

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Enhanced Humid Reliability of Organic Thermoelectrics via Crosslinking with Glycerol
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(11), 1591; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9111591 (registering DOI) - 09 Nov 2019
Abstract
Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) has shown significant achievements in organic thermoelectrics (TEs) as an alternative for inorganic counterparts. However, PEDOT:PSS films have limited practical applications because their performance is sensitive to humidity. Crosslinking additives are utilized to improve the reliability of PEDOT:PSS film through enhancing [...] Read more.
Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) has shown significant achievements in organic thermoelectrics (TEs) as an alternative for inorganic counterparts. However, PEDOT:PSS films have limited practical applications because their performance is sensitive to humidity. Crosslinking additives are utilized to improve the reliability of PEDOT:PSS film through enhancing hydrophobicity; among these, polyethylene glycol (PEG) is a widely-used additive. However, ether groups in PEG induce water molecules in the film through the hydrogen bond, which deteriorates the TE reliability. Here, we enhance the TE reliability of the PEDOT:PSS film using glycerol as an additive through the crosslinking reaction between the hydroxyl group in glycerol and the sulfonic acid in PEDOT:PSS. The TE reliability (1/Power factor (PF)) of PEG solution-treated PEDOT:PSS film (PEG solution-treated film) was 57% of its initial absolute value (0 h), after 288 h (two weeks) in a humid environment (95% relative humidity, 27 °C temperature). On the other hand, the glycerol solution-treated PEDOT:PSS film (glycerol solution-treated film) exhibited superior TE reliability and preserved 75% of its initial 1/PF. Furthermore, glycerol vapor treatment enabled the film to have stronger TE humid reliability, maintaining 82% of its initial 1/PF, with the same condition. This enhancement is attributed to the increased hydrophobicity and lower oxygen content of the glycerol vapor-treated PEDOT:PSS film (glycerol vapor-treated film), which provides little change in the chemical composition of PEDOT:PSS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design and Synthesis of Nanomaterials for Energy Storage)
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Open AccessArticle
Preparation of Highly Porous PAN-LATP Membranes as Separators for Lithium Ion Batteries
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(11), 1581; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9111581 - 07 Nov 2019
Abstract
Separators are a vital component to ensure the safety of lithium-ion batteries. However, the commercial separators employed in lithium ion batteries are inefficient due to their low porosity. In the present study, a simple electrospinning technique is adopted to prepare highly porous polyacrylonitrile [...] Read more.
Separators are a vital component to ensure the safety of lithium-ion batteries. However, the commercial separators employed in lithium ion batteries are inefficient due to their low porosity. In the present study, a simple electrospinning technique is adopted to prepare highly porous polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based membranes with a higher concentration of lithium aluminum titanium phosphate (LATP) ceramic particles, as a viable alternative to the commercialized separators used in lithium ion batteries. The effect of the LATP particles on the morphology of the porous membranes is demonstrated through Field emission scattering electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectra studies suitably demonstrate the mixing of PAN and LATP particles in the polymer matrix. PAN with 30 wt% LATP (P-L30) exhibits an enhanced porosity of 90% and is more thermally stable, with the highest electrolyte uptake among all the prepared membranes. Due to better electrolyte uptake, the P-L30 membrane demonstrates an improved ionic conductivity of 1.7 mS/cm. A coin cell prepared with a P-L30 membrane and a LiFePO4 cathode demonstrates the highest discharge capacity of 158 mAh/g at 0.5C rate. The coin cell with the P-L30 membrane also displays good cycling stability by retaining 87% of the initial discharge capacity after 200 cycles of charging and discharging at 0.5C rate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design and Synthesis of Nanomaterials for Energy Storage)
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Open AccessArticle
Porous Hybrid Nanofibers Comprising ZnSe/CoSe₂/Carbon with Uniformly Distributed Pores as Anodes for High-Performance Sodium-Ion Batteries
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(10), 1362; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9101362 - 23 Sep 2019
Abstract
Well-designed porous structured bimetallic ZnSe/CoSe₂/carbon composite nanofibers with uniformly distributed pores were prepared as anodes for sodium-ion batteries by electrospinning and subsequent simple heat-treatment processes. Size-controlled polystyrene (PS) nanobeads in the electrospinning solution played a key role in the formation and uniform distribution [...] Read more.
Well-designed porous structured bimetallic ZnSe/CoSe₂/carbon composite nanofibers with uniformly distributed pores were prepared as anodes for sodium-ion batteries by electrospinning and subsequent simple heat-treatment processes. Size-controlled polystyrene (PS) nanobeads in the electrospinning solution played a key role in the formation and uniform distribution of pores in the nanofiber structure, after the removal of selected PS nanobeads during the heat-treatment process. The porous ZnSe/CoSe₂/C composite nanofibers were able to release severe mechanical stress/strain during discharge–charge cycles, introduce larger contact area between the active materials and the electrolyte, and provide more active sites during cycling. The discharge capacity of porous ZnSe/CoSe2/C composite nanofibers at the 10,000th cycle was 297 mA h g−1, and the capacity retention measured from the second cycle was 81%. The final rate capacities of porous ZnSe/CoSe2/C composite nanofibers were 438, 377, 367, 348, 335, 323, and 303 mA h g−1 at current densities of 0.1, 0.5, 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 A g−1, respectively. At the higher current densities of 10, 20, and 30 A g−1, the final rate capacities were 310, 222, and 141 mA h g−1, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design and Synthesis of Nanomaterials for Energy Storage)
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