Special Issue "Nanomaterials and Devices"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Wan Sik Hwang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Materials Engineering, Korea Aerospace University, Goyang, South Korea
Interests: nanomaterials; thin film transistors; memory devices, ferroelectric devices; nanostructures; semiconductor doping; metal oxides; nanofabrication; Semiconductor physics; dielectric materials; electrical properties; graphene oxide; graphene nanoribbons; photocatalysts; low-dimensional semiconductors
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the past two decades, we have witnessed tremendous growth in the areas of electronics, photonics, bionics, and magnetic devices. These advancements have become ubiquitous in our daily lives and have even changed the way we think. Moreover, this trend continues unabated. To continually benefit society, more advanced devices are being developed and investigated. Unfortunately, device performance is often limited by material properties. Unlike conventional bulk materials, nanomaterials with huge surface-to-volume ratios offer unique electrical, optical, thermal, magnetic, and chemical properties that collectively contribute to the development of advanced devices that are lighter, faster, and of higher performance and low power consumption. To take full advantage of nanomaterials in devices, more research should be conducted in the areas of preparation, characterization, performance, and safety.

In this Special Issue of Nanomaterials, we expect contributions from a broad community of scientists and engineers working on nanomaterials for various device applications, including electronics, photonics, bionics, and magnetic devices. We also anticipate manuscripts dealing with the safety of nanomaterials embedded in advanced devices.

Dr. Wan Sik Hwang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanoscale devices
  • Graphene devices
  • Transition metal dichalcogenide devices
  • Nanowire and nanorod devices
  • Ultrathin film transistor

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
High-Performance Humidity Sensor Based on the Graphene Flower/Zinc Oxide Composite
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(1), 242; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11010242 - 18 Jan 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 833
Abstract
Performance of an electronic device relies heavily on the availability of a suitable functional material. One of the simple, easy, and cost-effective ways to obtain novel functional materials with improved properties for desired applications is to make composites of selected materials. In this [...] Read more.
Performance of an electronic device relies heavily on the availability of a suitable functional material. One of the simple, easy, and cost-effective ways to obtain novel functional materials with improved properties for desired applications is to make composites of selected materials. In this work, a novel composite of transparent n-type zinc oxide (ZnO) with a wide bandgap and a unique structure of graphene in the form of a graphene flower (GrF) is synthesized and used as the functional layer of a humidity sensor. The (GrF/ZnO) composite was synthesized by a simple sol–gel method. Morphological, elemental, and structural characterizations of GrF/ZnO composite were performed by a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and an x-ray diffractometer (XRD), respectively, to fully understand the properties of this newly synthesized functional material. The proposed humidity sensor was tested in the relative humidity (RH) range of 15% RH% to 86% RH%. The demonstrated sensor illustrated a highly sensitive response to humidity with an average current change of 7.77 μA/RH%. Other prominent characteristics shown by this device include but were not limited to high stability, repeatable results, fast response, and quick recovery time. The proposed humidity sensor was highly sensitive to human breathing, thus making it a promising candidate for various applications related to health monitoring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials and Devices)
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Article
Highly Aligned Polymeric Nanowire Etch-Mask Lithography Enabling the Integration of Graphene Nanoribbon Transistors
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(1), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11010033 - 25 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 906
Abstract
Graphene nanoribbons are a greatly intriguing form of nanomaterials owing to their unique properties that overcome the limitations associated with a zero bandgap of two-dimensional graphene at room temperature. Thus, the fabrication of graphene nanoribbons has garnered much attention for building high-performance field-effect [...] Read more.
Graphene nanoribbons are a greatly intriguing form of nanomaterials owing to their unique properties that overcome the limitations associated with a zero bandgap of two-dimensional graphene at room temperature. Thus, the fabrication of graphene nanoribbons has garnered much attention for building high-performance field-effect transistors. Consequently, various methodologies reported previously have brought significant progress in the development of highly ordered graphene nanoribbons. Nonetheless, easy control in spatial arrangement and alignment of graphene nanoribbons on a large scale is still limited. In this study, we explored a facile, yet effective method for the fabrication of graphene nanoribbons by employing orientationally controlled electrospun polymeric nanowire etch-mask. We started with a thermal chemical vapor deposition process to prepare graphene monolayer, which was conveniently transferred onto a receiving substrate for electrospun polymer nanowires. The polymeric nanowires act as a robust etching barrier underlying graphene sheets to harvest arrays of the graphene nanoribbons. On varying the parametric control in the process, the size, morphology, and width of electrospun polymer nanowires were easily manipulated. Upon O2 plasma etching, highly aligned arrays of graphene nanoribbons were produced, and the sacrificial polymeric nanowires were completely removed. The graphene nanoribbons were used to implement field-effect transistors in a bottom-gated configuration. Such approaches could realistically yield a relatively improved current on–off ratio of ~30 higher than those associated with the usual micro-ribbon strategy, with the clear potential to realize reproducible high-performance devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials and Devices)
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Article
Graphene Templated DNA Arrays and Biotin-Streptavidin Sensitive Bio-Transistors Patterned by Dynamic Self-Assembly of Polymeric Films Confined within a Roll-on-Plate Geometry
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(8), 1468; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10081468 - 27 Jul 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1157
Abstract
Patterning of surfaces with a simple strategy provides insights into the functional interfaces by suitable modification of the surface by novel techniques. Especially, highly ordered structural topographies and chemical features from the wide range of interfaces have been considered as important characteristics to [...] Read more.
Patterning of surfaces with a simple strategy provides insights into the functional interfaces by suitable modification of the surface by novel techniques. Especially, highly ordered structural topographies and chemical features from the wide range of interfaces have been considered as important characteristics to understand the complex relationship between the surface chemistries and biological systems. Here, we report a simple fabrication method to create patterned surfaces over large areas using evaporative self-assembly that is designed to produce a sacrificial template and lithographic etch masks of polymeric stripe patterns, ranging from micrometer to nanoscale. By facilitating a roll-on-plate geometry, the periodically patterned surface structures formed by repetitive slip-stick motions were thoroughly examined to be used for the deposition of the Au nanoparticles decorated graphene oxide (i.e., AuNPs, ~21 nm) and the formation of conductive graphene channels. The fluorescently labeled thiol-modified DNA was applied on the patterned arrays of graphene oxide (GO)/AuNPs, and biotin-streptavidin sensitive devices built with graphene-based transistors (GFETs, effective mobility of ~320 cm2 V−1 s−1) were demonstrated as examples of the platform for the next-generation biosensors with the high sensing response up to ~1 nM of target analyte (i.e., streptavidin). Our strategy suggests that the stripe patterned arrays of polymer films as sacrificial templates can be a simple route to creating highly sensitive biointerfaces and highlighting the development of new chemically patterned surfaces composed of graphene-based nanomaterials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials and Devices)
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