Special Issue "Nanostructured Carbons for Environmental and Energy Technologies"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 October 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Luisa Pastrana-Martínez
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Guest Editor
Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Granada, Granada, Spain
Interests: doped carbon materials, graphene derivatives, adsorption, and advanced oxidation technologies (heterogeneous photocatalysis, photo-Fenton, ozonation) for water treatment; CO2 photocatalytic conversion; oxygen reduction reaction
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Sergio Morales-Torres
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Guest Editor
Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Granada, Granada, Spain
Interests: nanostructured carbon materials; structured catalysts and membranes; advanced oxidation processes; air/water treatment; desalination
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Francisco Carrasco-Marín
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Guest Editor
Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Granada, Granada, Spain
Interests: carbon materials; energy materials; electro-catalysis; energy storage; supercapacitors; heterogeneous catalysis; green chemistry and environmental chemistry
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Carbon-based nano-materials are increasingly present in many aspects of current science and technology. These materials present a wide variety of properties with unique applications in different fields of biomedicine, catalysis, or energy such as: drug delivery systems, catalytic reactions, air and wastewater treatment, clean and renewable energies, green chemistry, hydrogen production and storage, energy storage, CO2 capture and transformation, polymers and new materials, among others.

The special issue will be devoted to new developments and fundamental advances on carbon materials covering both fundamental and applied aspects in the preparation of these materials from different precursors, their characterization through a broad spectrum of experimental techniques and its behavior in environmental processes and for energy conversion and storage.

It is our pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, short communications, and reviews are welcome.

Dr. Luisa M. Pastrana-Martínez
Dr. Sergio Morales-Torres
Prof. Francisco Carrasco Marín
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanostructured carbon materials
  • carbon catalyst
  • heterogeneous catalysis
  • photocatalysis
  • electrocatalysis
  • fuels & chemicals
  • environmental catalysis

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Biomass-Derived Carbon Molecular Sieves Applied to an Enhanced Carbon Capture and Storage Process (e-CCS) for Flue Gas Streams in Shallow Reservoirs
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(5), 980; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10050980 - 20 May 2020
Abstract
It is possible to take advantage of shallow reservoirs (<300 m) for CO2 capture and storage in the post-combustion process. This process is called enhanced carbon capture and storage (e-CCS). In this process, it is necessary to use a nano-modifying agent to [...] Read more.
It is possible to take advantage of shallow reservoirs (<300 m) for CO2 capture and storage in the post-combustion process. This process is called enhanced carbon capture and storage (e-CCS). In this process, it is necessary to use a nano-modifying agent to improve the chemical-physical properties of geological media, which allows the performance of CO2 selective adsorption to be enhanced. Therefore, this study presents the development and evaluation of carbon sphere molecular nano-sieves (CSMNS) from cane molasses for e-CSS. This is the first report in the scientific literature on CSMNS, due to their size and structure. In this study, sandstone was used as geological media, and was functionalized using a nanofluid, which was composed of CNMNS dispersed in deionized water. Finally, CO2 or N2 streams were used for evaluating the adsorption process at different conditions of pressure and temperature. As the main result, the nanomaterial allowed a natural selectivity towards CO2, and the sandstone enhanced the adsorption capacity by an incremental factor of 730 at reservoir conditions (50 °C and 2.5 MPa) using a nanoparticle mass fraction of 20%. These nanofluids applied to a new concept of carbon capture and storage for shallow reservoirs present a novel landscape for the control of industrial CO2 emissions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Carbons for Environmental and Energy Technologies)
Open AccessArticle
Improving Electrochemical Properties of Polypyrrole Coatings by Graphene Oxide and Carbon Nanotubes
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(3), 507; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10030507 - 11 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Nanostructured polypyrrole coating was applied on carbon paper via simple dip-coating and electrochemical approach. Hybridization with nanocarbon materials (graphene oxide (GO) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)) and their effect as an anchoring hybrid layer for the growth of polypyrrole towards improving electrochemical properties [...] Read more.
Nanostructured polypyrrole coating was applied on carbon paper via simple dip-coating and electrochemical approach. Hybridization with nanocarbon materials (graphene oxide (GO) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)) and their effect as an anchoring hybrid layer for the growth of polypyrrole towards improving electrochemical properties are studied. The loading of each component and their w/w ratio were evaluated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy were employed to characterize the properties of the coatings. The electrochemical properties were investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The results indicated the electrodeposition of polypyrrole is enhanced by the addition of MWCNTs to the GO layer due to the formation of a hierarchical network. The electrochemical performance of the modified electrode was shown to be highly dependent on the employed w/w ratio, reaching a capacitance value of about 40 mF cm−2 for a carbon paper substrate modified with GO:MWCNT in a w/w ratio of 1:2.5 and PPy layer deposited by cyclic voltammetry for 30 cycles. The contribution to total stored charge was found to be primary from the inner capacitance component of about 95.5% contribution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Carbons for Environmental and Energy Technologies)
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Open AccessArticle
N, S Dual-Doped Carbon Derived from Dye Sludge by Using Polymeric Flocculant as Soft Template
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(7), 991; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9070991 - 09 Jul 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Dye sludge is a major by-product and it will bring critical environmental problems in the textile industry. In this study, dicyandiamide formaldehyde resin (DFR) is used as an effective flocculating agent for the removal of anionic dyes from textile dye wastewater. Employing dye-contaminated [...] Read more.
Dye sludge is a major by-product and it will bring critical environmental problems in the textile industry. In this study, dicyandiamide formaldehyde resin (DFR) is used as an effective flocculating agent for the removal of anionic dyes from textile dye wastewater. Employing dye-contaminated sewage sludges as precursors, N, S dual-doped carbon materials are successfully synthesized by using DFR as a soft template. The specific surface area, morphology, and pore structure of the resulting annealed products can be easily controlled by changing the DFR content of the dye sludge. The oxygen reduction reaction performance of optimal carbon material (N, S-DF-2) is close to commercial 20% Pt/C in alkaline medium, including onset potential (0.98 V), half-wave potential (0.82 V), as well as limiting current density (5.46 mA·cm−2). Furthermore, it also shows better durability and crossover resistance. In addition, N, S-DF-2 exhibits a large specific capacitance (230 F·g−1 at 1 A·g−1) and super capacitance retention (nearly 98% at 10 A·g−1) after 2500 cycles as supercapacitors electrodes. This work opens up a new method to take full advantage of organic polymeric flocculant as a soft template to prepare N, S dual-doped carbon materials, which will be beneficial for the reuse and recycling of sewage sludge, as well as for the production of good quality energy conversion and storage materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Carbons for Environmental and Energy Technologies)
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Open AccessCommunication
From Polyethylene to Highly Graphitic and Magnetic Carbon Spheres Nanocomposites: Carbonization under Pressure
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(4), 606; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9040606 - 12 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Carbon nanocomposites microspheres were synthesized from Low-Density Polyethylene (LDPE) by a facile one-step strategy under solvent-free conditions. The synthesis of these materials was carried out in a closed Hastelloy® reactor at 700 °C. The treatment, during which autogenic pressure was generated, leads [...] Read more.
Carbon nanocomposites microspheres were synthesized from Low-Density Polyethylene (LDPE) by a facile one-step strategy under solvent-free conditions. The synthesis of these materials was carried out in a closed Hastelloy® reactor at 700 °C. The treatment, during which autogenic pressure was generated, leads to highly graphitic materials with stunning properties, particularly concerning the oxidation resistance (compared to the graphite stability). The metallic doping triggers the growth of nanostructures with diverse morphologies around the spheres, obtaining samples with magnetic properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Carbons for Environmental and Energy Technologies)
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Open AccessArticle
Immobilization of P. stutzeri on Activated Carbons for Degradation of Hydrocarbons from Oil-in-Saltwater Emulsions
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(4), 500; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9040500 - 01 Apr 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Production water is the largest byproduct of the oil industry and must be treated before disposal, either by reinjection or shedding processes, with the purpose of eliminating emulsified crude oil and avoiding the operational and toxic problems associated with it. The objective of [...] Read more.
Production water is the largest byproduct of the oil industry and must be treated before disposal, either by reinjection or shedding processes, with the purpose of eliminating emulsified crude oil and avoiding the operational and toxic problems associated with it. The objective of this work was to immobilize a hydrocarbon-degrading strain on activated carbons, to evaluate the biocomplex’s capacity for catalyzing hydrocarbons from Oil in Brine emulsions (O/W) simulating produced waters. Activated carbons were prepared and their chemical and porous properties were estimated by XPS, pHPZC and SEM, N2 adsorption, and mercury porosimetry. Biomaterials were synthesized and hydrocarbon removal tests were performed. The basic and neutral carbons immobilized Pseudomonas stutzeri by physisorption in the macroporous space and electrostatic interactions (108–109 UFC∙g−1), while acid materials inhibited bacterial growth. Removal of aromatic hydrocarbons was more efficient using materials (60%–93%) and biomaterials (16%–84%) than using free P. stutzeri (1%–47%), and the removal efficiencies of crude oil were 22%, 48% and 37% for P. stutzeri and two biomaterials, respectively. The presence of minor hydrocarbons only when P. stutzeri was present confirmed the biotransformation process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Carbons for Environmental and Energy Technologies)
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Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Solvothermal Conditions on the Properties of Three-Dimensional N-Doped Graphene Aerogels
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(3), 350; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9030350 - 03 Mar 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
Low-density three-dimensional (3D) N-doped graphene aerogels by a one-step solvothermal method in the presence of ethylenediamine (EDA) are reported. The gelation, formation, and properties of the aerogels were studied with solvothermal conditions, namely, operating temperature, time, graphene oxide (GO) concentration, and the GO/EDA [...] Read more.
Low-density three-dimensional (3D) N-doped graphene aerogels by a one-step solvothermal method in the presence of ethylenediamine (EDA) are reported. The gelation, formation, and properties of the aerogels were studied with solvothermal conditions, namely, operating temperature, time, graphene oxide (GO) concentration, and the GO/EDA w/w ratio. Two ranges of solvothermal conditions are employed: one involving an operating temperature below 100 °C and a conventional chemical reduction of GO with EDA at atmospheric pressure and a second one employing a higher temperature range up to 165 and a high pressure reduction with EDA. The results show that both solvothermal approaches allow for the fabrication of homogeneous N-doped 3D graphene aerogels with density values close to 10 mg cm−3. The measurements indicated that low values of GO concentration, temperature, and EDA are optimum for obtaining low-density 3D aerogels. N doping is improved with an EDA amount in lower temperature conditions. The N doping mechanism below 100 °C is dominated by the epoxy ring opening while at temperatures up to 165 °C both epoxy ring opening and amidation take place. The CO2 adsorption properties are strongly controlled by the nitrogen configuration, namely, pyridinic nitrogen in terms of its density. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Carbons for Environmental and Energy Technologies)
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