Special Issue "Nanosized Luminescent Materials: Advances and Applications"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (17 December 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Dragana Jovanović

Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P. O. BOX 522, 11001 Belgrade, Serbia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: inorganic luminescent material; colloids; semiconductors, polymer nanocomposites, photocatalysts; synthesis; structural analysis; optical and spectroscopic properties; applications of nanoparticles in: photonics and optoelectronics, biology and medicine, chemical and (bio)sensors, phototherapy, antimicrobial agents, and fluorescent labels
Guest Editor
Dr. Lidia Zur

Enrico Fermi Center & CNR-IFN, CSMFO Lab. and FBK Photonics Unit, via alla Cascata 56/C, Povo, 38123 Trento, Italy
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Interests: glass photonics; glass-ceramics; nanomaterials; rare earths; sol-gel method; high-temperature melt quenching method; optical and spectroscopic properties; structure and processing of glasses; glass-ceramics and films for optical applications and photonics; energy transfer
Guest Editor
Dr. Maurizio Ferrari

Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnology, National Research Council, IFN-CNR CSMFO Lab. via alla Cascata 56/C, Povo, 38123 Trento, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: glass photonics; properties, structure and processing of glasses, crystals and film for optical applications and photonics; integrated optics; transparent glass ceramics; confined structures including photonic crystals, waveguides, microcavities, and microresonators

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Design and preparation of nanosized inorganic, either semiconductor or the rare earth doped, luminescent materials with improved performance have aroused considerable interest in recent years due to their unique structural, physicochemical, and, most importantly, spectrosopic properties.

The scope of the present special issue is broad, aiming to promote synergies and support for a multidisciplinary audience interested in being updated both in their own research field and correlated areas. This special issue aims to extensively cover main scientific and technological areas related to Nanosized Luminescent Materials with particular emphasis on new functional devices structured at the subwavelength scale, and the extension of operating wavelengths into the blue/UV and Mid-infrared regions. Luminescent nano objects and systems and derived photonic structures are among the forefront enabling technologies to address successfully social-economical challenges that we are facing in many fields going from health care to security, from environmental protection to advanced manufacturing.

In particular, the rare earth activated nanomaterials are used in everyday life with a wide spectrum of applications in manufacturing nanoscale electronic, optoelectronic and sensing devices, lasers, solid-state lighting, solar-cells, biological imaging, biosensors and photothermal therapy. Different preparation methods allow us to obtain various nanosized materials, such as: powders, colloids, quantum dots, thin films, planar waveguides, and photonic crystals.

Through this Special Issue, in order to present the state of the art applications of the nanosized, both luminescent large-band-gap semiconductor and the rare earth doped luminiscent materials, we aim to particularly highlight their spectroscopic properties resulting from synthesis, stabilization, modification and (bio) functionalization of the surface.

Dr. Dragana Jovanović
Dr. Lidia Zur
Dr. Maurizio Ferrari
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • (Bio)Functionalization
  • Aerospace, defense, security
  • Bioimaging
  • Biosensors
  • Chemical sensors
  • Clean energy
  • Colloidal route
  • Colloids
  • Co-precipitation method
  • Displays
  • Down-conversion
  • Energy transfer
  • Frequency conversion
  • Glass ceramics
  • Healthcare
  • High temperature melt quenching method
  • Hydro(solvo)thermal method
  • Integrated optics
  • Laser ablation
  • Laser materials processing
  • Laser writing
  • Laser-assisted manufacturing and micro/nano fabrication
  • Lasers
  • Long-lasting luminescent systems
  • Luminescence
  • Modeling and simulation
  • Microcavities
  • Nanomaterials
  • Optical communications
  • Phosphors
  • Photon management
  • Photonic crystals
  • Photothermal therapy
  • Photovoltaics
  • Planar waveguides
  • Powders
  • Quantum dots
  • Quantum optics
  • Quantum technologies
  • Rare earths
  • Reverse micelles
  • Scintillators
  • Sensing
  • Single photon sources and detectors
  • Solar-cells
  • Sol-gel method
  • Solid-state lighting
  • Spectroscopic properties
  • Structural health monitoring
  • Subwavelenghts luminescent nanobjects
  • Switches, modulators
  • Thin films
  • Ultrasonic spray pyrolysis
  • Up-conversion

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
KMnF3:Yb3+,Er3+ Core-Active-Shell Nanoparticles with Broadband Down-Shifting Luminescence at 1.5 μm for Polymer-Based Waveguide Amplifiers
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(3), 463; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9030463
Received: 22 February 2019 / Revised: 13 March 2019 / Accepted: 14 March 2019 / Published: 20 March 2019
PDF Full-text (3635 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In this study, we prepared cubic-phase oleic-acid-coated KMnF3: Yb3+,Er3+ nanoparticles (NPs) and NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ NPs, which were about 23 nm. From the down-shifting emissions spectra of the two NPs obtained by 980 nm excitation, [...] Read more.
In this study, we prepared cubic-phase oleic-acid-coated KMnF3: Yb3+,Er3+ nanoparticles (NPs) and NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ NPs, which were about 23 nm. From the down-shifting emissions spectra of the two NPs obtained by 980 nm excitation, we observed the fact that the KMnF3: 18%Yb3+,1%Er3+ NPs were a luminescent material with a broadband near-infrared emission of 1.5 μm, and full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 55 cm−1, which was wider than that of the NaYF4: 18%Yb3+,1% NPs. Therefore, we believe that the oleic-acid-coated KMnF3:Yb3+,Er3+ NPs have great potential in fabricating broadband waveguide amplifiers. Through epitaxial growth of a KMnF3: Yb3+ active-shell on the core NPs, we compounded KMnF3:Yb3+,Er3+@KMnF3:Yb3+ core-active-shell NPs whose 1.5-μm infrared emissions intensity was 3.4 times as strong as that of the core NPs. In addition, we manufactured waveguide amplifiers using KMnF3:18%Yb3+,1%Er3+@KMnF3:2%Yb3+ NPs as the core materials of the waveguide amplifiers. When the input signal power was 0.2 mW and the pump power was 200 mW, we achieved a relative gain of 0.6 dB at 1534 nm in a 10-mm long waveguide. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanosized Luminescent Materials: Advances and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Facile Synthesis of Ternary Alloy of CdSe1-xSx Quantum Dots with Tunable Absorption and Emission of Visible Light
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(12), 979; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8120979
Received: 21 October 2018 / Revised: 18 November 2018 / Accepted: 21 November 2018 / Published: 27 November 2018
PDF Full-text (8153 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The synthesis of alloyed semiconductor quantum dots has produced structures that have distinct properties in comparison with both their bulk counterparts and their parent binary semiconductor quantum dots. In this work, the quantum confined structures of a ternary alloy of CdSe1−x [...] Read more.
The synthesis of alloyed semiconductor quantum dots has produced structures that have distinct properties in comparison with both their bulk counterparts and their parent binary semiconductor quantum dots. In this work, the quantum confined structures of a ternary alloy of CdSe1−xSx were synthesized by one-pot synthesis method in an aqueous medium at a low temperature and capped with 3-mercaptopropoionic acid. Structures of the synthesized quantum dots were investigated by energy dispersive X-ray, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The obtained quantum dots had modified cubic structures as proven by X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction. The optical properties of the synthesized quantum dots were characterized by optical absorption, photoluminescence, and color analysis. Optical absorption investigation revealed a widening of the band gap of CdSe1−xSx with increasing S content. This widening increased for the samples suspended in water relative to the samples measured in powder form due to the difference in the environment of the two cases. The size determined from the optical absorption measurements was found to be compatible with the sizes obtained from the X-ray diffraction with the value of bowing parameter around 1, which indicated a graded diffusion of sulfur. It was also ascertained that the emission of different compositions covered the most visible range with a small full width at half maximum. The x and y values of the chromaticity coordinates decreased with increasing sulfur content of up to 15%, while the z value increased. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanosized Luminescent Materials: Advances and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Aggregation-Induced Emission of Tetraphenylethene-Conjugated Phenanthrene Derivatives and Their Bio-Imaging Applications
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(9), 728; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8090728
Received: 13 August 2018 / Revised: 12 September 2018 / Accepted: 13 September 2018 / Published: 15 September 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (2293 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, a series of rationally designed emissive phenanthrene derivatives were synthesized and their aggregation-induced emission (AIE) properties in tetrahydrofuran (THF)/water mixtures were investigated. Two tetraphenylethene (TPE) segments were conjugated to both ends of the phenanthrene core at the para-positions and [...] Read more.
In this study, a series of rationally designed emissive phenanthrene derivatives were synthesized and their aggregation-induced emission (AIE) properties in tetrahydrofuran (THF)/water mixtures were investigated. Two tetraphenylethene (TPE) segments were conjugated to both ends of the phenanthrene core at the para-positions and meta-positions, resulting in pTPEP and mTPEP derivatives, respectively. While the TPE-conjugated phenanthrene derivatives did not show any emission when dissolved in pure THF, they showed strong sky-blue emissions in water-THF mixtures, which is attributed to the restriction of intramolecular motions of TPE segments by aggregation. Furthermore, silica nanoparticles loaded with these AIE-active compounds were prepared and proved to be promising intracellular imaging agents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanosized Luminescent Materials: Advances and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Gold Rod-Polyethylene Glycol-Carbon Dot Nanohybrids as Phototheranostic Probes
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(9), 706; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8090706
Received: 21 August 2018 / Revised: 3 September 2018 / Accepted: 5 September 2018 / Published: 10 September 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3025 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Emphasis using phototheranostics has been placed on the construction of multifunctional nanoplatforms for simultaneous tumor diagnosis and therapy. Herein, we put forth a novel nanosized luminescent material using the incorporation of red emissive carbon dots on gold nanorods through polyethylene glycol as a [...] Read more.
Emphasis using phototheranostics has been placed on the construction of multifunctional nanoplatforms for simultaneous tumor diagnosis and therapy. Herein, we put forth a novel nanosized luminescent material using the incorporation of red emissive carbon dots on gold nanorods through polyethylene glycol as a covalent linkage for dual-modal imaging and photothermal therapy. The novel nanohybrids, not only retain the optical properties of the gold nanorod and carbon dots, but also possess superior imaging performance in both confocal laser scanning microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The nanohybrids also exhibit excellent photothermal performance as phototheranostic nanohybrid probes for in vitro assays. This study promises a new multifunctional nanoplatform for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanosized Luminescent Materials: Advances and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Synthesis of Small Ce3+-Er3+-Yb3+ Tri-Doped BaLuF5 Active-Core-Active-Shell-Active-Shell Nanoparticles with Strong Down Conversion Luminescence at 1.5 μm
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(8), 615; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8080615
Received: 9 July 2018 / Revised: 3 August 2018 / Accepted: 3 August 2018 / Published: 14 August 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2235 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Small fluoride nanoparticles (NPs) with strong down-conversion (DC) luminescence at 1.5 μm are quite desirable for optical fiber communication systems. Nevertheless, a problem exists regarding how to synthesize small fluoride NPs with strong DC emission at 1.5 μm. Herein, we propose an approach [...] Read more.
Small fluoride nanoparticles (NPs) with strong down-conversion (DC) luminescence at 1.5 μm are quite desirable for optical fiber communication systems. Nevertheless, a problem exists regarding how to synthesize small fluoride NPs with strong DC emission at 1.5 μm. Herein, we propose an approach to improve 1.5 μm emission of BaLuF5:Yb3+,Er3+ NPs by way of combining doping Ce3+ ions and coating multiple BaLuF5: Yb3+ active-shells. We prepared the BaLuF5:18%Yb3+,2%Er3+,2%Ce3+ NPs through a high-boiling solvent method. The effect of Ce3+ concentration on the DC luminescence was systematically investigated in the BaLuF5:Yb3+,Er3+ NPs. Under a 980 nm laser excitation, the intensities of 1.53 μm emission of BaLuF5:18%Yb3+,2%Er3+,2%Ce3+ NPs was enhanced by 2.6 times comparing to that of BaLuF5:18%Yb3+,2%Er3+ NPs since the energy transfer between Er3+ and Ce3+ ions: Er3+:4I11/2 (Er3+) + 2F5/2 (Ce3+) → 4I13/2 (Er3+) + 2F7/2 (Ce3+). Then, we synthesized BaLuF5:18%Yb3+,2%Er3+,2%Ce3+@BaLuF5:5%Yb3+@BaLuF5:5%Yb3+ core-active-shell-active-shell NPs via a layer-by-layer strategy. After coating two BaLuF5:Yb3+ active-shell around BaLuF5:Yb3+,Er3+,Ce3+ NPs, the intensities of the 1.53 μm emission was enhanced by 44 times compared to that of BaLuF5:Yb3+,Er3+ core NPs, since the active-shells could be used to not only suppress surface quenching but also to transfer the pump light to the core region efficiently through Yb3+ ions inside the active-shells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanosized Luminescent Materials: Advances and Applications)
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Open AccessCommunication
Functional Group Effects on the HOMO–LUMO Gap of g-C3N4
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(8), 589; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8080589
Received: 17 July 2018 / Revised: 27 July 2018 / Accepted: 31 July 2018 / Published: 3 August 2018
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (2965 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) is a promising semiconductor material which has been widely studied in nanoscience. However, the effect of modifying the performance of g-C3N4 is still under debate. In this communication, we show the size [...] Read more.
Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) is a promising semiconductor material which has been widely studied in nanoscience. However, the effect of modifying the performance of g-C3N4 is still under debate. In this communication, we show the size and functional group effects on the g-C3N4 using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It was found that a molecule with six repeated g-C3N4 units (g-C3N4-6) could be the smallest unit that converges to the limit of its HOMO–LUMO gap. Calculations of g-C3N4-6 with varying numbers of substituted C≡N, C=O, and O−H functional groups show that C≡N and C=O could narrow down the HOMO–LUMO gap, while O−H could slightly raise the gap. This study shows that the change of substituents could tune the band gap of g-C3N4, suggesting that rationally modifying the substituent at the edge of g-C3N4-based materials could help to significantly increase the photocatalytic properties of a metal-free g-C3N4. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanosized Luminescent Materials: Advances and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Efficient Blue to Red Afterglow Tuning in a Binary Nanocomposite Plastic Film
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(4), 260; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8040260
Received: 13 March 2018 / Revised: 16 April 2018 / Accepted: 16 April 2018 / Published: 20 April 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1697 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Colorful spectra are important for the diverse applications of persistent phosphors. A color conversion concept is developed to obtain abundant persistent luminescence color by mining capacities of known persistent phosphors with the most efficient persistent properties. Here, SiO2/Sr2MgSi2 [...] Read more.
Colorful spectra are important for the diverse applications of persistent phosphors. A color conversion concept is developed to obtain abundant persistent luminescence color by mining capacities of known persistent phosphors with the most efficient persistent properties. Here, SiO2/Sr2MgSi2O7:Eu,Dy nanoparticles are chosen as a blue persistent luminescence donor nanophosphor, while ultrafine CaAlSiN3:Eu is utilized as a red conversion phosphor to tune the persistent luminescence spectra from blue to red. The red afterglow emission can persist for more than 5 h. The decay of the red afterglow follows nearly the same kinetics as that of the blue one. Continuous color tuning can be successfully obtained by simply changing the mass ratio of the donor/conversion phosphor pair. This color conversion strategy may be significant in indicating numerous persistent/conversion nanocomposites or nanostructures and advance the development of persistent phosphors in diverse fields which need colorful spectral properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanosized Luminescent Materials: Advances and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of the Composition of Lanthanide Complexes on Their Luminescence Enhancement by [email protected]2 Core-Shell Nanoparticles
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(2), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8020098
Received: 17 December 2017 / Revised: 5 February 2018 / Accepted: 5 February 2018 / Published: 9 February 2018
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (2800 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Metal-enhanced luminescence of lanthanide complexes by noble metal nanoparticles has attracted much attention because of its high efficiency in improving the luminescent properties of lanthanide ions. Herein, nine kinds of europium and terbium complexes—RE(TPTZ)(ampca)3·3H2O, RE(TPTZ)(BA)3·3H2O, [...] Read more.
Metal-enhanced luminescence of lanthanide complexes by noble metal nanoparticles has attracted much attention because of its high efficiency in improving the luminescent properties of lanthanide ions. Herein, nine kinds of europium and terbium complexes—RE(TPTZ)(ampca)3·3H2O, RE(TPTZ)(BA)3·3H2O, RE(phen)(ampca)3·3H2O, RE(phen)(PTA)1.5·3H2O (RE = Eu, Tb) and Eu(phen)(BA)3·3H2O (TPTZ = 2,4,6-tri(2-pyridyl)-s-triazine, ampca = 3-aminopyrazine-2-carboxylic acid, BA = benzoic acid, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, PTA = phthalic acid)—have been synthesized. Meanwhile, seven kinds of core-shell [email protected]2 nanoparticles of two different core sizes (80–100 nm and 40–60 nm) and varied shell thicknesses (5, 12, 20, 30 and 40 nm) have been prepared. The combination of these nine types of lanthanide complexes and seven kinds of [email protected]2 nanoparticles provides an opportunity for a thorough investigation of the metal-enhanced luminescence effect. Luminescence spectra analysis showed that the luminescence enhancement factor not only depends on the size of the [email protected]2 nanoparticles, but also strongly relates to the composition of the lanthanide complexes. Terbium complexes typically possess higher enhancement factors than their corresponding europium complexes with the same ligands, which may result from better spectral overlap between the emission bands of Tb complexes and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) absorption bands of [email protected]2. For the complexes with the same lanthanide ion but varied ligands, the complexes with high enhancement factors are typically those with excitation wavelengths located nearby the SPR absorption bands of [email protected]2 nanoparticles. These findings suggest a combinatorial chemistry strategy is necessary to obtain an optimal metal-enhanced luminescence effect for lanthanide complexes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanosized Luminescent Materials: Advances and Applications)
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