Special Issue "Doping in Systems Derived by Chemical or Physical Deposition Techniques for Environmental and Energy Application"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Nanoscience and Nanotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Stanislav Kurajica
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, University of Zagreb, Marulićev trg 20, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: nanomaterials; ceramics; glass-ceramics; catalysts; pigments; advanced methods of chemical synthesis; structure; optical properties; thermal properties; XRD; thermal analysis
Dr. Vilko Mandić
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, University of Zagreb, Marulićev trg 20, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: nanomaterials; thin-films/coatings; composites; ceramics; (micro)structure; GIXRD; spectroscopies; catalysts; sol-gel/wet-chemistry; chemical and physical depositions; solar-cells; hybrid-OPV; supercapacitors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Esteemed colleagues, you are invited to contribute to the Special issue “Doping in Systems Derived by Chemical or Physical Deposition Techniques for Environmental and Energy Application”. This special issue welcomes novel manuscripts dealing with previously unpublished advances in the following areas:

1. Functionality—applicability for solar cells, catalysis, sensors, sorbents, pigments, etc. based on enhancing of charge transfer efficiency, mobility, recombination hindering, etc.

2. Synthesis—slight modifications of the compositions by means of substitutional, interstitial, or surface defect-based doping, including precursors and post-processing.

3. Deposition—control of doping in films deposited using chemical methods (self-assembly, chelation, sol-gel, solvothermal, coatings, castings, etc.) and physical methods (ablation, sputtering, evaporation, atomic, vapor, etc.).

4. Compatibility—interfacing issues (surface compatibility, boundary conditions) in the area of composites based on doped materials.

5. Characterization—techniques monitoring (micro)structural, optoelectronic, mechanochemical, catalytic, thermodynamic, and other material’s repercussions that may be modified as a consequence of the doping.

6. Design—novel systems in terms of modeling compositions, compounds, morphologies, etc. and novel in-situ or in-operando experiments for multi-technique monitoring of reaction kinetics, stability, aging, etc. all as a consequence of the doping.

Prof. Dr. Stanislav Kurajica
Dr. Vilko Mandić
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • doping
  • sol-gel
  • chemical deposition
  • physical deposition
  • catalysis
  • environmental application
  • energy application
  • stability
  • sorbents

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
3D Networks of Ge Quantum Wires in Amorphous Alumina Matrix
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(7), 1363; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10071363 - 13 Jul 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 877
Abstract
Recently demonstrated 3D networks of Ge quantum wires in an alumina matrix, produced by a simple magnetron sputtering deposition enables the realization of nanodevices with tailored conductivity and opto-electrical properties. Their growth and ordering mechanisms as well as possibilities in the design of [...] Read more.
Recently demonstrated 3D networks of Ge quantum wires in an alumina matrix, produced by a simple magnetron sputtering deposition enables the realization of nanodevices with tailored conductivity and opto-electrical properties. Their growth and ordering mechanisms as well as possibilities in the design of their structure have not been explored yet. Here, we investigate a broad range of deposition conditions leading to the formation of such quantum wire networks. The resulting structures show an extraordinary tenability of the networks’ geometrical properties. These properties are easily controllable by deposition temperature and Ge concentration. The network’s geometry is shown to retain the same basic structure, adjusting its parameters according to Ge concentration in the material. In addition, the networks’ growth and ordering mechanisms are explained. Furthermore, optical measurements demonstrate that the presented networks show strong confinement effects controllable by their geometrical parameters. Interestingly, energy shift is the largest for the longest quantum wires, and quantum wire length is the main parameter for control of confinement. Presented results demonstrate a method to produce unique materials with designable properties by a simple self-assembled growth method and reveal a self-assembling growth mechanism of novel 3D ordered Ge nanostructures with highly designable optical properties. Full article
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