Special Issue "Stem Cells and Nanotechnology"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 27 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Claudia Giachino
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, Orbassano, Turin, Italy
Interests: Bio-nanotechnology; Genetic stability; Innovative therapy; Regenerative medicine; Stem cell biology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Stem cells and nanotechnology represent the tools of regenerative medicine, having the potential to provide new therapeutic availability and efficacy over conventional medicine. Indeed, the advent of nanotechnology and the discovery of the complex networks and stimuli that regulate cell fate processes have resulted in rapid advances in the healthcare scenario. The amalgamation of stem cell research with nanotechnology brings new prospects to stem cell therapy: it improves the specificity of the treatment, it controls stem cell proliferation, and it directs stem cell differentiation. Nanotechnology allows for the manipulation of highly advanced surfaces/scaffolds for optimal regulation of cellular behaviour; indeed, the role of nanoscale topography in scaffold design has gained much importance in regenerative medicine. Surely, the combination of stem cells with sophisticated nano-structured materials and scaffolds is going to be increasingly beneficial in all areas of regenerative medicine.

This Special Issue of Nanomaterials will publish high-quality research papers, short communications, and reviews covering the most recent advances from active researchers in the fields of nanomedicine, regenerative medicine, and bio-nanomaterials, concerning not only synthesis, preparation, and characterization, but especially focusing on applications of such innovative approaches in elevated medical-need settings. Techniques such as electrospinning, soft lithography, microfluidics, carbon nanotubes, and nanostructured hydrogel are relevant for this Special Issue, along with their potential usage in regenerative medicine. While the potential applications for nanotechnology in stem cell research are countless, stem cells and nanotechnology topics include, but are not limited to, the following three categories:

  • ŸTracking or labelling (visualizing stem cells using Fluorescent NPs, MRI and SPIO particles, QDs, etc.);
  • Delivery (applying nucleotide delivery for genetic control of stem cell fate, delivering chemicals or drugs, etc.);
  • Scaffold/platforms (optimizing the stem cell environment, etc.).

Prof. Dr. Claudia Giachino
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomaterial
  • drug targeting
  • intelligent nanosystem
  • cell-nanoparticle interaction
  • cell tracking

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Toxicity and Functional Impairment in Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Stromal Cells (hASCs) Following Long-Term Exposure to Very Small Iron Oxide Particles (VSOPs)
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(4), 741; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10040741 - 13 Apr 2020
Abstract
Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs), such as very small iron oxide NPs (VSOPs) can be used for targeted drug delivery, cancer treatment or tissue engineering. Another important field of application is the labelling of mesenchymal stem cells to allow in vivo tracking and visualization of [...] Read more.
Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs), such as very small iron oxide NPs (VSOPs) can be used for targeted drug delivery, cancer treatment or tissue engineering. Another important field of application is the labelling of mesenchymal stem cells to allow in vivo tracking and visualization of transplanted cells using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For these NPs, however, various toxic effects, as well as functional impairment of the exposed cells, are described. The present study evaluates the influence of VSOPs on the multilineage differentiation ability and cytokine secretion of human adipose tissue derived stromal cells (hASCs) after long-term exposure. Human ASCs were labelled with VSOPs, and the efficacy of the labelling was documented over 4 weeks in vitro cultivation of the labelled cells. Unlabelled hASCs served as negative controls. Four weeks after labelling, adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation was histologically evaluated and quantified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Changes in gene expression of IL-6, IL-8, VEGF and caspase 3 were determined over 4 weeks. Four weeks after the labelling procedure, labelled and unlabelled hASCs did not differ in the gene expression of IL-6, IL-8, VEGF and caspase 3. Furthermore, the labelling procedure had no influence on the multidifferentiation ability of hASC. The percentage of labelled cells decreased during in vitro expansion over 4 weeks. Labelling with VSOPs and long-term intracellular disposition probably have no influence on the physiological functions of hASCs. This could be important for the future in vivo use of iron oxide NPs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stem Cells and Nanotechnology)
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Open AccessCommunication
Effect of Topography and Physical Stimulus on hMSC Phenotype Using a 3D In Vitro Model
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(4), 522; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9040522 - 03 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
This communication reports the first comparative study addressing the effects of both structural architecture and mechanical loading on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) positioned at the interface of a 3D in vitro model composed of a nanofibre/hydrogel laminate composite. hMSC phenotype was affected [...] Read more.
This communication reports the first comparative study addressing the effects of both structural architecture and mechanical loading on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) positioned at the interface of a 3D in vitro model composed of a nanofibre/hydrogel laminate composite. hMSC phenotype was affected by both stimuli over a seven-day period. Cells were orientated parallel to the underlying fibre direction irrespective of environment (electrospun 2D fibre sheet or laminate 2D sheet with collagen gel layer). Application of cyclical tensile force (5% strain, 1 Hz, 1 h per day) encouraged hMSCs to remain at the fibre/gel interface, whereas cells cultured in static conditions migrated from the interface to the upper hydrogel layer. Depending on the stimulus applied, hMSCs presented an up-regulation in gene expression, indicative of several cell lineages, with those cultured at the interface and physically stimulated expressing markers indicative of angiogenesis, osteogenesis, and tenogenesis. This study highlights the importance of developing biomaterial scaffolds with environmental cues to specifically drive cells towards the tissue intended for bioengineering. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stem Cells and Nanotechnology)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Nanocarriers as Magic Bullets in the Treatment of Leukemia
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(2), 276; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10020276 - 06 Feb 2020
Abstract
Leukemia is a type of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell malignancy characterized by the accumulation of immature cells in the blood and bone marrow. Treatment strategies mainly rely on the administration of chemotherapeutic agents, which, unfortunately, are known for their high toxicity and side effects. [...] Read more.
Leukemia is a type of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell malignancy characterized by the accumulation of immature cells in the blood and bone marrow. Treatment strategies mainly rely on the administration of chemotherapeutic agents, which, unfortunately, are known for their high toxicity and side effects. The concept of targeted therapy as magic bullet was introduced by Paul Erlich about 100 years ago, to inspire new therapies able to tackle the disadvantages of chemotherapeutic agents. Currently, nanoparticles are considered viable options in the treatment of different types of cancer, including leukemia. The main advantages associated with the use of these nanocarriers summarized as follows: i) they may be designed to target leukemic cells selectively; ii) they invariably enhance bioavailability and blood circulation half-life; iii) their mode of action is expected to reduce side effects. FDA approval of many nanocarriers for treatment of relapsed or refractory leukemia and the desired results extend their application in clinics. In the present review, different types of nanocarriers, their capability in targeting leukemic cells, and the latest preclinical and clinical data are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stem Cells and Nanotechnology)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Nanoengineering in Cardiac Regeneration: looking back and going forward
Authors: C. Cristallini, E. Vitale, C. Giachino*, R. Rastaldo*
Abstract: To deliver on the promise of cardiac regeneration, an integration process between an emerging field, nanomedicine, and a more consolidated one, tissue engineering, has begun. Our work is aimed at summarizing some of the most relevant prevailing cases of nanotechnological approaches applied to tissue engineering with a specific interest in cardiac regenerative medicine, as well as delineating some of the most compelling forthcoming orientations. Specifically, this review will start with a brief statement on the relevant clinical need, and then will debate how nanotechnology can be combined with tissue engineering to the scope of mimicking a complex tissue like the myocardium and its natural extracellular matrix (ECM). The interaction of relevant stem, precursor and differentiated cardiac cells with nanoengineered scaffolds will be thoroughly presented. Another correspondingly relevant area of experimental study enclosing both nanotechnology and cardiac regeneration, eg, nanoparticle applications in cardiac tissue engineering, will also be discussed.

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