Special Issue "Preparation and Application of Nanostructured Glass–Ceramics and Nanocomposites"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Inorganic Materials and Metal-Organic Frameworks".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Jerzy Garbarczyk
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw, Poland
Interests: solid state ionics; ionic and mixed electronic–ionic conductors used in energy conversion and storage systems; nanomaterials; thermal nanocrystallization of glasses; glass–ceramics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We invite you to contribute to the Special Issue of Nanomaterials, which is devoted to various preparation and characterization methods of different kinds of nanocomposites and nanostructured glass–ceramic systems, including: materials with special electrical and magnetic properties, systems of minimal thermal expansion, with special optical properties, machinable glass–ceramics, high-strength and high-toughness systems, bioactive glass–ceramics, and others (not mentioned above).

In the Special Issue, we hope to present a big variety of experimental methods used to study physical properties of nanostructured glass–ceramics and nanocomposites, including their microstructure, morphology, chemical and phase composition, and also mechanical, thermal, electric, magnetic, and optical properties. The issue is open for contributions related to various aspects of transport phenomena in glass–ceramics and nanocomposites, such as thermal, electronic, ionic, and mixed conductivity. The studies of other physical phenomena, connected with structural, mechanical, optical, dielectric, and magnetic properties of nanocomposites and glass–ceramics are also expected.

The Special Issue is mainly devoted to the processing, characterization, and application of nanostructured glass–ceramics (e.g., in all-solid-state batteries and many other devices), but contributions focused on basic research and computer simulations are also very welcome.

Prof. Jerzy Garbarczyk
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • glass–ceramics
  • nanocomposites
  • nanomaterials
  • nanocrystallization
  • nanoparticles
  • heterogeneous materials
  • microstructure

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Article
Sintering-Based In-Situ Synthesis and Characterization by TEM of Noble Metal Nanoparticles for Ceramic Glaze Color Control
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(8), 2103; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11082103 - 19 Aug 2021
Viewed by 534
Abstract
Gold and silver salt mixtures are incorporated in ceramic glazes for in situ development of mixtures of gold and silver nanoparticles (NPs) that subsequently allow for a wide spectrum of low metal loading color control within ceramic materials. Prior work has shown that [...] Read more.
Gold and silver salt mixtures are incorporated in ceramic glazes for in situ development of mixtures of gold and silver nanoparticles (NPs) that subsequently allow for a wide spectrum of low metal loading color control within ceramic materials. Prior work has shown that gold NPs can be used to create vibrant, color-rich red pigments in high-temperature ceramic and glass applications, though the achievable diameter of the gold NP ultimately limits the available range of color. The current study significantly expands color control from traditional gold nanoparticle red through silver nanoparticle green via the alteration of gold-to-silver salt ratios incorporated in the glaze formulations prior to sintering. Nanoparticle-based coloring systems are tested in both oxidative and reductive firing atmospheres. While the oxidation environment is found to be prohibitive for silver NP stability, the reductive atmosphere is able to form and sustain mixtures of gold and silver NPs across a wide color spectrum. All glazes are analyzed via reflectance spectrometry for color performance and samples are characterized via TEM and EDS for composition and sizing trends. This study creates new groundwork for a color-controlled NP system based on noble metal ratio blends that are both nontoxic and achieved with radically lower metal pigment loading than traditional glazes. Full article
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Article
B2O3-Doped LATP Glass-Ceramics Studied by X-ray Diffractometry and MAS NMR Spectroscopy Methods
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(2), 390; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11020390 - 03 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 795
Abstract
Two families of glasses in the Li2O-Al2O3-B2O3-TiO2-P2O5 system were prepared via two different synthesis routes: melt-quenching and ball-milling. Subsequently, they were submitted to crystallization and yielded the Li [...] Read more.
Two families of glasses in the Li2O-Al2O3-B2O3-TiO2-P2O5 system were prepared via two different synthesis routes: melt-quenching and ball-milling. Subsequently, they were submitted to crystallization and yielded the Li1.3Al0.3Ti1.7(PO4)3 (LATP)-based glass-ceramics. Glasses and corresponding glass-ceramics were studied by complementary X-ray diffraction (XRD) and 27Al, 31P, 7Li, 11B magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) methods in order to compare their structure and phase composition and elucidate the impact of boron additive on their glass-forming properties and crystallization process. XRD studies show that the addition of B2O3 improves the glass-forming properties of glasses prepared by either method and inhibits the precipitation of unwanted phases during heat treatment. MAS NMR studies allowed us to distinguish two LATP phases of slightly different chemical composition suggesting that LATP grains might not be homogeneous. In conclusion, the crystallization of boron-incorporated LATP glasses can is an effective way of obtaining LATP-based solid state electrolytes for the next generation of lithium-ion batteries provided the proper heat-treatment conditions are chosen. Full article
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Article
High Electronically Conductive Tungsten Phosphate Glass-Ceramics
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(12), 2515; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10122515 - 15 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 640
Abstract
High electronically conductive tungsten phosphate glass-ceramics have been prepared by the controlled crystallization of binary 60WO3–40P2O5 glass in the temperature range from 700 to 935 °C and for 1 to 24 h. The substantial increase in the conductivity [...] Read more.
High electronically conductive tungsten phosphate glass-ceramics have been prepared by the controlled crystallization of binary 60WO3–40P2O5 glass in the temperature range from 700 to 935 °C and for 1 to 24 h. The substantial increase in the conductivity for four orders of magnitude is a result of the formation of electronically conductive W2O3(PO4)2 and WO3 phases. At low crystallization temperature the dominant W2O3(PO4)2 phase is created, whereas at 935 °C for 24 h the formation of semiconducting WO3 crystallites of an average size of 80 nm enhances the conductivity to the highest value of 1.64 × 10−4 (Ω cm)–1 at 30 °C. The course of the crystallization and its impact on this exceptionally high electronic transport of binary tungsten phosphate glass-ceramics has been discussed in detail. Since such highly electronically conductive WO3-based glass-ceramics have a great potential as cathode/anode materials in solid state batteries and as electrocatalysts in fuel cells, it is of interest to provide a novel insight into the improvement of their electrical properties. Full article
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Article
Dynamics and Pretransitional Effects in C60 Fullerene Nanoparticles and Liquid Crystalline Dodecylcyanobiphenyl (12CB) Hybrid System
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(12), 2343; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10122343 - 26 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 478
Abstract
The report shows the strong impact of fullerene C60 nanoparticles on phase transitions and complex dynamics of rod-like liquid crystal dodecylcyanobiphenyl (12CB), within the limit of small concentrations. Studies were carried out using broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS) via the analysis of temperature [...] Read more.
The report shows the strong impact of fullerene C60 nanoparticles on phase transitions and complex dynamics of rod-like liquid crystal dodecylcyanobiphenyl (12CB), within the limit of small concentrations. Studies were carried out using broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS) via the analysis of temperature dependences of the dielectric constant, the maximum of the primary loss curve, and relaxation times. They revealed a strong impact of nanoparticles, leading to a ~20% change of dielectric constant even at x = 0.05% of C60 fullerene. The application of the derivative-based and distortion-sensitive analysis showed that pretransitional effects dominate in the isotropic liquid phase up to 65 K above the clearing temperature and in the whole Smectic A mesophase. The impact of nanoparticles on the pretransitional anomaly appearance is notable for the smectic–solid phase transition. The fragility-based analysis of relaxation times revealed the universal pattern of its temperature changes, associated with scaling via the “mixed” (“activated” and “critical”) relation. Phase behavior and dynamics of tested systems are discussed within the extended Landau–de Gennes–Ginzburg mesoscopic approach. Full article
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Article
Non-Linear Optical Properties of Er3+–Yb3+-Doped NaGdF4 Nanostructured Glass–Ceramics
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(7), 1425; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10071425 - 21 Jul 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1046
Abstract
Transparent oxyfluoride glass–ceramics containing NaGdF4 nanocrystals were prepared by melt-quenching and doped with Er3+ (0.5 mol%) and different amounts of Yb3+ (0–2 mol%). The selected dopant concentration the crystallization thermal treatments were chosen to obtain the most efficient visible up-conversion [...] Read more.
Transparent oxyfluoride glass–ceramics containing NaGdF4 nanocrystals were prepared by melt-quenching and doped with Er3+ (0.5 mol%) and different amounts of Yb3+ (0–2 mol%). The selected dopant concentration the crystallization thermal treatments were chosen to obtain the most efficient visible up-conversion emissions, together with near infrared emissions. The crystal size increased with dopant content and treatment time. NaGdF4 NCs with a size ranging 9–30 nm were obtained after heat treatments at Tg + 20–80 °C as confirmed by X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis shows the incorporation of rare earth ions into the NaGdF4 nanocrystals. Near-infrared emission spectra, together with the up-conversion emissions were measured. The optical characterization of the glass–ceramics clearly shows that Er3+ and Yb3+ ions are incorporated in the crystalline phase. Moreover, visible up-conversion emissions could be tuned by controlling the nanocrystals size through appropriated heat treatment, making possible a correlation between structural and optical properties. Full article
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Review

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Review
Towards Higher Electric Conductivity and Wider Phase Stability Range via Nanostructured Glass-Ceramics Processing
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(5), 1321; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11051321 - 17 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 630
Abstract
This review article presents recent studies on nanostructured glass-ceramic materials with substantially improved electrical (ionic or electronic) conductivity or with an extended temperature stability range of highly conducting high-temperature crystalline phases. Such materials were synthesized by the thermal nanocrystallization of selected electrically conducting [...] Read more.
This review article presents recent studies on nanostructured glass-ceramic materials with substantially improved electrical (ionic or electronic) conductivity or with an extended temperature stability range of highly conducting high-temperature crystalline phases. Such materials were synthesized by the thermal nanocrystallization of selected electrically conducting oxide glasses. Various nanostructured systems have been described, including glass-ceramics based on ion conductive glasses (silver iodate and bismuth oxide ones) and electronic conductive glasses (vanadate-phosphate and olivine-like ones). Most systems under consideration have been studied with the practical aim of using them as electrode or solid electrolyte materials for rechargeable Li-ion, Na-ion, all-solid batteries, or solid oxide fuel cells. It has been shown that the conductivity enhancement of glass-ceramics is closely correlated with their dual microstructure, consisting of nanocrystallites (5–100 nm) confined in the glassy matrix. The disordered interfacial regions in those materials form “easy conduction” paths. It has also been shown that the glassy matrices may be a suitable environment for phases, which in bulk form are stable at high temperatures, and may exist when confined in nanograins embedded in the glassy matrix even at room temperature. Many complementary experimental techniques probing the electrical conductivity, long- and short-range structure, microstructure at the nanometer scale, or thermal transitions have been used to characterize the glass-ceramic systems under consideration. Their results have helped to explain the correlations between the microstructure and the properties of these systems. Full article
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Review
A Guided Walk through the World of Mesoporous Bioactive Glasses (MBGs): Fundamentals, Processing, and Applications
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(12), 2571; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10122571 - 21 Dec 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 990
Abstract
Bioactive glasses (BGs) are traditionally known to be able to bond to living bone and stimulate bone regeneration. The production of such materials in a mesoporous form allowed scientists to dramatically expand the versatility of oxide-based glass systems as well as their applications [...] Read more.
Bioactive glasses (BGs) are traditionally known to be able to bond to living bone and stimulate bone regeneration. The production of such materials in a mesoporous form allowed scientists to dramatically expand the versatility of oxide-based glass systems as well as their applications in biomedicine. These nanostructured materials, called mesoporous bioactive glasses (MBGs), not only exhibit an ultrafast mineralization rate but can be used as vehicles for the sustained delivery of drugs, which are hosted inside the mesopores, and therapeutic ions, which are released during material dissolution in contact with biological fluids. This review paper summarizes the main strategies for the preparation of MBGs, as well as their properties and applications in the biomedical field, with an emphasis on the methodological aspects and the promise of hierarchical systems with multiscale porosity. Full article
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