Nanomaterials for Catalytic Pollutant Destruction

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy and Catalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2023) | Viewed by 5643

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Materials and Energy, School of Chemical Sciences & Technology, Yunnan Institute of Frontier Technologies in Water Treatment, National Center for International Research on Photoelectric and Energy Materials, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091, China
Interests: catalysis (photocatalysis); synthesis of fine chemicals; nanomaterials; water treatment chemistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650500, China
Interests: catalytic oxidation of exhaust gas; catalysis of gaseous pollutants; carbon capture; catalytic conversion

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Environmental pollution caused by organic pollutants in water, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and other toxins have received increasing attention. Environmental catalysis is increasingly used to eliminate these pollutants. Nanotechnology has driven scientific advances in catalytic materials and processes over the past few decades. Nanoscale materials play important roles in the catalytic degradation of a great variety of pollutants. The practical significance of the abovementioned aspects has encouraged the edition of this Special Issue of Nanomaterials to focus on the recent advances in “Nanomaterials for Catalytic Pollutant Destruction”. This Special Issue is primed as the multidisciplinary study of some of the currently known and heterogeneous catalyst-based environmental remediation, which is essential in attaining sustainability in water and gas resource management. Potential topics include, but are not limited to: i) Advancements in heterogeneous catalyst-based environmental remediation; ii) New methods, such as the biotemplate method for synthesis of heterogeneous environmental catalysts; iii) Heterogeneous catalysts for wastewater treatment; iv) Heterogeneous catalysts for gas pollutant destruction; and v) Challenges with the heterogeneous catalyst-based environmental remediation.

Prof. Dr. Jiaqiang Wang
Prof. Dr. Qiulin Zhang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • heterogenous catalysts
  • photocatalysts
  • wastewater and gases pollutants treatment
  • biotemplates

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

17 pages, 2206 KiB  
Article
Plant Photocatalysts: Photoinduced Oxidation and Reduction Abilities of Plant Leaf Ashes under Solar Light
by Xiaoqian Ma, Jiao He, Yu Liu, Xiaoli Bai, Junyang Leng, Yi Zhao, Daomei Chen and Jiaqiang Wang
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(15), 2260; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13152260 - 6 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1509
Abstract
Plant leaf ashes were obtained via the high temperature calcination of the leaves of various plants, such as sugarcane, couchgrass, bracteata, garlic sprout, and the yellowish leek. Although the photosynthesis systems in plant leaves cannot exist after calcination, minerals in these ashes were [...] Read more.
Plant leaf ashes were obtained via the high temperature calcination of the leaves of various plants, such as sugarcane, couchgrass, bracteata, garlic sprout, and the yellowish leek. Although the photosynthesis systems in plant leaves cannot exist after calcination, minerals in these ashes were found to exhibit photochemical activities. The samples showed solar light photocatalytic oxidation activities sufficient to degrade methylene blue dye. They were also shown to possess intrinsic dehydrogenase-like activities in reducing the colorless electron acceptor 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride to a red formazan precipitate under solar light irradiation. The possible reasons behind these two unreported phenomena were also investigated. These ashes were characterized using a combination of physicochemical techniques. Moreover, our findings exemplify how the soluble and insoluble minerals in plant leaf ashes can be synergistically designed to yield next-generation photocatalysts. It may also lead to advances in artificial photosynthesis and photocatalytic dehydrogenase. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Catalytic Pollutant Destruction)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 2532 KiB  
Article
Formaldehyde Oxidation of Ce0.8Zr0.2O2 Nanocatalysts for Room Temperature: Kinetics and Effect of pH Value
by Zonglin Yang, Gaoyuan Qin, Ruijiu Tang, Lijuan Jia, Fang Wang and Tiancheng Liu
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(14), 2074; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13142074 - 14 Jul 2023
Viewed by 759
Abstract
Ce0.8Zr0.2O2 catalysts were prepared via the co-precipitation method under different pH conditions. The catalysts were characterized via TEM, XRD, XPS, BET, Raman, and FTIR. The oxidation performance of formaldehyde was tested. Precipitation pH affects the physicochemical properties and [...] Read more.
Ce0.8Zr0.2O2 catalysts were prepared via the co-precipitation method under different pH conditions. The catalysts were characterized via TEM, XRD, XPS, BET, Raman, and FTIR. The oxidation performance of formaldehyde was tested. Precipitation pH affects the physicochemical properties and performance of the Ce0.8Zr0.2O2 catalyst. By controlling the precipitation pH at 10.5, the Ce0.8Zr0.2O2 catalyst with the largest specific surface area, the smallest grain size with the best formaldehyde removal rate (98.85%), abundant oxygen vacancies, and the best oxidation performance were obtained. Meanwhile, the kinetic parameters of the catalyst were experimentally investigated and the calculated activation energy was 12.6 kJ/mol and the number of reaction steps was 1.4 and 1.2. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Catalytic Pollutant Destruction)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

16 pages, 5325 KiB  
Article
Weak Metal–Support Interaction over CuO/TiO2 Catalyst Governed Low-Temperature Toluene Oxidation
by Meilin Zou, Mingyue Wang, Jingge Wang, Danrui Zhu, Jiaying Liu, Junwei Wang, Qingchao Xiao and Jianjun Chen
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(12), 1859; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13121859 - 14 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1147
Abstract
Regulating the metal–support interaction is essential for obtaining highly efficient catalysts for the catalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In this work, CuO-TiO2(coll) and CuO/TiO2(imp) with different metal–support interactions were prepared via colloidal and impregnation methods, respectively. The [...] Read more.
Regulating the metal–support interaction is essential for obtaining highly efficient catalysts for the catalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In this work, CuO-TiO2(coll) and CuO/TiO2(imp) with different metal–support interactions were prepared via colloidal and impregnation methods, respectively. The results demonstrated that CuO/TiO2(imp) has higher low-temperature catalytic activity, with a 50% removal of toluene at 170 °C compared to CuO-TiO2(coll). Additionally, the normalized reaction rate (6.4 × 10−6 mol·g−1·s−1) at 160 °C over CuO/TiO2(imp) was almost four-fold higher than that over CuO-TiO2(coll) (1.5 × 10−6 mol·g−1·s−1), and the apparent activation energy value (27.9 ± 2.9 kJ·mol−1) was lower. Systematic structure and surface analysis results disclosed that abundant Cu2+ active species and numerous small CuO particles were presented over CuO/TiO2(imp). Owing to the weak interaction of CuO and TiO2 in this optimized catalyst, the concentration of reducible oxygen species associated with the superior redox property could be enhanced, thus significantly contributing to its low-temperature catalytic activity for toluene oxidation. This work is helpful in exploring the influence of metal–support interaction on the catalytic oxidation of VOCs and developing low-temperature catalysts for VOCs catalytic oxidation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Catalytic Pollutant Destruction)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

33 pages, 15028 KiB  
Review
Recent Advances in Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron (nZVI)-Based Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs): Applications, Mechanisms, and Future Prospects
by Mingyue Liu, Yuyuan Ye, Linli Xu, Ting Gao, Aiguo Zhong and Zhenjun Song
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(21), 2830; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13212830 - 25 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1860
Abstract
The fast rise of organic pollution has posed severe health risks to human beings and toxic issues to ecosystems. Proper disposal toward these organic contaminants is significant to maintain a green and sustainable development. Among various techniques for environmental remediation, advanced oxidation processes [...] Read more.
The fast rise of organic pollution has posed severe health risks to human beings and toxic issues to ecosystems. Proper disposal toward these organic contaminants is significant to maintain a green and sustainable development. Among various techniques for environmental remediation, advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) can non-selectively oxidize and mineralize organic contaminants into CO2, H2O, and inorganic salts using free radicals that are generated from the activation of oxidants, such as persulfate, H2O2, O2, peracetic acid, periodate, percarbonate, etc., while the activation of oxidants using catalysts via Fenton-type reactions is crucial for the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), i.e., •OH, •SO4, •O2, •O3CCH3, •O2CCH3, •IO3, •CO3, and 1O2. Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI), with a core of Fe0 that performs a sustained activation effect in AOPs by gradually releasing ferrous ions, has been demonstrated as a cost-effective, high reactivity, easy recovery, easy recycling, and environmentally friendly heterogeneous catalyst of AOPs. The combination of nZVI and AOPs, providing an appropriate way for the complete degradation of organic pollutants via indiscriminate oxidation of ROS, is emerging as an important technique for environmental remediation and has received considerable attention in the last decade. The following review comprises a short survey of the most recent reports in the applications of nZVI participating AOPs, their mechanisms, and future prospects. It contains six sections, an introduction into the theme, applications of persulfate, hydrogen peroxide, oxygen, and other oxidants-based AOPs catalyzed with nZVI, and conclusions about the reported research with perspectives for future developments. Elucidation of the applications and mechanisms of nZVI-based AOPs with various oxidants may not only pave the way to more affordable AOP protocols, but may also promote exploration and fabrication of more effective and sustainable nZVI materials applicable in practical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Catalytic Pollutant Destruction)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop