Special Issue "Nanomaterials: 10th Anniversary"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Shirley Chiang
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Guest Editor
Department of Physics, University of California Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616-5270, USA
Interests: nanotechnology; nanomaterials; surface microscopy; surface physics and chemistry; scanning probe microscopy (STM, AFM, ultrahigh vacuum); low energy electron microscopy (LEEM); x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS); metals on semiconductors; graphene, adsorption on surfaces; surface phase transitions
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are celebrating the 10th anniversary of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991; CODEN: NANOKO) in 2020. On behalf of the former Editor in Chief, Prof. Dr. Thomas Nann, members of the Editorial Office, and members of the Editorial Board, I want to take the opportunity to thank our authors and reviewers for their valuable contributions that have made Nanomaterials a successful and respected journal in the field. I am very happy to report that the journal now has five thriving sections, each headed by an eminent Section Editor-in-Chief. To highlight this anniversary, I will be editing a Special Issue of long reviews that will gather various topics related to nanomaterials. Any topics related to the scope of the journal are welcome. Below I have listed the titles of the five sections of the journal, together with the names of the Section Editors-in-Chief, as a reminder of the many topics covered by this journal. Additional articles are being solicited for Special Issues in the sections.

  • Nanocomposite Thin Films and 2D Materials (Prof. Dr. Jordi Sort)
  • Biology and Medicines (Prof. Eleonore Fröhlich)
  • Nanophotonics: Characterization, Modeling, and Nanodevices (Prof. Paul F. McMillan)
  • Synthesis, Interfaces, and Nanostructures (Prof. Paolo M. Scrimin)
  • Energy and Catalysis (Prof. Nikolaos Dimitratos)

Additional information about the aims and scopes of the journal are available at https://www.mdpi.com/journal/nanomaterials/about. The scope of this Special Issue is broad to reflect the diversity of the original research covered by Nanomaterials (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/nanomaterials).

I warmly invite the Nanomaterials community to submit review articles to this Special Issue, which will provide a comprehensive survey of many of the topics in our field.

Prof. Dr. Shirley Chiang
Guest Editor text

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (14 papers)

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Research

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Article
Carbon Fiber—Silica Aerogel Composite with Enhanced Structural and Mechanical Properties Based on Water Glass and Ambient Pressure Drying
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(2), 258; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11020258 - 20 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 464
Abstract
The article presents the synthesis of silica aerogel from a much cheaper precursor of water glass that was reinforced with short pitch carbon fiber by way of ambient pressure drying. Before being added to the silica gel, the carbon fibers were surface modified [...] Read more.
The article presents the synthesis of silica aerogel from a much cheaper precursor of water glass that was reinforced with short pitch carbon fiber by way of ambient pressure drying. Before being added to the silica gel, the carbon fibers were surface modified to increase adhesion at the interfacial border. We were able to obtain stable structures of the composite with the amount of fibers above 10% by volume. The presence of fibers in the silica matrix resulted in lower synthesis time of the composite, improved adhesion of fibers to the aerogel nanostructure, and increased mechanical and structural parameters. An additional effect of the presence of fibers in excess of 10% by volume was a new function of the nanocomposite—the ability to conduct electric current. The most optimal parameters of the composite, however, were obtained for silica aerogel reinforced with 10 vol.% of carbon fibers. This material indicated relatively low density and good physical parameters. The paper also analyzes the results on the synthesis of fiber-reinforced silica aerogels that have appeared in recent years and compares these to the results gained in presented work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials: 10th Anniversary)
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Article
Magneto-Transport Properties of Co–Cu Thin Films Obtained by Co-Sputtering and Sputter Gas Aggregation
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(1), 134; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11010134 - 08 Jan 2021
Viewed by 361
Abstract
Cu100−xCox thin films have been obtained by sputtering (x = 3, 9) and sputter gas aggregation (x = 2.5, 7.5) and subsequent annealing at 400 °C for 1 h. We have studied their structural, magnetic, and magnetotransport properties, both for [...] Read more.
Cu100−xCox thin films have been obtained by sputtering (x = 3, 9) and sputter gas aggregation (x = 2.5, 7.5) and subsequent annealing at 400 °C for 1 h. We have studied their structural, magnetic, and magnetotransport properties, both for the as-deposited and annealed samples, confirming the important role of the fabrication method in the properties. The magnetic measurements and the fitting of the hysteresis loops evidence that as-deposited samples consist of superparamagnetic (SPM) and/or ferromagnetic clusters, but in the samples obtained by gas aggregation the clusters are greater (with ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature) whereas in the samples obtained by sputtering, the clusters are smaller and there are also diluted Co atoms in the Cu matrix. The annealing affects negligibly the samples obtained by gas aggregation, but the ones obtained by sputtering are more affected, appearing greater clusters. This behavior is also reflected in the magnetoresistance (MR) measurements of the samples, with different shapes of the MR curves depending on the preparation method: more lineal in the whole range for sputtering, saturation at low fields (about 10 kOe) for gas aggregation. Finally, a Kondo-like minimum in the resistance versus temperature is found in the samples obtained by sputtering, affected by the magnetic field and the annealing. The observed Kondo-like behavior and the influence of annealing on a Kondo-like minimum in sputtered thin films have been attributed to the presence of diluted Co atoms in the Cu matrix and the Co precipitations from the Co–Cu solid solution upon annealing respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials: 10th Anniversary)
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Article
Nanostructured Polyelectrolyte Complexes Based on Water-Soluble Thiacalix[4]Arene and Pillar[5]Arene: Self-Assembly in Micelleplexes and Polyplexes at Packaging DNA
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(4), 777; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10040777 - 17 Apr 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 938
Abstract
Controlling the self-assembly of polyfunctional compounds in interpolyelectrolyte aggregates is an extremely challenging task. The use of macrocyclic compounds offers new opportunities in design of a new generation of mixed nanoparticles. This approach allows creating aggregates with multivalent molecular recognition, improved binding efficiency [...] Read more.
Controlling the self-assembly of polyfunctional compounds in interpolyelectrolyte aggregates is an extremely challenging task. The use of macrocyclic compounds offers new opportunities in design of a new generation of mixed nanoparticles. This approach allows creating aggregates with multivalent molecular recognition, improved binding efficiency and selectivity. In this paper, we reported a straightforward approach to the synthesis of interpolyelectrolytes by co-assembling of the thiacalix[4]arene with four negatively charged functional groups on the one side of macrocycle, and pillar[5]arene with 10 ammonium groups located on both sides. Nanostructured polyelectrolyte complexes show effective packaging of high-molecular DNA from calf thymus. The interaction of co-interpolyelectrolytes with the DNA is completely different from the interaction of the pillar[5]arene with the DNA. Two different complexes with DNA, i.e., micelleplex- and polyplex-type, were formed. The DNA in both cases preserved its secondary structure in native B form without distorting helicity. The presented approach provides important advantage for the design of effective biomolecular gene delivery systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials: 10th Anniversary)
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Review

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Review
Applications of Carbon Dots in Optoelectronics
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(2), 364; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11020364 - 01 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 846
Abstract
Carbon dots (CDs) are an attractive class of nanomaterials due to the ease of their synthesis, biocompatibility, and superior optical properties. The electronic structure of CDs and hence their optical transitions can be controlled and tuned over a wide spectral range via the [...] Read more.
Carbon dots (CDs) are an attractive class of nanomaterials due to the ease of their synthesis, biocompatibility, and superior optical properties. The electronic structure of CDs and hence their optical transitions can be controlled and tuned over a wide spectral range via the choice of precursors, adjustment of the synthetic conditions, and post-synthetic treatment. We summarize recent progress in the synthesis of CDs emitting in different colors in terms of morphology and optical properties of the resulting nanoparticles, with a focus on the synthetic approaches allowing to shift their emission to longer wavelengths. We further consider formation of CD-based composite materials, and review approaches used to prevent aggregation and self-quenching of their emission. We then provide examples of applications of CDs in optoelectronic devices, such as solar cells and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with a focus on white LEDs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials: 10th Anniversary)
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Review
Microfluidic Synthesis of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(11), 2113; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10112113 - 23 Oct 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 665
Abstract
Research efforts into the production and application of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in recent decades have shown IONPs to be promising for a range of biomedical applications. Many synthesis techniques have been developed to produce high-quality IONPs that are safe for in vivo [...] Read more.
Research efforts into the production and application of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in recent decades have shown IONPs to be promising for a range of biomedical applications. Many synthesis techniques have been developed to produce high-quality IONPs that are safe for in vivo environments while also being able to perform useful biological functions. Among them, coprecipitation is the most commonly used method but has several limitations such as polydisperse IONPs, long synthesis times, and batch-to-batch variations. Recent efforts at addressing these limitations have led to the development of microfluidic devices that can make IONPs of much-improved quality. Here, we review recent advances in the development of microfluidic devices for the synthesis of IONPs by coprecipitation. We discuss the main architectures used in microfluidic device design and highlight the most prominent manufacturing methods and materials used to construct these microfluidic devices. Finally, we discuss the benefits that microfluidics can offer to the coprecipitation synthesis process including the ability to better control various synthesis parameters and produce IONPs with high production rates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials: 10th Anniversary)
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Review
The Emerging Role of Cold Atmospheric Plasma in Implantology: A Review of the Literature
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(8), 1505; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10081505 - 31 Jul 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1341
Abstract
In recent years, cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) technologies have received increasing attention in the field of biomedical applications. The aim of this article is to review the currently available literature to provide an overview of the scientific principles of CAP application, its features, [...] Read more.
In recent years, cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) technologies have received increasing attention in the field of biomedical applications. The aim of this article is to review the currently available literature to provide an overview of the scientific principles of CAP application, its features, functions, and its applications in systemic and oral diseases, with a specific focus on its potential in implantology. In this narrative review, PubMed, Medline, and Scopus databases were searched using key words like “cold atmospheric plasma”, “argon plasma”, “helium plasma”, “air plasma”, “dental implants”, “implantology”, “peri-implantitis”, “decontamination”. In vitro studies demonstrated CAP’s potential to enhance surface colonization and osteoblast activity and to accelerate mineralization, as well as to determine a clean surface with cell growth comparable to the sterile control on both titanium and zirconia surfaces. The effect of CAP on biofilm removal was revealed in comparative studies to the currently available decontamination modalities (laser, air abrasion, and chlorhexidine). The combination of mechanical treatments and CAP resulted in synergistic antimicrobial effects and surface improvement, indicating that it may play a central role in surface “rejuvenation” and offer a novel approach for the treatment of peri-implantitis. It is noteworthy that the CAP conditioning of implant surfaces leads to an improvement in osseointegration in in vivo animal studies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review of the literature providing a summary of the current state of the art of this emerging field in implantology and it could represent a point of reference for basic researchers and clinicians interested in approaching and testing new technologies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials: 10th Anniversary)
Review
Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Nanoplatforms for Colorectal Cancer Therapy
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(7), 1424; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10071424 - 21 Jul 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1148
Abstract
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a prevalent disease worldwide, and patients at late stages of CRC often suffer from a high mortality rate after surgery. Adjuvant chemotherapeutics (ACs) have been extensively developed to improve the survival rate of such patients, but conventionally formulated ACs [...] Read more.
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a prevalent disease worldwide, and patients at late stages of CRC often suffer from a high mortality rate after surgery. Adjuvant chemotherapeutics (ACs) have been extensively developed to improve the survival rate of such patients, but conventionally formulated ACs inevitably distribute toxic chemotherapeutic drugs to healthy organs and thus often trigger severe side effects. CRC cells may also develop drug resistance following repeat dosing of conventional ACs, limiting their effectiveness. Given these limitations, researchers have sought to use targeted drug delivery systems (DDSs), specifically the nanotechnology-based DDSs, to deliver the ACs. As lipid-based nanoplatforms have shown the potential to improve the efficacy and safety of various cytotoxic drugs (such as paclitaxel and vincristine) in the clinical treatment of gastric cancer and leukemia, the preclinical progress of lipid-based nanoplatforms has attracted increasing interest. The lipid-based nanoplatforms might be the most promising DDSs to succeed in entering a clinical trial for CRC treatment. This review will briefly examine the history of preclinical research on lipid-based nanoplatforms, summarize the current progress, and discuss the challenges and prospects of using such approaches in the treatment of CRC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials: 10th Anniversary)
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Review
Advancements in Plant and Microbe-Based Synthesis of Metallic Nanoparticles and Their Antimicrobial Activity against Plant Pathogens
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(6), 1146; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10061146 - 11 Jun 2020
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 2147
Abstract
A large number of metallic nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by using different plant extracts and microbes including bacteria, fungi viruses and microalgae. Some of these metallic nanoparticles showed strong antimicrobial activities against phytopathogens. Here, we summarized these green-synthesized nanoparticles from plants and [...] Read more.
A large number of metallic nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by using different plant extracts and microbes including bacteria, fungi viruses and microalgae. Some of these metallic nanoparticles showed strong antimicrobial activities against phytopathogens. Here, we summarized these green-synthesized nanoparticles from plants and microbes and their applications in the control of plant pathogens. We also discussed the potential deleterious effects of the metallic nanoparticles on plants and beneficial microbial communities associated with plants. Overall, this review calls for attention regarding the use of green-synthesized metallic nanoparticles in controlling plant diseases and clarification of the risks to plants, plant-associated microbial communities, and environments before using them in agriculture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials: 10th Anniversary)
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Review
Engineering Metal–Organic Frameworks (MOFs) for Controlled Delivery of Physiological Gaseous Transmitters
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(6), 1134; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10061134 - 08 Jun 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1048
Abstract
Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) comprising metal ions or clusters coordinated to organic ligands have become a class of emerging materials in the field of biomedical research due to their bespoke compositions, highly porous nanostructures, large surface areas, good biocompatibility, etc. So far, many MOFs [...] Read more.
Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) comprising metal ions or clusters coordinated to organic ligands have become a class of emerging materials in the field of biomedical research due to their bespoke compositions, highly porous nanostructures, large surface areas, good biocompatibility, etc. So far, many MOFs have been developed for imaging and therapy purposes. The unique porous nanostructures render it possible to adsorb and store various substances, especially for gaseous molecules, which is rather challenging for other types of delivery vectors. In this review, we mainly focus on the recent development of MOFs for controlled release of three gaseous transmitters, namely, nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO), and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Although these gaseous molecules have been known as air pollutants for a long time, much evidence has been uncovered regarding their important physiological functions as signaling molecules. These signaling molecules could be either physically absorbed onto or covalently linked to MOFs, allowing for the release of loaded signaling molecules in a spontaneous or controlled manner. We highlight the designing concept by selective examples and display their potential applications in many fields such as cancer therapy, wound healing, and anti-inflammation. We hope more effort could be devoted to this emerging fields to develop signaling molecule-releasing MOFs with practical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials: 10th Anniversary)
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Review
Emerging Nano/Micro-Structured Degradable Polymeric Meshes for Pelvic Floor Reconstruction
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(6), 1120; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10061120 - 05 Jun 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1746
Abstract
Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a hidden women’s health disorder that impacts 1 in 4 women across all age groups. Surgical intervention has been the only treatment option, often involving non-degradable meshes, with variable results. However, recent reports have highlighted the adverse effects [...] Read more.
Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a hidden women’s health disorder that impacts 1 in 4 women across all age groups. Surgical intervention has been the only treatment option, often involving non-degradable meshes, with variable results. However, recent reports have highlighted the adverse effects of meshes in the long term, which involve unacceptable rates of erosion, chronic infection and severe pain related to mesh shrinkage. Therefore, there is an urgent unmet need to fabricate of new class of biocompatible meshes for the treatment of POP. This review focuses on the causes for the downfall of commercial meshes, and discusses the use of emerging technologies such as electrospinning and 3D printing to design new meshes. Furthermore, we discuss the impact and advantage of nano-/microstructured alternative meshes over commercial meshes with respect to their tissue integration performance. Considering the key challenges of current meshes, we discuss the potential of cell-based tissue engineering strategies to augment the new class of meshes to improve biocompatibility and immunomodulation. Finally, this review highlights the future direction in designing the new class of mesh to overcome the hurdles of foreign body rejection faced by the traditional meshes, in order to have safe and effective treatment for women in the long term. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials: 10th Anniversary)
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Review
Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology-Associated Innovations against Viral Infections with a Focus on Coronaviruses
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(6), 1072; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10061072 - 31 May 2020
Cited by 33 | Viewed by 3673
Abstract
Viral infections have recently emerged not only as a health threat to people but rapidly became the cause of universal fatality on a large scale. Nanomaterials comprising functionalized nanoparticles (NPs) and quantum dots and nanotechnology-associated innovative detection methods, vaccine design, and nanodrug production [...] Read more.
Viral infections have recently emerged not only as a health threat to people but rapidly became the cause of universal fatality on a large scale. Nanomaterials comprising functionalized nanoparticles (NPs) and quantum dots and nanotechnology-associated innovative detection methods, vaccine design, and nanodrug production have shown immense promise for interfacing with pathogenic viruses and restricting their entrance into cells. These viruses have been scrutinized using rapid diagnostic detection and therapeutic interventional options against the caused infections including vaccine development for prevention and control. Coronaviruses, namely SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and SARS-CoV-2, have endangered human life, and the COVID-19 (caused by SARS-CoV-2) outbreak has become a perilous challenge to public health globally with huge accompanying morbidity rates. Thus, it is imperative to expedite the drug and vaccine development efforts that would help mitigate this pandemic. In this regard, smart and innovative nano-based technologies and approaches encompassing applications of green nanomedicine, bio-inspired methods, multifunctional bioengineered nanomaterials, and biomimetic drug delivery systems/carriers can help resolve the critical issues regarding detection, prevention, and treatment of viral infections. This perspective review expounds recent nanoscience advancements for the detection and treatment of viral infections with focus on coronaviruses and encompasses nano-based formulations and delivery platforms, nanovaccines, and promising methods for clinical diagnosis, especially regarding SARS-CoV-2. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials: 10th Anniversary)
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Review
Nanomaterials in Cosmetics: Recent Updates
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(5), 979; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10050979 - 20 May 2020
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 2588
Abstract
This review paper collects the recent updates regarding the use of nanomaterials in cosmetics. Special focus is given to the applications of nanomaterials in the cosmetic industry, their unique features, as well as the advantages of nanoscale ingredients compared to non-nanoscale products. The [...] Read more.
This review paper collects the recent updates regarding the use of nanomaterials in cosmetics. Special focus is given to the applications of nanomaterials in the cosmetic industry, their unique features, as well as the advantages of nanoscale ingredients compared to non-nanoscale products. The state-of-the-art practices for physicochemical and toxicological characterization of nanomaterials are also reviewed. Moreover, special focus is given to the current regulations and safety assessments that are currently in place regarding the use of nanomaterials in cosmetics—the new 2019 European guidance for the safety assessment of nanomaterials in cosmetics, together with the new proposed methodologies for the toxicity evaluation of nanomaterials. Concerns over health risks have limited the further incorporation of nanomaterials in cosmetics, and since new nanomaterials may be used in the future by the cosmetic industry, a detailed characterization and risk assessment are needed to fulfill the standard safety requirements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials: 10th Anniversary)
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Review
Electrospun Nanocomposites Containing Cellulose and Its Derivatives Modified with Specialized Biomolecules for an Enhanced Wound Healing
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(3), 557; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10030557 - 19 Mar 2020
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 1814
Abstract
Wound healing requires careful, directed, and effective therapies to prevent infections and accelerate tissue regeneration. In light of these demands, active biomolecules with antibacterial properties and/or healing capacities have been functionalized onto nanostructured polymeric dressings and their synergistic effect examined. In this work, [...] Read more.
Wound healing requires careful, directed, and effective therapies to prevent infections and accelerate tissue regeneration. In light of these demands, active biomolecules with antibacterial properties and/or healing capacities have been functionalized onto nanostructured polymeric dressings and their synergistic effect examined. In this work, various antibiotics, nanoparticles, and natural extract-derived products that were used in association with electrospun nanocomposites containing cellulose, cellulose acetate and different types of nanocellulose (cellulose nanocrystals, cellulose nanofibrils, and bacterial cellulose) have been reviewed. Renewable, natural-origin compounds are gaining more relevance each day as potential alternatives to synthetic materials, since the former undesirable footprints in biomedicine, the environment, and the ecosystems are reaching concerning levels. Therefore, cellulose and its derivatives have been the object of numerous biomedical studies, in which their biocompatibility, biodegradability, and, most importantly, sustainability and abundance, have been determinant. A complete overview of the recently produced cellulose-containing nanofibrous meshes for wound healing applications was provided. Moreover, the current challenges that are faced by cellulose acetate- and nanocellulose-containing wound dressing formulations, processed by electrospinning, were also enumerated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials: 10th Anniversary)
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Review
Functionalization of Gold Nanoparticles by Inorganic Entities
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(3), 548; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10030548 - 18 Mar 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1338
Abstract
The great affinity of gold surface for numerous electron-donating groups has largely contributed to the rapid development of functionalized gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs). In the last years, a new subclass of nanocomposite has emerged, based on the association of inorganic molecular entities (IME) with [...] Read more.
The great affinity of gold surface for numerous electron-donating groups has largely contributed to the rapid development of functionalized gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs). In the last years, a new subclass of nanocomposite has emerged, based on the association of inorganic molecular entities (IME) with Au-NPs. This highly extended and diversified subclass was promoted by the synergy between the intrinsic properties of the shell and the gold core. This review—divided into four main parts—focuses on an introductory section of the basic notions related to the stabilization of gold nanoparticles and defines in a second part the key role played by the functionalizing agent. Then, we present a wide range of inorganic molecular entities used to prepare these nanocomposites (NCs). In particular, we focus on four different types of inorganic systems, their topologies, and their current applications. Finally, the most recent applications are described before an overview of this new emerging field of research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials: 10th Anniversary)
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