Special Issue "Nanomaterials: 10th Anniversary"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Shirley Chiang
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Guest Editor
Department of Physics, University of California Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616-5270, USA
Interests: nanotechnology; nanomaterials; surface microscopy; surface physics and chemistry; scanning probe microscopy (STM, AFM, ultrahigh vacuum); low energy electron microscopy (LEEM); x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS); metals on semiconductors; graphene, adsorption on surfaces; surface phase transitions
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are celebrating the 10th anniversary of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991; CODEN: NANOKO) in 2020. On behalf of the former Editor in Chief, Prof. Dr. Thomas Nann, members of the Editorial Office, and members of the Editorial Board, I want to take the opportunity to thank our authors and reviewers for their valuable contributions that have made Nanomaterials a successful and respected journal in the field. I am very happy to report that the journal now has five thriving sections, each headed by an eminent Section Editor-in-Chief. To highlight this anniversary, I will be editing a Special Issue of long reviews that will gather various topics related to nanomaterials. Any topics related to the scope of the journal are welcome. Below I have listed the titles of the five sections of the journal, together with the names of the Section Editors-in-Chief, as a reminder of the many topics covered by this journal. Additional articles are being solicited for Special Issues in the sections.

  • Nanocomposite Thin Films and 2D Materials (Prof. Dr. Jordi Sort)
  • Biology and Medicines (Prof. Eleonore Fröhlich)
  • Nanophotonics: Characterization, Modeling, and Nanodevices (Prof. Paul F. McMillan)
  • Synthesis, Interfaces, and Nanostructures (Prof. Paolo M. Scrimin)
  • Energy and Catalysis (Prof. Nikolaos Dimitratos)

Additional information about the aims and scopes of the journal are available at https://www.mdpi.com/journal/nanomaterials/about. The scope of this Special Issue is broad to reflect the diversity of the original research covered by Nanomaterials (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/nanomaterials).

I warmly invite the Nanomaterials community to submit review articles to this Special Issue, which will provide a comprehensive survey of many of the topics in our field.

Prof. Dr. Shirley Chiang
Guest Editor text

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Nanostructured Polyelectrolyte Complexes Based on Water-Soluble Thiacalix[4]Arene and Pillar[5]Arene: Self-Assembly in Micelleplexes and Polyplexes at Packaging DNA
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(4), 777; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10040777 - 17 Apr 2020
Abstract
Controlling the self-assembly of polyfunctional compounds in interpolyelectrolyte aggregates is an extremely challenging task. The use of macrocyclic compounds offers new opportunities in design of a new generation of mixed nanoparticles. This approach allows creating aggregates with multivalent molecular recognition, improved binding efficiency [...] Read more.
Controlling the self-assembly of polyfunctional compounds in interpolyelectrolyte aggregates is an extremely challenging task. The use of macrocyclic compounds offers new opportunities in design of a new generation of mixed nanoparticles. This approach allows creating aggregates with multivalent molecular recognition, improved binding efficiency and selectivity. In this paper, we reported a straightforward approach to the synthesis of interpolyelectrolytes by co-assembling of the thiacalix[4]arene with four negatively charged functional groups on the one side of macrocycle, and pillar[5]arene with 10 ammonium groups located on both sides. Nanostructured polyelectrolyte complexes show effective packaging of high-molecular DNA from calf thymus. The interaction of co-interpolyelectrolytes with the DNA is completely different from the interaction of the pillar[5]arene with the DNA. Two different complexes with DNA, i.e., micelleplex- and polyplex-type, were formed. The DNA in both cases preserved its secondary structure in native B form without distorting helicity. The presented approach provides important advantage for the design of effective biomolecular gene delivery systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials: 10th Anniversary)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Nanomaterials in Cosmetics: Recent Updates
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(5), 979; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10050979 - 20 May 2020
Abstract
This review paper collects the recent updates regarding the use of nanomaterials in cosmetics. Special focus is given to the applications of nanomaterials in the cosmetic industry, their unique features, as well as the advantages of nanoscale ingredients compared to non-nanoscale products. The [...] Read more.
This review paper collects the recent updates regarding the use of nanomaterials in cosmetics. Special focus is given to the applications of nanomaterials in the cosmetic industry, their unique features, as well as the advantages of nanoscale ingredients compared to non-nanoscale products. The state-of-the-art practices for physicochemical and toxicological characterization of nanomaterials are also reviewed. Moreover, special focus is given to the current regulations and safety assessments that are currently in place regarding the use of nanomaterials in cosmetics—the new 2019 European guidance for the safety assessment of nanomaterials in cosmetics, together with the new proposed methodologies for the toxicity evaluation of nanomaterials. Concerns over health risks have limited the further incorporation of nanomaterials in cosmetics, and since new nanomaterials may be used in the future by the cosmetic industry, a detailed characterization and risk assessment are needed to fulfill the standard safety requirements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials: 10th Anniversary)
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Open AccessReview
Electrospun Nanocomposites Containing Cellulose and Its Derivatives Modified with Specialized Biomolecules for an Enhanced Wound Healing
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(3), 557; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10030557 - 19 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Wound healing requires careful, directed, and effective therapies to prevent infections and accelerate tissue regeneration. In light of these demands, active biomolecules with antibacterial properties and/or healing capacities have been functionalized onto nanostructured polymeric dressings and their synergistic effect examined. In this work, [...] Read more.
Wound healing requires careful, directed, and effective therapies to prevent infections and accelerate tissue regeneration. In light of these demands, active biomolecules with antibacterial properties and/or healing capacities have been functionalized onto nanostructured polymeric dressings and their synergistic effect examined. In this work, various antibiotics, nanoparticles, and natural extract-derived products that were used in association with electrospun nanocomposites containing cellulose, cellulose acetate and different types of nanocellulose (cellulose nanocrystals, cellulose nanofibrils, and bacterial cellulose) have been reviewed. Renewable, natural-origin compounds are gaining more relevance each day as potential alternatives to synthetic materials, since the former undesirable footprints in biomedicine, the environment, and the ecosystems are reaching concerning levels. Therefore, cellulose and its derivatives have been the object of numerous biomedical studies, in which their biocompatibility, biodegradability, and, most importantly, sustainability and abundance, have been determinant. A complete overview of the recently produced cellulose-containing nanofibrous meshes for wound healing applications was provided. Moreover, the current challenges that are faced by cellulose acetate- and nanocellulose-containing wound dressing formulations, processed by electrospinning, were also enumerated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials: 10th Anniversary)
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Open AccessReview
Functionalization of Gold Nanoparticles by Inorganic Entities
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(3), 548; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10030548 - 18 Mar 2020
Abstract
The great affinity of gold surface for numerous electron-donating groups has largely contributed to the rapid development of functionalized gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs). In the last years, a new subclass of nanocomposite has emerged, based on the association of inorganic molecular entities (IME) with [...] Read more.
The great affinity of gold surface for numerous electron-donating groups has largely contributed to the rapid development of functionalized gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs). In the last years, a new subclass of nanocomposite has emerged, based on the association of inorganic molecular entities (IME) with Au-NPs. This highly extended and diversified subclass was promoted by the synergy between the intrinsic properties of the shell and the gold core. This review—divided into four main parts—focuses on an introductory section of the basic notions related to the stabilization of gold nanoparticles and defines in a second part the key role played by the functionalizing agent. Then, we present a wide range of inorganic molecular entities used to prepare these nanocomposites (NCs). In particular, we focus on four different types of inorganic systems, their topologies, and their current applications. Finally, the most recent applications are described before an overview of this new emerging field of research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials: 10th Anniversary)
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