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Special Issue "Bioactive Compounds in Foods"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Rafael Guillén Bejarano
Website
Guest Editor
Phytochemicals and Food Quality Group, Inst. de la Grasa (CSIC), 41013 Seville, Spain
Interests: phytochemicals; food quality; saponins; complex carbohydrates
Dr. María Rocío Rodríguez Arcos
Website
Guest Editor
Instituto de la Grasa, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Pablo de Olavide Universitary Campus, Building 46, Carretera de Utrera Km 1, 41013 Seville, Spain
Interests: phytochemicals; circular economy; phenolics; food quality

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food bioactives are a group of various molecules that are distinct from nutrients though have biological activity that is beneficial for human and animal health when included in the diet. They may have a natural origin—such as those present in animals, plants, and microorganisms—or be synthetic. They can also occur as a component of a given food or be added as a supplement. Because of their many potential health benefits, food bioactives have become one of the hottest new areas of research in food and nutrition.

The amount and type of bioactives present in food depend on genetic (species, varieties, and breeds) as well as on environmental factors, such as cultivation or breeding conditions, time of collection, processing, and storage of the final food. Studying the best combination of these factors to optimize the bioactives content is, hence, a very relevant subject.

The preponderant agronomic practices in recent decades have led to a significant decrease in agrobiodiversity. According to the FAO, 75% of the world’s food is generated only from 12 plants and 5 animal species. This loss of agrobiodiversity has dramatically decreased the content and variety of bioactive compounds in our food. Consequently, the search for new bioactive compounds in so-called minor and under-utilized crops and livestock, as well as the study of their applications in the field of functional foods and nutraceuticals, deserve attention.

One of the fastest growing sectors in recent years within the food industry is the production of bioactives as either ingredients in functional foods or as nutraceuticals for human consumption. The development of better methods for the isolation and purification of bioactives from their respective sources—to improve their purity and quality as well as their sustainability—is a key subject.

Finally, studies of the efficacy and safety of food bioactives are necessary, along with those related to their interaction with the gut microbiota.

Dr. Rafael Guillén Bejarano
Dr. María Rocío Rodríguez Arcos
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioactive food ingredients
  • green extraction technologies
  • bioaccessibility and bioavailability
  • bioactivity
  • efficacy and safety of food ingredients

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Bioactive Compounds in Fermented Sausages Prepared from Beef and Fallow Deer Meat with Acid Whey Addition
Molecules 2020, 25(10), 2429; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25102429 - 22 May 2020
Abstract
The present study examined the effect of the type of meat (beef and fallow deer) and the addition of freeze-dried acid whey on nutritional values and the content of bioactive compounds (peptides, L-carnitine, glutathione, and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA)) in uncured fermented sausages. [...] Read more.
The present study examined the effect of the type of meat (beef and fallow deer) and the addition of freeze-dried acid whey on nutritional values and the content of bioactive compounds (peptides, L-carnitine, glutathione, and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA)) in uncured fermented sausages. The antioxidant properties of isolated peptides (ABTS, DPPH radical scavenging activity, and ferric-reducing antioxidant power) were also evaluated. The results showed that fallow deer sausages had higher peptide content than beef products. The addition of acid whey caused a decrease in the content of peptides, especially in fallow deer sausages. The glutathione content in beef sausages (22.91–25.28 mg 100 g−1 of sausage) was quite higher than that of fallow deer sausages (10.04–11.59 mg 100 g−1 of sausage). The obtained results showed a significantly higher content of CLA in beef sausages than in products from fallow deer meat. In conclusion, products prepared from fallow deer meat have generally higher nutritional value because of the content of peptides, their antioxidant properties, and the content of L-carnitine, while beef products have higher levels of CLA and glutathione. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds in Foods)
Open AccessArticle
Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) Alters Histone Acetylation and Methylation and Impacts Chromatin Architecture Profile in Human Endothelial Cells
Molecules 2020, 25(10), 2326; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25102326 - 16 May 2020
Abstract
Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the main green tea polyphenol, exerts a wide variety of biological actions. Epigenetically, the catechin has been classified as a DNMTs inhibitor, however, its impact on histone modifications and chromatin structure is still poorly understood. The purpose of this study [...] Read more.
Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the main green tea polyphenol, exerts a wide variety of biological actions. Epigenetically, the catechin has been classified as a DNMTs inhibitor, however, its impact on histone modifications and chromatin structure is still poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to find the impact of EGCG on the histone posttranslational modifications machinery and chromatin remodeling in human endothelial cells of both microvascular (HMEC-1) and vein (HUVECs) origin. We analyzed the methylation and acetylation status of histones (Western blotting), as well as assessed the activity (fluorometric assay kit) and gene expression (qPCR) of the enzymes playing a prominent role in shaping the human epigenome. The performed analyses showed that EGCG increases histone acetylation (H3K9/14ac, H3ac), and methylation of both active (H3K4me3) and repressive (H3K9me3) chromatin marks. We also found that the catechin acts as an HDAC inhibitor in cellular and cell-free models. Additionally, we observed that EGCG affects chromatin architecture by reducing the expression of heterochromatin binding proteins: HP1α, HP1γ. Our results indicate that EGCG promotes chromatin relaxation in human endothelial cells and presents a broad epigenetic potential affecting expression and activity of epigenome modulators including HDAC5 and 7, p300, CREBP, LSD1 or KMT2A. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds in Foods)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Shading on Development, Yield and Quality of Bastard Balm Herb (Melittis melissophyllum L.)
Molecules 2020, 25(9), 2142; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25092142 - 03 May 2020
Abstract
The aim of the study was to assess the effects of Melittis melissophyllum shading on its development and accumulation of phenolics. Their content (verbascoside, apiin, luteolin-7-O-glucoside, coumarin, 3,4-dihydroxycoumarin, o-coumaric acid 2-O-glucoside as well as o-coumaric, p-coumaric, [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to assess the effects of Melittis melissophyllum shading on its development and accumulation of phenolics. Their content (verbascoside, apiin, luteolin-7-O-glucoside, coumarin, 3,4-dihydroxycoumarin, o-coumaric acid 2-O-glucoside as well as o-coumaric, p-coumaric, chlorogenic, caffeic, ferulic and cichoric acid) was determined in the herb using HPLC-DAD. The results showed that the content of abovementioned flavonoids and phenolic acids was highest in plants grown under full sunlight. On the other hand, a higher content of coumarin was observed in shaded plants, especially after the seed-setting stage. A similar tendency was noted for the amount of chlorophyll a and b. The content of hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde, the activity of polyphenol oxidase and catalase and the antioxidant capacity of plant extracts (measured using DPPH, ABTS and FRAP assays) were found to be the highest in the plants grown in full sunlight. However, the plants grown in moderate (30%) shade were found to thrive best. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds in Foods)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Ozonation as a Method of Abiotic Elicitation Improving the Health-Promoting Properties of Plant Products—A Review
Molecules 2020, 25(10), 2416; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25102416 - 22 May 2020
Abstract
In this review, the primary objective was to systematize knowledge about the possibility of improving the health-promoting properties of raw plant products, defined as an increase in the content of bioactive compounds, by using ozone. The greatest attention has been paid to the [...] Read more.
In this review, the primary objective was to systematize knowledge about the possibility of improving the health-promoting properties of raw plant products, defined as an increase in the content of bioactive compounds, by using ozone. The greatest attention has been paid to the postharvest treatment of plant raw materials with ozone because of its widespread use. The effect of this treatment on the health-promoting properties depends on the following different factors: type and variety of the fruit or vegetable, form and method of ozone treatment, and dosage of ozone. It seems that ozone applied in the form of ozonated water works more gently than in gaseous form. Relatively high concentration and long contact time used simultaneously might result in increased oxidative stress which leads to the degradation of quality. The majority of the literature demonstrates the degradation of vitamin C and deterioration of color after treatment with ozone. Unfortunately, it is not clear if ozone can be used as an elicitor to improve the quality of the raw material. Most sources prove that the best results in increasing the content of bioactive components can be obtained by applying ozone at a relatively low concentration for a short time immediately after harvest. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds in Foods)

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Emodin-mediated Changes in the Gut Microbiota
Author: Bradley S. Ferguson
Affiliation: Department of Agriculture, Nutrition, & Veterinary Sciences, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada
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