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Special Issue "Advances towards Green Analytical Chemistry"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Analytical Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Verónica Pino
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Analytical Division, University of La Laguna, La Laguna, Spain
Interests: analytical sample preparation; novel materials; chromatography; ionic liquids and derivatives; metal-organic frameworks
Dr. Idaira Pacheco-Fernández

Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry (Analytical Chemistry Division), Universidad de la Laguna, Tenerife, Spain
Interests: analytical sample preparation; microextraction; ionic liquids; metal¬–organic frameworks, polymers; environemntal analysis, bioclinical analysis; food analysis; chromatography

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The incorporation of the Green Chemistry requirements within the analytical process has been highly pursued in recent years. In this sense, efforts have shifted towards the development of green analytical sample preparation methods and analytical separation techniques. The proposed strategies to improve the sustainability of analytical protocols are mainly based on the miniaturization and/or automation of the process, the reduction or even elimination of organic solvents and/or toxic reagents required in the procedure, and the design and incorporation of new solvents and sorbents with enhanced environmentally friendly characteristics.
This Special Issue aims to address recent advances in the development of greener tools applied in analytical methodologies, including improvements of the procedures and instrumentation, together with the incorporation of new materials. The use of already proposed sustainable technologies is also covered as long as they are applied for a specific challenging application as an alternative to conventional approaches.
We warmly invite colleagues to contribute to this Special Issue with original research articles or review articles. We believe that this collection will have a significant impact in the analytical research community.

This Special Issue was supported by the Sample Preparation Task Force and Network, supported by the Division of Analytical Chemistry of the European Chemical Society.

Verónica Pino
Idaira Pacheco-Fernández
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Green analytical methods
  • Miniaturization
  • Automation
  • Solvent-free methods
  • Green solvents
  • Ionic liquids
  • Deep eutectic solvents
  • Supramolecular solvents
  • Nanomaterials
  • Biomaterials

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
A New Method for Determination of Thymol and Carvacrol in Thymi herba by Ultraperformance Convergence Chromatography (UPC2)
Molecules 2020, 25(3), 502; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25030502 - 23 Jan 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Ultraperformance convergence chromatography is an environmentally friendly analytical technique for dramatically reducing the use of organic solvents compared to conventional chromatographic methods. In this study, a rapid and sensitive ultraperformance convergence chromatography method was firstly established for quantification of thymol and carvacrol, two [...] Read more.
Ultraperformance convergence chromatography is an environmentally friendly analytical technique for dramatically reducing the use of organic solvents compared to conventional chromatographic methods. In this study, a rapid and sensitive ultraperformance convergence chromatography method was firstly established for quantification of thymol and carvacrol, two positional isomers of a major bioactive in the volatile oil of Thymi herba, the dried leaves and flowers of Thymus mongolicus or Thymus przewalskii, known in China as “Dijiao.” Using a TrefoilTM CEL1 column, thymol and carvacrol were separated in less than 2.5 min and resolution was enhanced. The method was validated with respect to precision, accuracy, and linearity according to the National Medical Products Administration guidelines. The optimized method exhibited good linear correlation (r = 0.9998−0.9999), excellent precision (relative standard deviations (RSDs) < 1.50%), and acceptable recoveries (87.29–102.89%). The limits of detection for thymol and carvacrol were 1.31 and 1.57 ng/L, respectively, while their corresponding limits of quantification were 2.63 and 3.14 ng/L. Finally, the quantities of the two compounds present in 16 T. mongolicus and four T. przewalskii samples were successfully evaluated by employing the developed method. It is hoped that the results of this study will serve as a guideline for the quality control of Thymi herba. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances towards Green Analytical Chemistry)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Magnetic Solid-Phase Extraction of Organic Compounds Based on Graphene Oxide Nanocomposites
Molecules 2020, 25(5), 1148; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25051148 - 04 Mar 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Graphene oxide (GO) is a chemical compound with a form similar to graphene that consists of one-atom-thick two-dimensional layers of sp2-bonded carbon. Graphene oxide exhibits high hydrophilicity and dispersibility. Thus, it is difficult to be separated from aqueous solutions. Therefore, functionalization [...] Read more.
Graphene oxide (GO) is a chemical compound with a form similar to graphene that consists of one-atom-thick two-dimensional layers of sp2-bonded carbon. Graphene oxide exhibits high hydrophilicity and dispersibility. Thus, it is difficult to be separated from aqueous solutions. Therefore, functionalization with magnetic nanoparticles is performed in order to prepare a magnetic GO nanocomposite that combines the sufficient adsorption capacity of graphene oxide and the convenience of magnetic separation. Moreover, the magnetic material can be further functionalized with different groups to prevent aggregation and extends its potential application. Until today, a plethora of magnetic GO hybrid materials have been synthesized and successfully employed for the magnetic solid-phase extraction of organic compounds from environmental, agricultural, biological, and food samples. The developed GO nanocomposites exhibit satisfactory stability in aqueous solutions, as well as sufficient surface area. Thus, they are considered as an alternative to conventional sorbents by enriching the analytical toolbox for the analysis of trace organic compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances towards Green Analytical Chemistry)
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