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Special Issue "DNA Damage and Repair"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioorganic Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Daniel Roca-Sanjuán
Website
Guest Editor
Institut de Ciència Molecular, València, Spain
Interests: quantum chemistry of the excited electronic state; DNA photochemistry; DNA photorepair; chemiexcitation; chemi/bioluminescence
Dr. Virginie L. Lhiaubet-Vallet
Website
Guest Editor
Instituto de Tecnología Química (ITQ), Universitat Politècnica de València, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Valencia, Spain
Interests: DNA photochemistry; DNA photorepair; drug photosensitization, photoprotection; energy transfer processes
Prof. Dr. Iñaki Tuñón
Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Química Física, Universidad de Valencia, 46100 Burjassot, Spain
Interests: qm/mm simulations; reaction dynamics; enzymatic catalysis; computational biochemistry; free energy calculations

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

DNA is a molecule of paramount importance due to its fundamental biological role in carrying and storing genetic information. As such, its stability is key for safeguarding DNA integrity from external stress. This is achieved, inter alia, by means of specific repair mechanisms that ensure an efficient and prompt correction of the DNA defects. Nonetheless, some exogenous or endogenous chemical or physical agents may change this well-functioning scenario, provoking the formation of deleterious lesions that, if left unrepaired, threaten cell integrity.

This Special Issue represents an excellent opportunity for researchers of different areas to share their latest progresses and aims at developing a work in the “frontier of knowledge” with an interdisciplinary approach between chemistry (experimental and theoretical), biology, and medicine. The published original articles or reviews will open new paths toward the understanding of the generation and repair of DNA lesions, thus making it possible to advance knowledge of the processes that are at the origin of tumorigenesis.

Dr. Virginie L. Lhiaubet-Vallet
Dr. Daniel Roca-Sanjuán
Prof. Iñaki Tuñón
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • DNA damage
  • DNA repair
  • Photolyase
  • Oxidative damage
  • Electron transfer
  • Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers
  • (6-4) photoproducts
  • Chemiexcitation
  • Damaged oligonucleotides structure and dynamics
  • G-quadruplexes
  • Charge transfer states

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Guanine Radicals Generated in Telomeric G-Quadruplexes by Direct Absorption of Low-Energy UV Photons: Effect of Potassium Ions
Molecules 2020, 25(9), 2094; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25092094 - 30 Apr 2020
Abstract
The study deals with the primary species, ejected electrons, and guanine radicals, leading to oxidative damage, that is generated in four-stranded DNA structures (guanine quadruplexes) following photo-ionization by low-energy UV radiation. Performed by nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy with 266 nm excitation, it focusses [...] Read more.
The study deals with the primary species, ejected electrons, and guanine radicals, leading to oxidative damage, that is generated in four-stranded DNA structures (guanine quadruplexes) following photo-ionization by low-energy UV radiation. Performed by nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy with 266 nm excitation, it focusses on quadruplexes formed by folding of GGG(TTAGGG)3 single strands in the presence of K+ ions, TEL21/K+. The quantum yield for one-photon ionization (9.4 × 10−3) was found to be twice as high as that reported previously for TEL21/Na+. The overall population of guanine radicals decayed faster, their half times being, respectively, 1.4 and 6.7 ms. Deprotonation of radical cations extended over four orders of magnitude of time; the faster step, concerning 40% of their population, was completed within 500 ns. A reaction intermediate, issued from radicals, whose absorption spectrum peaked around 390 nm, was detected. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue DNA Damage and Repair)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Resolving DNA Damage: Epigenetic Regulation of DNA Repair
Molecules 2020, 25(11), 2496; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25112496 - 27 May 2020
Abstract
Epigenetic research has rapidly evolved into a dynamic field of genome biology. Chromatin regulation has been proved to be an essential aspect for all genomic processes, including DNA repair. Chromatin structure is modified by enzymes and factors that deposit, erase, and interact with [...] Read more.
Epigenetic research has rapidly evolved into a dynamic field of genome biology. Chromatin regulation has been proved to be an essential aspect for all genomic processes, including DNA repair. Chromatin structure is modified by enzymes and factors that deposit, erase, and interact with epigenetic marks such as DNA and histone modifications, as well as by complexes that remodel nucleosomes. In this review we discuss recent advances on how the chromatin state is modulated during this multi-step process of damage recognition, signaling, and repair. Moreover, we examine how chromatin is regulated when different pathways of DNA repair are utilized. Furthermore, we review additional modes of regulation of DNA repair, such as through the role of global and localized chromatin states in maintaining expression of DNA repair genes, as well as through the activity of epigenetic enzymes on non-nucleosome substrates. Finally, we discuss current and future applications of the mechanistic interplays between chromatin regulation and DNA repair in the context cancer treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue DNA Damage and Repair)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Planned paper 1:

Type of the paper: Review

Tentative title: Epigenetics and DNA damage repair

Authors: Theodoros Rampias

Affiliations: Biomedical Research Foundation of the Academy of Athens, 4 Soranou Efessiou St., Athens 11527, Greece

Planned paper 2:

Type of the paper: Article

Tentative title: Tracing the Photoaddition of Clinically Approved Psoralens to DNA

Authors: Janina Diekmann, Isabell Theves, Kristoffer Thom, and Peter Gilch

 

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