Special Issue "Advances in Rhenium Mineralogy, Geochemistry and Industrial Uses"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2015).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Panagiotis Voudouris
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geology and Geoenvironment, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 15784 Athens, Greece
Interests: ore minerals; critical metals; magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits; mineralogy of hydrothermal alteration in porphyry-epithermal systems; mineralogy and genesis of gemstones
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Vasilios Melfos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Faculty of Geology, Department of Mineralogy, Petrology and Economic Geology, 541 24 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: ore deposits; porphyry-epithermal mineralization; mineralogy; geochemistry; fluid inclusions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Rhenium with an average concentration of <1 part per billion is enriched in only few places at the Earth's crust. It is mainly obtained as a by-product of molybdenum and copper refinement from Cu-Mo porphyries and sediment-hosted deposits. Rhenium is among the most expensive metals, with principal application in high-temperature superalloys for use in jet engines. Molybdenite is the major repository of Re in the Earth’s crust. Re-bearing molybdenite with more than 1 wt. % Re, Re-Mo-Cu sulfides and the pure Re-bearing sulfide rheniite have been rarely found in porphyry-style Cu-Mo deposits, in magmatic Cu-Ni deposits and in sublimates of active volcanoes. The purpose of this Special Issue is to intergrate all new information about rhenium mineralogy and geochemistry in diverse types of ores deposits worldwide, highlight the causes of Re-enrichment in various styles of mineralization and present advances on industrial uses of rhenium. On deposit scale, associated ore mineralogy will be tested as a tool for rhenium enrichment and future exploration.

Dr. Panagiotis Voudouris
Dr. Vasilios Melfos
Guest Editors

Keywords

  • rhenium mineralogy
  • molybdenite geochemistry
  • ore deposits
  • rhenium applications

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
The Distribution, Character, and Rhenium Content of Molybdenite in the Aitik Cu-Au-Ag-(Mo) Deposit and Its Southern Extension in the Northern Norrbotten Ore District, Northern Sweden
Minerals 2014, 4(4), 788-814; https://doi.org/10.3390/min4040788 - 01 Dec 2014
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4598
Abstract
Molybdenite in the Aitik deposit and its southern extension was studied through mineralogical/chemical analysis and laboratory flotation tests. It is demonstrated that molybdenite varies considerably in grain size, ranging from coarse (>20 μm) to very fine (<2 μm) and occurs predominantly as single [...] Read more.
Molybdenite in the Aitik deposit and its southern extension was studied through mineralogical/chemical analysis and laboratory flotation tests. It is demonstrated that molybdenite varies considerably in grain size, ranging from coarse (>20 μm) to very fine (<2 μm) and occurs predominantly as single grains in the groundmass of the rocks, as grain aggregates, and intergrown with chalcopyrite and pyrite. The dominating molybdenite-bearing rocks are the mica schists, the quartz-monzodiorite, and the Salmijärvi biotite-amphibole gneiss, the latter containing mostly medium-coarsegrained molybdenite. Later geological features, such as garnet-magnetite-anhydrite-K feldspar alteration and pegmatite dikes appear to be responsible for a significant part of the distribution pattern of molybdenite. Molybdenite grains contain up to 1587 ppm Re, with an average of 211 ± 10 ppm in Aitik molybdenite and 452 ± 33 ppm in Salmijärvi molybdenite. The higher Re concentrations are found in molybdenite associated with sericite- and quartz-amphibole-magnetite altered rocks, whereas low Re values occur in rocks in which potassic alteration is prominent. Molybdenite recovery is influenced by the mineralogy of the host rock and the alteration grade; hence both of these factors will have an impact on potential recoveries. The recovery of molybdenite was lower from flotation feeds with significant amounts of Mg-bearing clay-micas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Rhenium Mineralogy, Geochemistry and Industrial Uses)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Extremely Re-Rich Molybdenite from Porphyry Cu-Mo-Au Prospects in Northeastern Greece: Mode of Occurrence, Causes of Enrichment, and Implications for Gold Exploration
Minerals 2013, 3(2), 165-191; https://doi.org/10.3390/min3020165 - 02 May 2013
Cited by 43 | Viewed by 6692
Abstract
Extremely Re-rich molybdenite occurs with pyrite in sodic–calcic, sodic–sericitic and sericitic-altered porphyritic stocks of granodioritic–tonalitic and granitic composition in the Sapes–Kirki–Esymi, Melitena and Maronia areas, northeastern Greece. Molybdenite in the Pagoni Rachi and Sapes deposits is spatially associated with rheniite, as well as [...] Read more.
Extremely Re-rich molybdenite occurs with pyrite in sodic–calcic, sodic–sericitic and sericitic-altered porphyritic stocks of granodioritic–tonalitic and granitic composition in the Sapes–Kirki–Esymi, Melitena and Maronia areas, northeastern Greece. Molybdenite in the Pagoni Rachi and Sapes deposits is spatially associated with rheniite, as well as with intermediate (Mo,Re)S2 and (Re,Mo)S2 phases, with up to 46 wt % Re. Nanodomains and/or microinclusions of rheniite may produce the observed Re enrichment in the intermediate molybdenite–rheniite phases. The extreme Re content in molybdenite and the unique presence of rheniite in porphyry-type mineralization, combined with preliminary geochemical data (Cu/Mo ratio, Au grades) may indicate that these deposits have affinities with Cu–Au deposits, and should be considered potential targets for gold mineralization in the porphyry environment. In the post-subduction tectonic regime of northern Greece, the extreme Re and Te enrichments in the magmatic-hydrothermal systems over a large areal extent are attributed to an anomalous source (e.g., chemical inhomogenities in the mantle-wedge triggered magmatism), although local scale processes cannot be underestimated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Rhenium Mineralogy, Geochemistry and Industrial Uses)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Rhenium Nanochemistry for Catalyst Preparation
Minerals 2012, 2(3), 244-257; https://doi.org/10.3390/min2030244 - 14 Aug 2012
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 3998
Abstract
The review presents synthetic approaches to modern rhenium-based catalysts. Creation of an active center is considered as a process of obtaining a nanoparticle or a molecule, immobilized within a matrix of the substrate. Selective chemical routes to preparation of particles of rhenium alloys, [...] Read more.
The review presents synthetic approaches to modern rhenium-based catalysts. Creation of an active center is considered as a process of obtaining a nanoparticle or a molecule, immobilized within a matrix of the substrate. Selective chemical routes to preparation of particles of rhenium alloys, rhenium oxides and the molecules of alkyltrioxorhenium, and their insertion into porous structure of zeolites, ordered mesoporous MCM matrices, anodic mesoporous alumina, and porous transition metal oxides are considered. Structure-property relationships are traced for these catalysts in relation to such processes as alkylation and isomerization, olefin metathesis, selective oxidation of olefins, methanol to formaldehyde conversion, etc. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Rhenium Mineralogy, Geochemistry and Industrial Uses)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop