Special Issue "Chemical, Mineralogical and Isotopic Studies of Diagenesis of Carbonate and Clastic Sediments"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Mineral Deposits".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 November 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Ihsan Al-Aasm
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON N9B 3P4, Canada
Interests: chemical, mineralogical and isotopic studies of diagenesis of carbonate and clastic sediments; rersevoir characterization and porosity evolution; environmental isotopic chemistry of lake sediments, water and biota
Prof. Dr. Howri Mansurbeg
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Petroleum Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Soran University, The Kurdistan Region, Iraq
Interests: reservoir quality evaluation and prediction, linking diagenesis to sequence stratigraphy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleague,

Diagenesis of carbonates and clastic sediments encompasses the biochemical, mechanical, and chemical changes that occur in sediments subsequent to deposition and prior to low-grade metamorphism.  These parameters which, to a large extent, control diagenesis in carbonates and clastic sediments include the primary composition of the sediments, depositional facies, pore water chemistry, burial-thermal and tectonic evolution of the basin, and paleo-climatic conditions.

Diagenetic processes involve widespread chemical, mineralogical, and isotopic modifications affected by the original mineralogy of carbonate and clastic sediments. These diagenetic alterations will impose a major control on porosity and permeability and, hence, on hydrocarbon reservoirs and water aquifers, as well as the presence of other important economic minerals.

In this Special Issue, we encourage submissions focusing on understanding the interplay between mineralogical and chemical changes in carbonates and clastic sediments and diagenetic processes, fluid flow, tectonics, mineral reactions at variable scales, and environments from a variety of sedimentary basins. Quantitative analyses of diagenetic reactions in these sediments using a variety of techniques are essential to understand the pathways of these reactions in different diagenetic environments.

Prof. Dr. Ihsan Al-Aasm
Prof. Dr. Howri Mansurbeg
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • mineralogy
  • isotope
  • chemical
  • diagenesis
  • carbonates
  • clastics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Clay Minerals and Element Geochemistry of Clastic Reservoirs in the Xiaganchaigou Formation of the Lenghuqi Area, Northern Qaidam Basin, China
Minerals 2019, 9(11), 678; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9110678 - 03 Nov 2019
Abstract
We performed mineralogical and geochemical analyses of core samples from the Lenghuqi area in the northern marginal tectonic belt of the Qaidam Basin. The clay mineralogy of the Xiaganchaigou Formation sandstone is dominated by I + I/S + C types and characterized by [...] Read more.
We performed mineralogical and geochemical analyses of core samples from the Lenghuqi area in the northern marginal tectonic belt of the Qaidam Basin. The clay mineralogy of the Xiaganchaigou Formation sandstone is dominated by I + I/S + C types and characterized by high illite, a higher mixed-layer illite/smectite and chlorite, lesser smectite, and an absence of kaolinite. The clay minerals reflect that the Oligocene sedimentary basin formed in an arid-semi-arid climate with weak leaching and chemical weathering, and that diagenesis occurred in a K+- and Mg2+-rich alkaline environment. Measured major oxide concentrations show clear correlations. The lower Xiaganchaigou Formation is representative of a dry and cold freshwater sedimentary environment, whereas the upper Xiaganchaigou Formation is warmer and more humid. Trace element and rare earth element variations indicate that the paleoclimate conditions of the lower Xiaganchaigou Formation sedimentary period were relatively cold and dry, while the upper Xiaganchaigou Formation formed under warmer and more humid climate conditions. These findings reflect a global climate of a cold and dry period from the late Eocene to early Oligocene, and a short warming period in the late Oligocene. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Origin and Sources of Minerals and Their Impact on the Hydrocarbon Reservoir Quality of the PaleogeneLulehe Formation in the Eboliang Area, Northern Qaidam Basin, China
Minerals 2019, 9(7), 436; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9070436 - 15 Jul 2019
Abstract
The Lulehe sandstone in the Eboliang area is a major target for hydrocarbon exploration in the northern Qaidam Basin. Based on an integrated analysis including thin section analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, cathodoluminescence investigation, backscattered electron images, carbon and oxygen stable isotope [...] Read more.
The Lulehe sandstone in the Eboliang area is a major target for hydrocarbon exploration in the northern Qaidam Basin. Based on an integrated analysis including thin section analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, cathodoluminescence investigation, backscattered electron images, carbon and oxygen stable isotope analysis and fluid inclusion analysis, the diagenetic processes mainly include compaction, cementation by carbonate and quartz, formation of authigenic clay minerals (i.e., chlorite, kaolinite, illite-smectite and illite) and dissolution of unstable materials. Compaction is the main factor for the deterioration of reservoir quality; in addition, calcite cement and clay minerals are present, including kaolinite, pore-filling chlorite, illite-smectite and illite, which also account for reservoir quality reduction. Integration of petrographic studies and isotope geochemistry reveals the carbonate cements might have originated from mixed sources of bioclast- and organic-derived CO2 during burial. The quartz cement probably formed by feldspar dissolution, illitization of smectite and kaolinite, as well as pressure solution of quartz grains. Smectite, commonly derived from alteration of volcanic rock fragments, may have been the primary clay mineral precursor of chlorite. In addition, authigenic kaolinite is closely associated with feldspar dissolution, suggesting that alteration of detrital feldspar grains was the most probable source for authigenic kaolinite. With the increase in temperature and consumption of organic acids, the ratio of K+/H+ increases and the stability field of kaolinite is greatly reduced, thereby transforming kaolinite into mixed layer illite/smectite and illite. Within the study area, porosity increases with chlorite content up to approximately 3% volume and then decreases slightly, indicating that chlorite coatings are beneficial at an optimum volume of 3%. A benefit of the dissolution of unstable minerals and feldspar grains is the occurrence of secondary porosity, which may enhance porosity to some extent. However, the solutes cannot be transported over a large scale in the deep burial environment, and simultaneous precipitation of byproducts of feldspar dissolution such as authigenic kaolinite and quartz cement will occur in situ or in adjacent pores, resulting in heterogeneity of the reservoirs. Full article
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