Special Issue "Hydrometallurgical Processing of Base Metal Sulphides"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Mineral Processing and Metallurgy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Robbie McDonald

CSIRO Mineral Resources, PO Box 7229, Karawara, WA 6152, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nickel laterite processing; sulphides pressure oxidation; QXRD analysis; aluminosilicate processing; battery grade products

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Base metals (and any associated PGMs and/or PMs) are generally recovered from sulphide concentrates in the initial stage using pyrometallurgical processing. However, as the grade and quality of sulphide resources continue to decline, it is becoming harder to generate feed materials that are suitable for smelting without incurring penalties. Apart from being employed for sulphide mattes, hydrometallurgical processes provide options for materials that are not amenable to smelting due to their low grade and/or impurity levels. Over the years, a vast range of these process technologies has been studied and, the technology has been commercially applied in a number of instances. The metal extraction step is typically characterized by approaches that range from pressure to atmospheric leaching in reactors, to leaching in vats or heaps (both chemical and biological) to in situ recovery.

This Special Issue invites contributions that examine hydrometallurgical processing technologies suitable for base metal sulphides and the various conventional steps from extraction to solution purification, metal concentration, and the recovery of the metal values. However, for some technologies, the focus instead is upon the removal of impurities and/or the enhancement of concentrate grade. Submissions on these subjects will enhance the expected diversity of this Special Issue. For the same reason, given that the processing of base metal sulphides may be required to enable the recovery of precious metals and/or platinum-group metals, relevant papers on these topics are also welcome.

Dr. Robbie McDonald
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • copper
  • nickel
  • lead
  • zinc
  • sulphide
  • heap
  • matte
  • concentrate
  • mineral characterization
  • mineral replacement
  • atmospheric oxidation
  • pressure oxidation
  • leaching
  • extraction
  • kinetics
  • impurities removal
  • solution purification
  • solvent extraction
  • ion exchange
  • electrowinning

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Sodium Alginate on Chlorite and Serpentine in Chalcopyrite Flotation
Minerals 2019, 9(3), 196; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9030196
Received: 23 February 2019 / Revised: 21 March 2019 / Accepted: 22 March 2019 / Published: 26 March 2019
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Abstract
Chlorite and serpentine are common magnesium-containing gangue minerals in copper sulfide flotation. In this study, sodium alginate, a natural hydrophilic polysaccharide, was introduced as a selective depressant for these gangue minerals. Micro-flotation tests were conducted on both single minerals and synthetic mixtures. The [...] Read more.
Chlorite and serpentine are common magnesium-containing gangue minerals in copper sulfide flotation. In this study, sodium alginate, a natural hydrophilic polysaccharide, was introduced as a selective depressant for these gangue minerals. Micro-flotation tests were conducted on both single minerals and synthetic mixtures. The flotation results showed that sodium alginate could simultaneously depress the flotation of chlorite and serpentine effectively, but seldom influenced the floatability of chalcopyrite at pH 9. In the ternary mixture flotation, a concentrate with a Cu grade of 31% could be achieved at Cu recovery of 90%. The selective depression of chlorite and serpentine was also validated by the real ore flotation experiments. The selective depression mechanism was investigated through adsorption tests, zeta potential measurements, and FTIR analyses. The adsorption density results implied that sodium alginate selectively adsorbed on the surface of phyllosilicates, but no adsorption on the chalcopyrite surface was observed. The zeta potential results showed that the sodium alginate could selectively decrease the surface charge of chlorite and serpentine. The FTIR results revealed the chemical adsorption of sodium alginate on the chlorite and serpentine surface and no form of adsorption on chalcopyrite, agreeing well with the adsorption density results. On the basis of these results, a selective adsorption model of sodium alginate on the mineral surface was proposed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrometallurgical Processing of Base Metal Sulphides)
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