Redox Reactivity of Iron Minerals in the Geosphere, 2nd Edition

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Mineralogy and Biogeochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 December 2024 | Viewed by 1075

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Biogeochemical Processes Group, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203, Room E-137, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439, USA
Interests: biogeochemistry; geomicrobiology; geochemistry; biomineralization; microbial transformations of minerals
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Guest Editor
Biogeochemical Processes Group, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203, Room E-113, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439, USA
Interests: biogeochemistry; mineralogy; nutrients and contaminants fate; chemical speciation; X-ray spectroscopy

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Guest Editor
Institute of Chemical Engineering, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia 1103, Bulgaria
Interests: synchrotron X-ray methods; redox transformations; contaminant transport; complexation mechanisms; surface processes; nanoprecipitation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Iron is a highly abundant element in the lithosphere, and Fe oxides, Fe-bearing phyllosilicate minerals, Fe sulfides, and other Fe-bearing minerals are common constituents of soils and sediments. As such, redox-active Fe-bearing minerals are key players in electron transfer reactions involved in the biogeochemical cycling of elements and the transformation of organic and inorganic contaminants in both natural and engineered redox dynamic environments.

We invite contributions relatking to, but not limited to, laboratory and field studies of the transformations of Fe-bearing minerals via abiotic and microbially-driven redox reactions; the coupling of redox reactions of Fe-bearing minerals with the biogeochemical cycling of critical elements (e.g., N, P, and S); and the impacts of Fe redox reactions on contaminant transformation, fate, and transport in aquatic and terrestrial environments. We especially encourage multidisciplinary studies that use cutting-edge approaches such as advanced imaging and spectroscopic techniques, isotopic analysis, and omics-based molecular microbiology.

Dr. Edward J. O'Loughlin
Dr. Lucie Stetten
Dr. Maxim I. Boyanov
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • biomineralization
  • iron oxides
  • iron sulfides
  • transformation
  • contaminants
  • mineralization

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

15 pages, 2827 KiB  
Article
Interactions of Perrhenate (Re(VII)O4) with Fe(II)-Bearing Minerals
by Anthony W. N. Kilber, Maxim I. Boyanov, Kenneth M. Kemner and Edward J. O’Loughlin
Minerals 2024, 14(2), 181; https://doi.org/10.3390/min14020181 - 07 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Rhenium (Re) is an extremely rare element, with a crustal abundance of approximately 0.4 parts per billion (ppb) and a sea water concentration of 8.3 parts per trillion (ppt). However, Re concentrations in anoxic marine sediments range from 2 to 184 ppb, which [...] Read more.
Rhenium (Re) is an extremely rare element, with a crustal abundance of approximately 0.4 parts per billion (ppb) and a sea water concentration of 8.3 parts per trillion (ppt). However, Re concentrations in anoxic marine sediments range from 2 to 184 ppb, which is attributed to reduction of the highly soluble perrhenate ion (Re(VII)O4) to insoluble Re(IV) species. Anoxic sediments typically contain Fe(II) and sulfide species, which could potentially reduce Re(VII) to Re(IV). In this study, we examined the interactions of KReO4 with magnetite (Fe3O4), siderite (FeCO3), vivianite (Fe3(PO4)2•8H2O), green rust (mixed Fe(II)/Fe(III) layered double hydroxide), mackinawite (FeS), and chemically reduced nontronite (NAu-1) using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to determine the valence state and speciation of Re. Uptake of Re by green rust was rapid, with ~50% associated with the solids within 2 days. In contrast, there was <10% uptake by the other Fe(II) phases over 48 days. Reduction of Re(VII) to Re(IV) was only observed in the presence of green rust, producing clusters of bidentate-coordinated Re(IV)O6 octahedra.. These results suggest that except for green rust, the potential for other Fe(II)-bearing minerals to act as reductants for ReO4 in sedimentary environments requires further investigation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Redox Reactivity of Iron Minerals in the Geosphere, 2nd Edition)
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