Special Issue "Macro and Microorganism Interactions"

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Luciana Giovannetti

University of Florence, Florence, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: molecular microbiology; soil microbial ecology; metagenomics
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Carlo Viti

University of Florence, Florence, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: microbial ecology; metagenomics; phenomics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The knowledge of symbiotic, parasitic, and commensal interactions between macro and microorganisms is fundamental to explain their coexistence, ecology, and productivity. These interactions constitute an extraordinarily complex web that includes trophic structures and molecular communications. The net of interactions between macro and microorganisms is very tight and shows its own metabolic and regulatory processes. Therefore, some authors have introduced the terms “holobiont” and “superorganism”. Nowadays, the use of traditional approaches and omics technologies allows the improvement of our knowledge about many aspects of this emerging and exciting field of research. Therefore, we decided to launch a Special Issue on macro and microorganism interactions, to which you are kindly invited to contribute with either an original paper or a review article. These are the topics that will be considered for the Special Issue:

a) Plant–microorganism interactions;

b) Algae–microorganism interactions;

c) Animal–microorganism interactions.

Prof. Luciana Giovannetti
Prof. Carlo Viti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Microorganisms is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • plant–microorganism interactions
  • algae–microorganism interactions
  • animal–microorganism interactions
  • symbiotic
  • parasitic
  • commensal

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Metabolic Modeling of Pectobacterium parmentieri SCC3193 Provides Insights into Metabolic Pathways of Plant Pathogenic Bacteria
Microorganisms 2019, 7(4), 101; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7040101
Received: 17 February 2019 / Revised: 26 March 2019 / Accepted: 2 April 2019 / Published: 5 April 2019
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Abstract
Understanding plant–microbe interactions is crucial for improving plants’ productivity and protection. Constraint-based metabolic modeling is one of the possible ways to investigate the bacterial adaptation to different ecological niches and may give insights into the metabolic versatility of plant pathogenic bacteria. We reconstructed [...] Read more.
Understanding plant–microbe interactions is crucial for improving plants’ productivity and protection. Constraint-based metabolic modeling is one of the possible ways to investigate the bacterial adaptation to different ecological niches and may give insights into the metabolic versatility of plant pathogenic bacteria. We reconstructed a raw metabolic model of the emerging plant pathogenic bacterium Pectobacterium parmentieri SCC3193 with the use of KBase. The model was curated by using inParanoind and phenotypic data generated with the use of the OmniLog system. Metabolic modeling was performed through COBRApy Toolbox v. 0.10.1. The curated metabolic model of P. parmentieri SCC3193 is highly reliable, as in silico obtained results overlapped up to 91% with experimental data on carbon utilization phenotypes. By mean of flux balance analysis (FBA), we predicted the metabolic adaptation of P. parmentieri SCC3193 to two different ecological niches, relevant for the persistence and plant colonization by this bacterium: soil and the rhizosphere. We performed in silico gene deletions to predict the set of essential core genes for this bacterium to grow in such environments. We anticipate that our metabolic model will be a valuable element for defining a set of metabolic targets to control infection and spreading of this plant pathogen. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Macro and Microorganism Interactions)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Green Technology: Bacteria-Based Approach Could Lead to Unsuspected Microbe–Plant–Animal Interactions
Microorganisms 2019, 7(2), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7020044
Received: 14 December 2018 / Revised: 23 January 2019 / Accepted: 2 February 2019 / Published: 6 February 2019
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Abstract
The recent and massive revival of green strategies to control plant diseases, mainly as a consequence of the Integrated Pest Management (IPM) rules issued in 2009 by the European Community and the increased consumer awareness of organic products, poses new challenges for human [...] Read more.
The recent and massive revival of green strategies to control plant diseases, mainly as a consequence of the Integrated Pest Management (IPM) rules issued in 2009 by the European Community and the increased consumer awareness of organic products, poses new challenges for human health and food security that need to be addressed in the near future. One of the most important green technologies is biocontrol. This approach is based on living organisms and how these biocontrol agents (BCAs) directly or indirectly interact as a community to control plant pathogens and pest. Although most BCAs have been isolated from plant microbiomes, they share some genomic features, virulence factors, and trans-kingdom infection abilities with human pathogenic microorganisms, thus, their potential impact on human health should be addressed. This evidence, in combination with the outbreaks of human infections associated with consumption of raw fruits and vegetables, opens new questions regarding the role of plants in the human pathogen infection cycle. Moreover, whether BCAs could alter the endophytic bacterial community, thereby leading to the development of new potential human pathogens, is still unclear. In this review, all these issues are debated, highlighting that the research on BCAs and their formulation should include these possible long-lasting consequences of their massive spread in the environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Macro and Microorganism Interactions)
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