Special Issue "Optical Trapping and Manipulation: From Fundamentals to Applications, Volume II"

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "A:Physics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2021) | Viewed by 4291

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Philip Jones
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
Interests: optical tweezers; optical binding; singular optics; biophysics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Daniel R. Burnham
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Francis Crick Institute, 1 Midland Road, London NW1 1AT, UK
Interests: optical tweezers; DNA replication; biophysics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Following the success of our previous Special Issue in 2019, we are pleased to announce a further Special Issue of Micromachines dedicated to the latest research in optical trapping, to be titled “Optical Trapping and Manipulation: From Fundamentals to Applications, Volume II” and scheduled for publication in 2020 and 2021.

In recognition of the broad impact of optical manipulation techniques across disciplines, the Special Issue welcomes contributions on all aspects of optical trapping and manipulation. These may comprise both theoretical and experimental studies, and applications of optical manipulation methods in fields including (but not limited to) single-molecule biophysics, cell biology, nanotechnology, atmospheric chemistry, and fundamental optics are particularly welcome to showcase the breadth of the current research.

The Special Issue will accept diverse forms of contributions, including research papers, short communications, methods, and review articles that represent the state-of-the-art in optical trapping.

Prof. Philip Jones
Dr. Daniel R. Burnham
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Optical tweezers
  • Optical trapping
  • Optical manipulation

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Simultaneous Trapping of Two Types of Particles with Focused Elegant Third-Order Hermite–Gaussian Beams
Micromachines 2021, 12(7), 769; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12070769 - 29 Jun 2021
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Abstract
The focusing properties of elegant third-order Hermite–Gaussian beams (TH3GBs) and the radiation forces exerted on dielectric spherical particles produced by such beams in the Rayleigh scattering regime have been theoretically studied. Numerical results indicate that the elegant TH3GBs can [...] Read more.
The focusing properties of elegant third-order Hermite–Gaussian beams (TH3GBs) and the radiation forces exerted on dielectric spherical particles produced by such beams in the Rayleigh scattering regime have been theoretically studied. Numerical results indicate that the elegant TH3GBs can be used to simultaneously trap and manipulate nanosized dielectric spheres with refractive indexes lower than the surrounding medium at the focus and those with refractive indexes larger than the surrounding medium in the focal vicinity. Furthermore, by changing the radius of the beam waist, the transverse trapping range and stiffness at the focal plane can be changed. Full article
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Article
Enhanced Signal-to-Noise and Fast Calibration of Optical Tweezers Using Single Trapping Events
Micromachines 2021, 12(5), 570; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12050570 - 17 May 2021
Viewed by 777
Abstract
The trap stiffness us the key property in using optical tweezers as a force transducer. Force reconstruction via maximum-likelihood-estimator analysis (FORMA) determines the optical trap stiffness based on estimation of the particle velocity from statistical trajectories. Using a modification of this technique, we [...] Read more.
The trap stiffness us the key property in using optical tweezers as a force transducer. Force reconstruction via maximum-likelihood-estimator analysis (FORMA) determines the optical trap stiffness based on estimation of the particle velocity from statistical trajectories. Using a modification of this technique, we determine the trap stiffness for a two micron particle within 2 ms to a precision of ∼10% using camera measurements at 10 kfps with the contribution of pixel noise to the signal being larger the level Brownian motion. This is done by observing a particle fall into an optical trap once at a high stiffness. This type of calibration is attractive, as it avoids the use of a nanopositioning stage, which makes it ideal for systems of large numbers of particles, e.g., micro-fluidics or active matter systems. Full article
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Article
High-Order Fiber Mode Beam Parameter Optimization for Transport and Rotation of Single Cells
Micromachines 2021, 12(2), 226; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12020226 - 23 Feb 2021
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Abstract
Optical tweezers are becoming increasingly important in biomedical applications for the trapping, propelling, binding, and controlled rotation of biological particles. These capabilities enable applications such as cell surgery, microinjections, organelle extraction and modification, and preimplantation genetic diagnosis. In particular, optical fiber-based tweezers are [...] Read more.
Optical tweezers are becoming increasingly important in biomedical applications for the trapping, propelling, binding, and controlled rotation of biological particles. These capabilities enable applications such as cell surgery, microinjections, organelle extraction and modification, and preimplantation genetic diagnosis. In particular, optical fiber-based tweezers are compact, highly flexible, and can be readily integrated into lab-on-a-chip devices. Taking advantage of the beam structure inherent in high-order modes of propagation in optical fiber, LP11, LP21, and LP31 fiber modes can generate structured radial light fields with two or more concentrations in the cross-section of a beam, forming multiple traps for bioparticles with a single optical fiber. In this paper, we report the dynamic modeling and optimization of single cell manipulation with two to six optical traps formed by a single fiber, generated by either spatial light modulation (SLM) or slanted incidence in laser-fiber coupling. In particular, we focus on beam size optimization for arbitrary target cell sizes to enable trapped transport and controlled rotation of a single cell, using a point matching method (PMM) of the T-matrix to compute trapping forces and rotation torque. Finally, we validated these optimized beam sizes experimentally for the LP21 mode. This work provides a new understanding of optimal optical manipulation using high-order fiber modes at the single-cell level. Full article
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Review

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Review
Optical-Trapping Laser Techniques for Characterizing Airborne Aerosol Particles and Its Application in Chemical Aerosol Study
Micromachines 2021, 12(4), 466; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12040466 - 20 Apr 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1262
Abstract
We present a broad assessment on the studies of optically-trapped single airborne aerosol particles, particularly chemical aerosol particles, using laser technologies. To date, extensive works have been conducted on ensembles of aerosols as well as on their analogous bulk samples, and a decent [...] Read more.
We present a broad assessment on the studies of optically-trapped single airborne aerosol particles, particularly chemical aerosol particles, using laser technologies. To date, extensive works have been conducted on ensembles of aerosols as well as on their analogous bulk samples, and a decent general description of airborne particles has been drawn and accepted. However, substantial discrepancies between observed and expected aerosols behavior have been reported. To fill this gap, single-particle investigation has proved to be a unique intersection leading to a clear representation of microproperties and size-dependent comportment affecting the overall aerosol behavior, under various environmental conditions. In order to achieve this objective, optical-trapping technologies allow holding and manipulating a single aerosol particle, while offering significant advantages such as contactless handling, free from sample collection and preparation, prevention of contamination, versatility to any type of aerosol, and flexibility to accommodation of various analytical systems. We review spectroscopic methods that are based on the light-particle interaction, including elastic light scattering, light absorption (cavity ring-down and photoacoustic spectroscopies), inelastic light scattering and emission (Raman, laser-induced breakdown, and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopies), and digital holography. Laser technologies offer several benefits such as high speed, high selectivity, high accuracy, and the ability to perform in real-time, in situ. This review, in particular, discusses each method, highlights the advantages and limitations, early breakthroughs, and recent progresses that have contributed to a better understanding of single particles and particle ensembles in general. Full article
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