Special Issue "Optical Trapping in Biology and Nanotechnology"

A special issue of Photonics (ISSN 2304-6732).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2015).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Philip Jones
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
Interests: optical tweezers, optical binding, singular optics, biophysics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the first demonstration of optical tweezers more than 30 years ago, the use of optical forces has become widespread, both as a research topic of fundamental interest, and as an enabling tool in diverse fields, including molecular biology, statistical physics, and colloid science.

In recognition of this, we are pleased to announce this Special Issue of the journal, Photonics on the theme of Optical Trapping in Biology and Nanotechnology. For this Special Issue, we welcome submissions reporting the most recent advances concerning the application of optical forces to biological and nano-scale systems including, but not limited to, subjects such as cell and single molecule biophysics, the trapping and manipulation of nanostructures and plasmonic materials, and the combination of optical trapping with spectroscopic techniques (including Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy).

Dr. Philip Jones
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Photonics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cell biophysics
  • single molecule biophysics
  • nanostructures
  • plasmonics
  • spectroscopy

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Optical Nanofiber Integrated into Optical Tweezers for In Situ Fiber Probing and Optical Binding Studies
Photonics 2015, 2(3), 795-807; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics2030795 - 02 Jul 2015
Cited by 8
Abstract
Precise control of particle positioning is desirable in many optical propulsion and sorting applications. Here, we develop an integrated platform for particle manipulation consisting of a combined optical nanofiber and optical tweezers system. We show that consistent and reversible transmission modulations arise when [...] Read more.
Precise control of particle positioning is desirable in many optical propulsion and sorting applications. Here, we develop an integrated platform for particle manipulation consisting of a combined optical nanofiber and optical tweezers system. We show that consistent and reversible transmission modulations arise when individual silica microspheres are introduced to the nanofiber surface using the optical tweezers. The observed transmission changes depend on both particle and fiber diameter and can be used as a reference point for in situ nanofiber or particle size measurement. Thence, we combine scanning electron microscope (SEM) size measurements with nanofiber transmission data to provide calibration for particle-based fiber assessment. This integrated optical platform provides a method for selective evanescent field manipulation of micron-sized particles and facilitates studies of optical binding and light-particle interaction dynamics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Trapping in Biology and Nanotechnology)
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Open AccessArticle
Developing a New Biophysical Tool to Combine Magneto-Optical Tweezers with Super-Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy
Photonics 2015, 2(3), 758-772; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics2030758 - 26 Jun 2015
Cited by 8
Abstract
We present a novel experimental setup in which magnetic and optical tweezers are combined for torque and force transduction onto single filamentous molecules in a transverse configuration to allow simultaneous mechanical measurement and manipulation. Previously we have developed a super-resolution imaging module which, [...] Read more.
We present a novel experimental setup in which magnetic and optical tweezers are combined for torque and force transduction onto single filamentous molecules in a transverse configuration to allow simultaneous mechanical measurement and manipulation. Previously we have developed a super-resolution imaging module which, in conjunction with advanced imaging techniques such as Blinking assisted Localisation Microscopy (BaLM), achieves localisation precision of single fluorescent dye molecules bound to DNA of ~30 nm along the contour of the molecule; our work here describes developments in producing a system which combines tweezing and super-resolution fluorescence imaging. The instrument also features an acousto-optic deflector that temporally divides the laser beam to form multiple traps for high throughput statistics collection. Our motivation for developing the new tool is to enable direct observation of detailed molecular topological transformation and protein binding event localisation in a stretching/twisting mechanical assay that previously could hitherto only be deduced indirectly from the end-to-end length variation of DNA. Our approach is simple and robust enough for reproduction in the lab without the requirement of precise hardware engineering, yet is capable of unveiling the elastic and dynamic properties of filamentous molecules that have been hidden using traditional tools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Trapping in Biology and Nanotechnology)
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Open AccessArticle
Optical Fiber Tweezers Fabricated by Guided Wave Photo-Polymerization
Photonics 2015, 2(2), 634-645; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics2020634 - 12 Jun 2015
Cited by 15
Abstract
In this work the use of guided wave photo-polymerization for the fabrication of novel polymeric micro tips for optical trapping is demonstrated. It is shown that the selective excitation of linear polarized modes, during the fabrication process, has a direct impact on the [...] Read more.
In this work the use of guided wave photo-polymerization for the fabrication of novel polymeric micro tips for optical trapping is demonstrated. It is shown that the selective excitation of linear polarized modes, during the fabrication process, has a direct impact on the shape of the resulting micro structures. Tips are fabricated with modes LP02 and LP21 and their shapes and output intensity distribution are compared. The application of the micro structures as optical tweezers is demonstrated with the manipulation of yeast cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Trapping in Biology and Nanotechnology)
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Open AccessArticle
A Model for the Force Exerted on a Primary Cilium by an Optical Trap and the Resulting Deformation
Photonics 2015, 2(2), 604-618; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics2020604 - 29 May 2015
Abstract
Cilia are slender flexible structures extending from the cell body; genetically similar to flagella. Although their existence has been long known, the mechanical and functional properties of non-motile (“primary”) cilia are largely unknown. Optical traps are a non-contact method of applying a localized [...] Read more.
Cilia are slender flexible structures extending from the cell body; genetically similar to flagella. Although their existence has been long known, the mechanical and functional properties of non-motile (“primary”) cilia are largely unknown. Optical traps are a non-contact method of applying a localized force to microscopic objects and an ideal tool for the study of ciliary mechanics. We present a method to measure the mechanical properties of a cilium using an analytic model of a flexible, anchored cylinder held within an optical trap. The force density is found using the discrete-dipole approximation. Utilizing Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, we then integrate this force density and numerically obtain the equilibrium deformation of the cilium in response to an optical trap. The presented results demonstrate that optical trapping can provide a great deal of information and insight about the properties and functions of the primary cilium. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Trapping in Biology and Nanotechnology)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Chirality in Optical Trapping and Optical Binding
Photonics 2015, 2(2), 483-497; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics2020483 - 11 May 2015
Cited by 18
Abstract
Optical trapping is a well-established technique that is increasingly used on biological substances and nanostructures. Chirality, the property of objects that differ from their mirror image, is also of significance in such fields, and a subject of much current interest. This review offers [...] Read more.
Optical trapping is a well-established technique that is increasingly used on biological substances and nanostructures. Chirality, the property of objects that differ from their mirror image, is also of significance in such fields, and a subject of much current interest. This review offers insight into the intertwining of these topics with a focus on the latest theory. Optical trapping of nanoscale objects involves forward Rayleigh scattering of light involving transition dipole moments; usually these dipoles are assumed to be electric although, in chiral studies, magnetic dipoles must also be considered. It is shown that a system combining optical trapping and chirality could be used to separate enantiomers. Attention is also given to optical binding, which involves light induced interactions between trapped particles. Interesting effects also arise when binding is combined with chirality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Trapping in Biology and Nanotechnology)
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