Special Issue "Nanomaterials Based Sensors"

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 September 2017).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Aaron H.P. Ho
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electronic Engineering, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong
Tel. +852-3943-8279
Interests: nano-materials for photonic and sensor applications; surface plasmon resonance biosensors; nanophotonics; optical instrumentation; lab-on-a-disc
Dr. Guanghui Wang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Modern Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China
Tel. +86-25-8359-4648
Interests: microfluidics and micro-nano-sensing technology; centrifugal microfluidics; pptical fiber microfluidics for sensing applications; silicon-based nano-flow devices and systems
Dr. Ken-Tye Yong
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Director, Centre for Bio Devices and Signal Analysis (VALENS), School of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, College of Engineering, Nanyang, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 Singapore
Tel. +65-6790-5444
Interests: nanotechnology for cancer detection and therapy; multifunctional nanoparticles or quantum dots; biocompatible MEMS; pharmacokinetics and toxicity from nanoparticles; novel biomaterials; nanomaterials for solar and optoelectronic applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanomaterials have made significant impacts in all aspects of human life. Their unique attributes, including large surface-area-to-volume ratios, quantum confinement, near-field coupling and meta-material effects, have led to application opportunities in biological and physical sciences as well as engineering. With the emergence of the Internet of Things (IoT), which requires a continuous supply of feedback data on a massive scale, high-performance sensors for collecting all kinds of parameters are needed. Sensors for temperature, photons, pollutants and different kinds of objects, with operation parameters specially optimized for their respective applications are always in great demand. This Special Issue on “Nanomaterials Based Sensors” aims to provide a venue for reporting the latest advancements in the field. The theme covers new nanomaterials, novel devices/systems, signal transduction, and new concepts that have implication on sensing performance. Submission may take the form of reviews, regular research papers, short communications or application notes. We hope that this Special Issue will ultimately become a preferred source of information for researchers or application specialists working on high-performance sensing technology.

Prof. Dr. Aaron H.P. Ho
Dr. Ken-Tye Yong
Dr. Guanghui Wang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biological, Chemical & Physical Sensors
  • Protein and DNA Sensing
  • Nanoparticles
  • Quantum Dots
  • Plamonics
  • Meta-materials
  • Nanotechnology
  • Nanofabrication
  • Nano-catalysis
  • Quantum Confinement
  • Signal Transduction

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
An Assay Using Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance and Gold Nanorods Functionalized with Aptamers to Sense the Cytochrome-c Released from Apoptotic Cancer Cells for Anti-Cancer Drug Effect Determination
Micromachines 2017, 8(11), 338; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi8110338 - 22 Nov 2017
Cited by 8
Abstract
To determine the degree of cancer cell killing after treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs, we have developed a sensitive platform using localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and aptamers to detect the extracellular cytochrome-c (cyto-c), a mitochondrial protein released from cancer cells [...] Read more.
To determine the degree of cancer cell killing after treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs, we have developed a sensitive platform using localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and aptamers to detect the extracellular cytochrome-c (cyto-c), a mitochondrial protein released from cancer cells for the induction of apoptosis after treatment, to evaluate the effectiveness of cancer therapy. In this assay, a short single-stranded 76-mer DNA aptamer with a unique DNA sequence, which binds towards the cyto-c like an antibody with a high binding affinity and specificity, was conjugated to gold nanorods (AuNR) for LSPR sensing. Practically, cyto-c was first grabbed by a capturing antibody functionalized on the surface of micro-magnetic particles (MMPs). Subsequently, the AuNR-conjugated aptamer was added to form a complex sandwich structure with cyto-c (i.e., (MMP-Ab)-(cyto-c)-(AuNR-aptamer)) after washing away the non-target impurities, such as serum residues and intracellular contents, in a microfluidic chip. The sandwich complex led to formation of AuNR aggregates, which changed the LSPR signals in relation to the amount of cyto-c. With the LSPR signal enhancement effects from the AuNRs, the detection limit of cyto-c, sparked in human serum or culture medium, was found to be 0.1 ng/mL in our platform and the whole sensing process could be completed within two hours. Moreover, we have applied this assay to monitor the apoptosis in leukemia cancer cells induced by a potential anti-cancer agent phenylarsine oxide. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials Based Sensors)
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Open AccessArticle
Enhanced Sensitivity of MoTe2 Chemical Sensor through Light Illumination
Micromachines 2017, 8(5), 155; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi8050155 - 12 May 2017
Cited by 7
Abstract
Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) semiconducting materials have recently attracted wide attention and been regarded as promising building blocks for chemical sensors due to their high surface-to-volume ratio. However, their low response hinders the realization of high-performance 2D TMDCs chemical sensors. Here, [...] Read more.
Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) semiconducting materials have recently attracted wide attention and been regarded as promising building blocks for chemical sensors due to their high surface-to-volume ratio. However, their low response hinders the realization of high-performance 2D TMDCs chemical sensors. Here, we demonstrate the improvement of sensing performance of molybdenum ditelluride (MoTe2) gas sensor through continuous light illumination. The dependence of sensing performance on the energy of photons and light intensity is systematically studied. The response to NH3 is dramatically enhanced by more than 25 times under 254 nm ultraviolet (UV) light illumination with intensity of 2.5 mW/cm2. Moreover, a remarkable low detection limit of 3 ppb is achieved, which is improved by 80 times compared with that in dark condition. The results demonstrate that light illumination is a promising method to improve the sensitivity of 2D TMDCs chemical sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials Based Sensors)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Light-Activated Metal Oxide Gas Sensors: A Review
Micromachines 2017, 8(11), 333; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi8110333 - 18 Nov 2017
Cited by 11
Abstract
Conductometric gas sensors facilitated by photons have been investigated for decades. Light illumination may enhance device attributes including operational temperature, sensing sensitivity and selectivity. This paper aims to provide an overview on the progress of light-activated gas sensors, with a specific focus on [...] Read more.
Conductometric gas sensors facilitated by photons have been investigated for decades. Light illumination may enhance device attributes including operational temperature, sensing sensitivity and selectivity. This paper aims to provide an overview on the progress of light-activated gas sensors, with a specific focus on sensors based on metal oxides. The material systems that have been studied include pure metal oxides, heterostructures of semiconductor-metal oxides and metal-metal oxides, and metal oxides with dopant. Other reported works on the use of different nanostructures such as one-dimensional and porous nanostructures, study of sensing mechanisms and the interplay between various factors are also summarized. Possible directions for further improvement of sensing properties, through optimizing the size of nanomaterials, film thickness, light intensity and wavelength are discussed. Finally, we point out that the main challenge faced by light-activated gas sensors is their low optical response, and we have analyzed the feasibility of using localized surface plasmon resonance to solve this drawback. This article should offer readers some key and instructive insights into the current and future development of light-activated gas sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials Based Sensors)
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